The World Economic Forum Tells Us Why it is Evil to Its Core.

The stated mission of the WEF sounds harmless enough, but the long endgame is horrifying if we take them at their word.  

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation”


In my last article I explored some of the connections between the tech industry, government, big investment and central banking that make up what Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum calls “public-private cooperation” and showed it to be nothing more than systemic corruption, graft, and corporate welfare.

This scenario may often be the case but there have been times in the past when public private partnerships have been a great deal more than simple corruption and inefficiency. With the dawn of COVID-19 and the World Economic Forum’s announcement of the Great Reset, it is vital to examine the other, much darker side of public-private partnerships. As we’ll unfortunately see, there are many reasons to be concerned (alongside those who many will call alarmists) about continued progress toward authoritarian dystopia.

The dark history of public-private cooperation

At the beginning of the 1930’s pre-war rearmament period in Nazi Germany, Hugo Junkers was the owner of one of the most respected, and innovative aircraft manufacturers in Germany. When the Nazis seized power in 1933, Reichskommissar of Aviation, Hermann Göring:

…requested Junkers and his businesses aid in the German re-armament. Junkers declined, to which the Nazi’s responded to by demanding ownership of all patents and market shares from his remaining companies under threat of imprisonment on the grounds of High Treason.

Junkers was confined to house arrest and died mysteriously the same day Nazi officials visited his home for a round of “negotiations” to persuade him to give up his company. “Very shortly after, his wife Therese ceded all control of the Junkers companies and patents to the Nazis for a tiny fraction of their worth.”

In public-private cooperation with the Nazis but without Hugo, the Junkers company went on to design and manufacture the notorious Stuka dive-bomber which wrought havoc over Europe all during World War II.

Unlike Junkers, the executives and stockholders of quite a number of companies with still familiar names like Krupp, Bayer, BMW, Daimler, and IG Farben profitably cooperated with the Nazis during the same period. One such company was the Ravensburg Germany branch of a lesser-known Swiss company, Escher-Wyss AG, whose managing director was one Eugen Schwab, father of Klaus Schwab.

As Johnny Vedmore reports for Unlimited Hangout, during this time, Escher-Wyss, was the largest employer in Ravensburg. In addition, during the same period and while Eugen Schwab was chief executive, the Ravensburg factory was awarded the title, “National Socialist Model Company”. This award was not for nothing as the Ravensburg factory employed forced laborers and even maintained a small special camp for these “workers” on the factory premises. Specifically for the war effort, Escher-Wyss aided the Nazi Wehrmacht in producing:

…significant weapons of war as well as more basic armaments. The Escher-Wyss company was a leader in large turbine technology for hydroelectric dams and power plants, but they also manufactured parts for German fighter planes.

In addition:

The company had engineered a 14,500 HP turbine for the Norsk Hydro industrial facility’s strategically important hydroelectric plant at Vemork, near Rjukan in Norway. The Norsk Hydro plant, part powered by Escher Wyss, was the only industrial plant under Nazi control capable of producing heavy water, an ingredient essential for making plutonium for the Nazi atomic bomb program.

Allied forces were aware of the potentially game-changing developments as revealed by Record Group 226 compiled by the US Army Office of Strategic Services (OSS). In 1944, aided by the intelligence, Norwegian resistance forces were able to sink the ship transporting the heavy water to Germany. As Vedmore puts it, “With help from Escher-Wyss, the Nazis were almost able to change the tides of war and bring about an Axis victory.”

By 1945, with the defeat of Hitler, there was no more Nazi master to serve, but no matter. The remaining power vacuum was filled not just by the US and allies but by the Cold War itself. For Eugen, and later for Klaus, this meant the rise of the Military Industrial Complex (MIC). Cloaked in an appealing veneer of democracy, the MIC was a bigger, new-and-improved gravy train, and far more lucrative than Nazi Germany ever even had the potential of becoming. It exported its violence far from Europe to places like Vietnam, and it was growing.  

Eugen’s career continued to advance. By 1966 (after Klaus had come of age), Eugen was President of the Ravensburg Chamber of Commerce and involved in the founding of a committee for the construction of a railway tunnel connecting Switzerland with Italy. This particular tunnel was never constructed, but his comments regarding the committee show that he was likely a strong influence on Klaus in terms of world philosophy. He defined this committee as a project “that creates a better and faster connection for large circles in our increasingly converging Europe and thus offers new opportunities for cultural, economic and social development”. Like Klaus and his concept of “Stakeholder Capitalism”, Eugen sought to shape the nature of cultural and social interaction and use the state to merge them with for-profit business. Now, recall the kinds of cultural and social “development” with which Eugen had been willing to collaborate during the Nazi era just a short time before. Eugen Schwab inserted himself as a beneficiary of the Nazi war machine, not because he was a Nazi or that he loved war but because the Nazi war machine was the biggest, most powerful machine available in which to insert himself.

By 1967, Klaus Schwab had earned multiple degrees including a Master of Public Administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard. While at Harvard, Schwab was taught by Henry Kissinger. Kissinger would of course soon go on to become President Nixon’s National Security Advisor as well as a notorious war criminal. Klaus, however later names Kissinger as one of the top three to four figures who had most influenced his thinking throughout his life.  

Two years later, it was Klaus’s turn as a director of the newly merged Sulzer Escher-Wyss AG. With his arrival, the company began none other than the illegal proliferation of nuclear weapons technology. Again, according to Vedmore, “…while Schwab was on the board, [the company] also began playing a critical key role in the development of South Africa’s illegal nuclear weapons programme during the darkest years of the apartheid regime. Klaus Schwab was a leading figure in the founding of a company culture which helped Pretoria build six nuclear weapons and partially assemble a seventh.” In addition:

… South Africa had constructed a reactor as part of a plan to produce plutonium, the SAFARI-2 located at Pelindaba. SAFARI-2 was part of a project to develop a reactor moderated by heavy water… This link to developing heavy water for the creation of uranium [sic, likely plutonium], the same technology which had been utilised by the Nazis also with the help of Escher-Wyss, may explain why South Africans initially got Escher-Wyss involved.

Clearly Klaus saw what his father had done and early on and sought to emulate it. Apparently unsatisfied, however, he sought out and made acquaintance with bigger fish than his father, who had once played nice with the Nazis and gotten away with it.

In 1946, Hermann J. Abs became a member of the European League for Economic Co-operation. The ELEC’s mission was to develop policies on monetary integration, common transport, energy, and welfare systems. Moreover, the ELAC was generally dedicated to the establishment of the European common market, which was the precursor of the European Union. In 1948, Abs was put in charge of allocating the funds of the Marshall Plan to fitting recipients in German industry, and in 1949 he became a top financial advisor to Konrad Adenauer, West Germany’s first post-war Chancellor. By all appearances, at this point, Abs was a man of the new, progressive, uniting Europe and just the kind of high-level business leader an up-and-comer like Klaus would want to rub elbows with. Now let’s look deeper at Hermann’s history.

In 1937, as the Nazis were expanding their reign of terror into neighboring countries, Abs joined the board of directors at Deutsche Bank, Germany’s largest bank. It was during this period that Deutsche Bank was tasked with ‘Aryanization’ of banks in Austria and Czechoslovakia that were owned by Jews.

By 1942, as a representative of lender Deutsche Bank, Abs sat on the boards of 40 companies. A quarter of these were in Nazi occupied countries and like Escher-Wyss used slave labor. By 1943, Deutsche Bank’s wealth had quadrupled. One of the boards on which Hermann Abs served was none other than I.G. Farben, whose subsidiary Degesch was the supplier of the cyanide gas Zyklon B. used in the gas chambers at Auschwitz and other death camps. Unlike many of his I.G. Farben colleagues (who claimed ignorance, received acquittals or light sentences, and went on to “respectable” post war industrial careers), Abs, despite being arrested by the British in 1945 was never prosecuted for war crimes. He later returned to Deutsche Bank as chairman of the board and as we’ve seen, became one of the most important figures in Germany’s post-war reconstruction.

Finally, in 1971, after witnessing a winning formula of public-private partnership carried out by his father, Klaus Schwab created a global outfit whose sole purpose was to promote the same formula over and over again between governments and politically connected corporate movers and shakers. The inaugural European Management Symposium, later to be known as the World Economic Forum, was held in Davos, Switzerland in January of that year. After a successful first gathering, the following year’s symposium promised to be even better, but unfortunately for Klaus:

The Meeting Chairman, Hermann J. Abs, Chairman of Deutsche Bank and the most prominent European business leader at that time, had to cancel his participation at short notice. (Emphasis added.)

So what?

Plenty of so-called public-private partnerships have existed in the US before and since WWII. In fact, they’ve been on all corners of the globe ever since there have been governments. Many consider them wasteful and unproductive, but we don’t usually think of them as horrifying as in the above. History shows they can certainly be lived with. Besides, progressives believe in all kinds of reasons why they’re beneficial. So why be so concerned about Klaus Schwab’s father and his peripheral role in a long-defeated regime and whether Klaus may have learned a thing or two from him? We don’t live in that world anymore. We’ve moved on.  

We have moved on indeed…

In Klaus Schwab’s own words:

We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before.

He is describing what he and the crowd that jets into Davos call the “Fourth Industrial Revolution”. He continues:

The First Industrial Revolution used water and steam power to mechanize production. The Second used electric power to create mass production. The Third used electronics and information technology to automate production. Now a Fourth Industrial Revolution is building on the Third, the digital revolution that has been occurring since the middle of the last century. It is characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.

He lists off a number of emerging technologies:

… such as artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, materials science, energy storage, and quantum computing.

And:

The speed of current breakthroughs has no historical precedent. When compared with previous industrial revolutions, the Fourth is evolving at an exponential rather than a linear pace. Moreover, it is disrupting almost every industry in every country. And the breadth and depth of these changes herald the transformation of entire systems of production, management, and governance.

He tells us that the kind of impact current technological changes will have on our lives and the economy is like nothing we’ve ever seen and implies that, as individuals, we are ill equipped to face its challenges. In his 2017 book, The Fourth Industrial Revolution, he writes:

About 47% of total employment in the US is at risk, perhaps over the next decade or two, characterized by a much broader scope of job destruction at a much faster pace than labor market shifts experienced in previous industrial revolutions.

In his 2018 book, Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Schwab writes:

We will become better able to manipulate our own genes, and those of our children. These developments raise profound questions: where do we draw the line between human and machine? What does it mean to be human?  

Who is “we”? Somebody might become better at manipulating my genes and those of my children, but it doesn’t really seem to include me. Do you plan to become better at manipulating your own genes? Takes a lot of know-how. Good luck. Collectivists like Schwabs’ use of the word “we” can be both hypnotic and absurd.

And:

Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies therefore appear to be undermining humans’ choice and ability to apply their skills and interests to meaningful work, and may lead to generations of workers living precarious and fragmented lives. Navigating these shifts will require new regulations for non-standard work, investments in adult learning and proactive employment services.

He certainly sounds like he knows what he is talking about. Is he right? Is this the future? Maybe. But, in light of all we know about Klaus Schwab, assuming all of these changes come to pass, isn’t it equally important to ask, “Who benefits?”Klaus tells us who should benefit. Why, everyone, of course! All the “stakeholders” need to be brought together in new forms of 21st century global “governance”, imbued with “a new leadership mindset” to ensure all the new technologies are designed with “our collective values” built-in from the very start. That way, the “externalities” of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4thIR) can be adequately managed, and the promise of the new technological era can be incorporated into “smart cities” and “bridge the digital divide” to the remotest parts of the planet for the benefit of the most isolated of people. So, by everybody, he literally means everybody.

Okay, but besides everybody who benefits? Among the listed founding partners of the WEF’s Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution are: Salesforce, Accenture, Deloitte, Facebook, Hitachi, Huawei, McKinsey, Microsoft, Mitsubishi, Palantir, Visa, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and Netflix. The major stockholders and executives of these companies are just a few of the “stakeholders” in the 4thIR. Stakeholders like these are the important ones because they are the ones who pay Klaus Schwab handsomely to do what he does. And that’s just the private side of “public private cooperation”. When writing about the 4thIR, the WEF devotes an enormous amount of print and online real estate to not just issues of “privacy” but also to “our collective values”. These are areas for the public side of the partnership. Schwab would tell us that the role of the public side is to see that the needs and concerns of all “stakeholders” are heard. He also envisions a regulatory environment that is accommodating to “changing and unforeseen needs”.

There is, however, one characteristic of the “public” side of the public private partnership without which it would be useless to Schwab and all the entities above: the government monopoly on the use of force and the threat thereof.  

More specifically, then, my question is, “Who benefits from the use of government force in the name of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?”

In a World Economic Forum white paper entitled Reimagining Regulation for the Age of AI: New Zealand Pilot Project, the authors state:

Modern regulatory domains are so complex that they can no longer be handled by the state alone. A modern regulatory body is not authoritarian, but one part of a broader system that influences and steers through a full spectrum of approaches. Harder regulatory powers may be useful in certain situations, while
soft approaches will work better in others.  

…a lack of experience can be solved through giving the group the ability to call on expert advice when it is needed. Other challenges are more complex.… too narrow or specific a scope may work against regulators in areas of fast-moving technology. Some regulators (such as the US Food and Drug Administration…) have deliberately broad remits that are intended to future-proof it if the field moves in unforeseen directions. (Emphasis added.)

The companies mentioned above and countless like them don’t only devote significant time and financial resources to the World Economic Forum but also millions of dollars to the campaigns of politicians and their parties as well as to lobbyists who write the legislation that regulates them.  

We are taught to believe that the purpose of government regulation is to protect consumers and the public from nefarious or dangerous business activity; and in some cases, perhaps, it actually does. But when it is most effective, it provides a government enforced monopoly to a small cartel. This is an old game. In the US, it goes back at least to the first transcontinental railroads. This is accomplished with regulations, written by industry lobbyists themselves, so expensive to implement that only the biggest and most politically established corporations can afford to implement them. All other competition is driven out.  

And what about situations where “soft approaches will work better”? One timely public private partnership to highlight these days is the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccines, particularly when it comes to vaccine mandates. There were no widespread government enforced mandates until the Comirnaty vaccine by WEF partner Pfizer was approved for use by the FDA. Who benefits from this rapid approval? For Pfizer’s sake, it was a good thing the “soft approach” option was available, as well as a “broad remit”. Otherwise, more scrutiny of its safety and effectiveness would have been required.

It is important to note that a current Pfizer board, and WEF member Scott Gottlieb, M.D., served as FDA Commissioner from 2017 to 2019. These kinds of connections are frequently referred to as “the revolving door”. When the WEF talks about “soft approaches” and says, “A modern regulatory body is not authoritarian”, it seems to mean not authoritarian toward the interests of the companies with the most legislative and regulatory clout, whereas it may be quite authoritarian to countless others, like those who are vaccinated against their will to the benefit of Pfizer.

Decoding the WEF

Again, in Klaus Schwab’s 2018 book, Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution, he provides his wish list for a world dominated by such things as AI, quantum computing, and biotech. Several quotes are demonstrative of a graft agenda in the guise of concern for the well-being of humanity. A lot can be learned if one cares to read between the lines using history and WEF actions as a guide:

“All technologies are political.” …technologies are solutions, products and implementations that are developed through social processes, stand in for people and institutions, and contain within them a whole set of assumptions, values and principles that intern can (and do) affect power, structure and status in society. (p.32)

The fact that different cultures and types of values highlight differences in priorities shouldn’t be a roadblock to thinking through a values-based approach to technologies. On the contrary, the more we think it through, the better we will become at understanding which priorities are critical for societies and how technology affects and mediates these values.… (Emphasis added.) (p. 35)

Current disruptions are forcing political leaders to rethink the paradigm that shapes the relations among individual, society and economic activity. This includes considering reforms for reshaping the social contract between individual and society.… (p.61)

…We must seek to share the benefits of this technological age among all citizens regardless of age, income, race or beliefs.(p. 64)

He references a WEF white paper:

In a White Paper entitled, “A New Social Covenant,” The World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Values (2012 to 2014) identified “a broad consensus across cultures religions and philosophies on some shared, human aspirations” which together represent “a powerful, unifying ideal” of “valued individuals, committed to one another, and respectful of future generations.” (P.35)

He quotes from A New Social Covenant:

Many previous efforts have focused on individual rights— which are essential.But our focus is on what we owe to one another — both within nations and among nations.… There is great cultural diversity when it comes to values but there is also broad consensus — across cultures, religions and philosophy — on some shared, human aspirations. [Such as] The importance of a common good that transcends individual interests. (Emphasis added.)(pp. 35-36)

Here is how I interpret what I read above:

Not just anyone possessing the know-how should be allowed to develop new technologies. New technology needs to be controlled and kept within the right hands, preferably members of the WEF who are qualified to ascertain the correct “assumptions, values and principles” that preserve the correct centers of “power, structure and status”, and “which priorities are critical for societies”.

The rights of individuals are an impediment to bottom lines of WEF members. Everybody needs what we’re selling, and we’ll use the taxes and newly printed money from your governments to make sure you get it.

The clearest, most sinister, and disingenuous tell that “Stakeholder Capitalism” is a scam, is Klaus Schwab’s advocacy of a universal basic income (UBI). We can leave aside all economic arguments for or against the UBI. In his advocacy, Schwab is showing himself and the activities of the WEF to be that of a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Again, in Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution,he writes: (p.61)

Current disruptions are forcing political leaders to rethink the paradigm that shapes the relations among individual, society and economic activity. This includes considering reforms for reshaping the social contract between individual and society.

The discussion of a universal basic income (UBI) is one example of this conversation.… the primary justification for UBI is social justice: as income increasingly goes toward land, natural resources, and intellectual property – all parts of society is collective wealth – everybody should have a modest share of this collective wealth in the form of an unconditional basic income. (Emphasis added.)

The process of, as he says, income increasingly going toward “land, natural resources, and intellectual property” is demonstrably the result of central bank policies. Here it is worth mentioning that central banks are government enforced cartels of private banks with monopoly authority to issue “legal tender” currency.

In my June 5, 2021, article Can the Great Reset Succeed, and Does It Matter?, I pointed out that:

Out of 31 members of the WEF board of trustees, 13 represent high level banking interests from the US, UK, EU, Canada, Japan, Russia and China. Ten of the 13 hold or have held high level government and central banking positions in and out of their respective countries. In addition, eight WEF board members are high level investment firm executives.

In an inflationary environment of artificially low interest rates and inflated money supply, those who receive the new money first will quickly use it to artificially bid up the prices of assets, concentrating that wealth into fewer and fewer hands, and make it nearly impossible for ordinary people to save for the future. The membership and highest governance of the WEF is made up of the central and commercial bankers, who create the new money out of nothing, and those with the greatest capacity to borrow it and turn it into assets like land, natural resources, and intellectual property”. In addition, asset bubbles are created by the policies of these actors, allowing them to snatch assets for pennies on the dollar, including homes from the individuals who are bankrupted when these bubbles finally burst. We saw this in 1999, 2008, and most recently with the COVID lockdowns.

Under Schwab’s vision, the central banking scam is to go to such extreme that it eliminates peoples’ ability to make a living, and a UBI is required to keep the population pacified, and compliant with the program.

One can connect the events of 2008 with the incestuous relationship between Congress, the Treasury, the Fed, the world’s largest investment banks, and the World Economic Forum by looking at the crisis caused by the government lockdowns of 2020 and the government response.

Again from Can the Great Reset Succeed, and Does It Matter?:

Out of the $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Congress allocated $454 billion to be used for Federal Reserve emergency lending programs.

Investment giant BlackRock … was appointed the sole manager for two of the lending programs: the Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility (PMCCF) and Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facility (SMCCF). These two were intended to provide access to credit so that companies could maintain business operations during the economic shock of the COVID lockdowns.

BlackRock made its fortune after the 2008 financial crisis in “exchange traded funds” (ETFs). By 2020, it owned over 800 funds with $1.9 trillion in assets under management and was number one of a “big-three” that by 2017 had become the largest shareholder “in almost 90% of S&P 500 firms, including Apple, Microsoft, ExxonMobil, General Electric and Coca-Cola.” In addition “BlackRock owns major interests in nearly every mega-bank and in major media.”

The SMCCF began operating on May 12, 2020. As of May 30, the only purchases made under the BlackRock administered facility “were ETFs, mainly owned by BlackRock itself. Between May 14 and May 20, about $1.58 billion in ETFs were bought through the…SMCCF, of which $746 million or about 47% came from BlackRock ETFs.” BlackRock was using its position as sole manager of the SMCCF to buy ETFs in the name of the Fed owned by BlackRock itself. This gave BlackRock a golden opportunity to self-deal.

The story finishes itself when we realize that BlackRock Chairman and CEO Larry Fink also sits on the board of trustees at the World Economic Forum.

When Klaus Schwab advocates for a UBI, it is not out of a concern for social justice. It is because apparently central banking is a scam that extends so far and it’s impoverishment of individuals is so complete, that it impairs the perpetrators’ ability to carry the scam out any further! If the banksters don’t hand back a few crumbs from what they’ve stolen, the resulting social unrest could mean the end of the party.

At this point, is it such a stretch to infer that with his creation, the World Economic Forum, Klaus Schwab is following in the footsteps of such men as Eugen Schwab, Henry Kissinger, and Hermann Abs? Is it even a stretch to guess he is aiming to outdo them? If you are still not convinced, consider the following:

“I own nothing, have no privacy, and life has never been better.”

The potential need for a UBI is a symptom of a financial system designed for the stealth extraction of wealth and resources from the population as a whole and consequently fosters dependence upon it. Such a level of dependence for life itself necessarily results in greater and greater control over the behavior and movements of individuals.  

Nowhere is this more succinctly illustrated than in the 2016 World Economic Forum article entitled, Welcome to 2030. I own nothing, have no privacy, and life has never been better, written by Danish MP Ida Auken. In it, she presents an urban future where all goods are provided as services, chosen for you by AI algorithms based on your prior choices, choices which are not your private business but data that belongs to the AI cloud. (And who owns the AI cloud? We don’t know.)

In it, she laments that her “…biggest concern is all the people who do not live in our city…Those who got upset with the political system and turned against it. They live different kind of lives…in the empty and abandoned houses in small 19th century villages.”  

She seems to be saying that political dissenters will be confined to ghettos but then goes on to say, “…I have no real privacy. No where I can go and not be registered. I know that, somewhere, everything I do, think and dream of is recorded. I just hope that nobody will use it against me.”  

“I just hope that nobody will use it against me?” She doesn’t even hint at what she might be able to do (if anything), if somebody does use it against her, or who that somebody might be. We do know that somebody will possess a highly advanced version of Total Information Awareness and be part of a class of people who own everything to her nothing. She has no agency, no power, and it’s either this utopian fishbowl existence or the ghetto. Yet she goes on to say, “All in all, it is a good life.”  A good life for whom? Keep in mind, she’s a parliamentarian of a Western European country, and thus, certainly a “stakeholder” or possibly a literal stockholder in the “own everything” pie. So sure, for Auken and a fortunate few, “Life has never been better”. 

Incidentally, Internet Archive shows increased interest in the 2016 article during the month of November 2020, and on November 20th the provocative title was changed to, Here’s how life could change in my city by the year 2030. You may notice the preceding link with the new title is broken. Searching for it on the WEF website also won’t give it to you either. Except for Internet Archive and a few other sites, the article has been effectively “memory holed”.

How “Useless” are you?

At the January 2020 annual WEF meeting in Davos, futurist-historian Yuval Noah Harari gave a speech:

Yuval Noah Harari

In Davos we hear so much about the enormous promises of technology …But technology might also disrupt human society and the very meaning of human life in numerous ways, ranging from the creation of a global useless class to the rise of data colonialism and of digital dictatorships.…

If you know enough biology and have enough computing power and data, you can hack my body and my brain and my life, and you can understand me better than I understand myself. You can know my personality type, my political views, my sexual preferences, my mental weaknesses, my deepest fears and hopes. You know more about me than I know about myself. And you can do that not just to me, but to everyone.

A system that understands us better than we understand ourselves can predict our feelings and decisions, can manipulate our feelings and decisions, and can ultimately make decisions for us.

Now in the past, many governments and tyrants wanted to do it, but nobody understood biology well enough and nobody had enough computing power and data to hack millions of people. Neither the Gestapo nor the KGB could do it. But soon at least some corporations and governments will be able to systematically hack all the people. We humans should get used to the idea that we are no longer mysterious souls – we are now hackable animals.…

Gestapo, KGB, “hackable animals”, “get used to the idea”! After all the above, does that kind of talk send a chill? And from the WEF itself!

He goes on to echo much of what Klaus has already said:

Automation will soon eliminate millions upon millions of jobs, and while new jobs will certainly be created, it is unclear whether people will be able to learn the necessary new skills fast enough.… the automation revolution will not be a single watershed event following which the job market will settle down into a new equilibrium. Rather, it will be a cascade of ever bigger disruptions…

Then he adds:

Whereas in the past humans had to struggle against exploitation, in the twenty-first century the really big struggle will be against irrelevance. And it is much worse to be irrelevant than exploited. (Emphasis added.)

It looks as though these are our new choices, and we are being told to choose “exploited”. Exploited seems to be the proper choice according to Ida Auken. So, what will happen to those who are simply unexploitable? Harari continues:

Those who fail in the struggle against irrelevance would constitute a new “useless class” …useless from the viewpoint of the economic and political system. And this useless class will be separated by an ever-growing gap from the ever more powerful elite. …

These “useless” people are the ones Ida is so concerned about, who don’t live in “our city”, who live in the “empty and abandoned houses in small 19th century villages.” So, the question has to arise: Useless to whom? For what? These are people useless to those who own and control the new technology that supposedly put the “useless people” out of work and dependent on UBI. And useless to those who control the parasitic financial system that is probably much more responsible for doing the same. But what about to each other? Will they all see themselves as useless? Will they not begin to do what people have always done, i.e., use the abilities they do have to their advantage and trade the results of that with others doing the same? In other words, if left alone, the useless class would build communities, build an economy, and to some degree or another begin to create wealth.

Will this be acceptable to the “ever more powerful elite”? Is it realistic to expect the “useless” people to be left alone? Were Native Americans left alone? Have African Americans shunted into the Prison Industrial Complex through the war on drugs been left alone? If history is any indicator and Harari’s future comes to pass, the “useless class” will be seen as a threat. The threat will likely be in the form of their massive drain on the “mainstream” economy in the form of UBI. If Klaus is right and “about 47% of total employment in the US is at risk”, how big is that drain? Too big by anybody’s count, but certainly too big for those who own the “everything” from which it would have to be drained.

One thing Harari doesn’t address is scapegoating.This is a tactic used throughout history, including the Nazi era to divide and control populations. Such a tactic would be very useful to the ‘own everything’ class needing to control the ‘own nothing’ class. Speaking in January of 2020, the “pandemic of the unvaccinated” wasn’t a thing yet. Scapegoating the unvaccinated is something we are already seeing. A basic requirement for education and employment among the “ever more powerful elite” will be COVID vaccination. The useless class on the other hand will be made up of both vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. An effective means of controlling the useless class would be pitting them against each other along those lines.

Klaus Schwab has devoted his entire career not to doing what Eugen did but to being the broker and PR man for countless Eugen Schwabs in public private partnerships all over the globe. Clearly Eugen Schwab was a major influence on Klaus. Given the kind of rhetoric we hear from The WEF and Klaus himself, it is disturbing to remember that the political establishment Eugen served had a solution for an “other” or a “them” class—a “final” one.

Is that what we are really looking at, another Holocaust? I suppose anything is possible, but even after all the above, that possibility is difficult to contemplate as a realistic outcome. I hope that sentiment is not a reflection of my own naivete! But, given the seeming fragility of the financial system upon which all things WEF are built, a complete implosion of the almighty dollar (digital or otherwise) seems more likely. It would simply come about as a result of a socialistic attempt to support the 47% dead weight of the ‘useless’ class. If fact, under current conditions it could well occur before formation of such a class is even attempted in earnest.

More and more from fewer and fewer

Graft is an industry. It’s an old one, but with one important distinction from all the others. In an economy, new industries have many players and competitors. As industries mature, they tend to consolidate as weaker competitors are driven out or merged. Then, as technology and consumer needs change, whole new industries evolve and whole other industries wane or die.  

Not so with graft. The industry remains as long as there is a single politician engaged in the simplest corruption like bribery. Today we are seeing the continued global consolidation of the “graft industry”. This consolidation and continued high-level organization is the very purpose of the World Economic Forum. It is very much like an organized crime syndicate. Except the crimes of this outfit are committed by or with the blessings of the most powerful governments in the world along-side the biggest bankers in the world, who appear to have those governments right where they want them.  

This stage of the consolidation involves controlling and herding people into consuming more and more from fewer and fewer approved suppliers of goods and services. And people have less and less choice about not just what to consume but whether to consume. The COVID vaccine is the perfect example of mandatory consumption from what are effectively state-sponsored, for-profit political patrons. Klaus Schwab is fond of the word governance when presumably referring legislative and democratic processes working correctly. The process he demonstrably advocates however, is not governance but conquest. It’s not a of conquest of Czechoslovakia or Poland, but of our very bodies, the spoils of which go to the biggest best-connected banks, corporations, and ultimately to billionaires.  

Can the Great Reset Succeed—and Does It Matter?

The super-rich will reap the benefits of the Great Reset even if it’s a massive failure.

By Al Kircher

Over the past year much has been made of the so-called Great Reset agenda put forth by Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum (WEF) as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Many worry the GR is a push to implement a dystopian technocratic global state. Simply reading from the WEF website, there are those among its ranks who seem to wish for that.

However, the members of the WEF are likely as pragmatic as they are greedy. Such an ambitious vision is long-term, costly, and complex. It leaves out the prospect for the kind of short-term gains the members are accustomed to when corporate greed is married to state power, or what the World Economic Forum refers to as, “public private partnership”.

Until the events of 2020, the WEF has probably been best known for its annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, an event that is thoroughly covered each year in the mainstream press. In June of 2020 however, remarkably soon after the public became aware that that the COVID lockdowns would be a catastrophic global phenomenon, Klaus and a co-author published a book entitled COVID-19 THE GREAT RESET expounding on all the reasons why the economic devastation brought by the lockdowns necessitated a complete re-invention of capitalism from the bottom up.

Since that time alternative media has been in panic mode about the dystopian implications of a Great Reset, while mainstream media on the other hand has not done the same, even going as far as to report that it doesn’t exist and somehow is entirely the product of conspiracy theorists. This article will explain the Great Reset agenda according to its originators, as well as show that it is not anything very new at all.

The economic fallout of lockdowns and the ‘New Normal’

The lockdowns of 2020, imposed by governments all over the world, were in most cases a temporary phenomenon, but the economic effects brought on by them has been anything but. The lifting of lockdowns has brought recovery to some affected by them but by no means all.

Since its peak in March of 2020, the U.S. unemployment rate has dropped substantially and creates a rosy picture at first glance, but this is due to the way the Bureau of Labor and Statistics measures unemployment. At any point in time, a person is only considered “unemployed” if they have actively looked for employment within the past six weeks. The number of individuals reporting that they are not employed and furthermore not seeking employment has not recovered to pre-lockdown levels and has in some cases trended upward as official unemployment has gone down.

The effects of this reduced labor force participation have yet to be seen. In addition, employment has actually increased for higher salaried positions ($60k or more) whereas employment low wage in low wage ($27k or less) since remains down by more than 23% measured from January 2020 to April of 2021.

The number of small businesses (500 employees or less) that are open for business dropped by 43% from January to April 2020. As of May 2021, the total number is still down nearly 37% from the January 2020 zero point. In the meantime, companies like Amazon, Microsoft, and Tesla (companies who figure prominently within the WEF) increased their market caps in 2020 by the hundreds of billions. Specifically, WEF board member Mark Benioff’s Salesforce increased its market capitalization by a not too shabby $19 billion.

M2 Money Stock

Governments and central banks have responded to the imposed economic downturn with unprecedented amounts of spending and monetary quantitative easing. Though these programs may have had short-term benefit for some people and have certainly benefited companies mentioned above, the increase in US, M2 money supply is totally unprecedented, and the consumer price index has steepened its trajectory in a way that hasn’t been seen since 2008.

In other words, more dollars in people’s hands are purchasing less than they did a year ago. Some experts have asserted that the current inflationary trend is “transitory”, but this prediction is controversial at best and by no means consensus.

What is the solution to all of these economic problems that are deep enough to become severe social problems?

According to Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum, it is time for a Great Reset.

In his own words:

This is our best chance to instigate stakeholder capitalism—and here’s how it can be achieved….

…the world must act jointly and swiftly to revamp all aspects of our societies and economies, from education to social contracts and working conditions. Every country, from the United States to China, must participate, and every industry, from oil and gas to tech, must be transformed.

This “revamping” is what he means by “The Great Reset”. According to Schwab:

The Great Reset agenda would have three main components.

[1] …steer the market toward fairer outcomes. To this end, governments should improve coordination (for example, in tax, regulatory, and fiscal policy), upgrade trade arrangements and create the conditions for a “stakeholder economy”.

“Stakeholder” is a term we hear a lot from the WEF. The so-called “Davos Manifesto 2020” provides the following:

The purpose of a company is to engage all its stakeholders in shared and sustained value creation. In creating such value, a company serves not only its shareholders, but all its stakeholders – employees, customers, suppliers, local communities and society at large. …

A company is more than an economic unit generating wealth. It fulfills human and societal aspirations as part of the broader social system. Performance must be measured not only on the return to shareholders, but also on how it achieves its environmental, social and good governance objectives. …

Klaus’s own message doesn’t include how to enforce the rules of “stakeholder capitalism” other than through government. However prominently displayed on the WEF home page is the following declaration: “The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation.”  An example of the “private” end of creating “the conditions of a “stakeholder economy” would be the diligent work of investment houses like the close WEF associate, Black Rock, ensuring compliance with that objective as they “engage” with the boards of directors of the companies in their massive portfolios.

Continuing with the three components of the Great Reset:

[2] …ensure that investments advance shared goals, such as equality and sustainability. Here, the large-scale spending programs that many governments are implementing represent a major opportunity for progress.

The $2.2 trillion CARES Act and the $900 billion COVID relief package would be specific examples of such “investments”. One might be tempted to say mission accomplished to that, but is enough ever enough?

[3] …harness the innovations of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to support the public good…

The idea of the Fourth Industrial Revolution is essentially Klaus Schwab’s personal invention but routinely spoken about at the WEF and in parroting media as objective truth. Like everything else in the Great Reset, with the exception of COVID, it is not new to 2020.

Again Kaus:

The First Industrial Revolution used water and steam power to mechanize production. The Second used electric power to create mass production. The Third used electronics and information technology to automate production. Now a Fourth Industrial Revolution is building on the Third, the digital revolution that has been occurring since the middle of the last century. It is characterized by a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.

His message to us is that the 4th IR is a brand-new kind of industrial revolution that is totally incomprehensible within the context of any previous technological advancement. It is to be characterized by constant upheaval in the capabilities of businesses and individuals to adapt to its demand for change and presumably only the most visionary of experts will be qualified to understand and “harness” its immense power on our behalf.

Workers will be replaced by machines and the job market will be “increasingly segregated into “low-skill/low-pay” and “high-skill/high-pay” segments”. This will lead to “an increase in social tensions” and explains why “so many workers are disillusioned and fearful that their own real incomes and those of their children will continue to stagnate.”

The technologies of the 4th IR include, “artificial intelligence, robotics, the Internet of Things, autonomous vehicles, 3-D printing, nanotechnology, biotechnology, materials science, energy storage, and quantum computing.”

Once again, an integral aspect of the Great Reset is to “harness” all these innovations for “the public good”, and therefore:

…the response to it must be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders of the global polity, from the public and private sectors to academia and civil society.

And finally:

The Fourth Industrial Revolution…will change not only what we do but also who we are. It will affect our identity and all the issues associated with it: our sense of privacy, our notions of ownership, our consumption patterns, the time we devote to work and leisure, and how we develop our careers, cultivate our skills, meet people, and nurture relationships. It is already changing our health and leading to a “quantified” self…

It is probably this 4thIR aspect of the Great Reset more than any other that many find so alarming. When combining this kind of vision of the future with the 2020 government-imposed lockdowns, mask mandates, and the prospect of vaccine passports, many have justifiably seen flashing red warning signs and made serious efforts at pushing back.

2020 was a shock to almost everyone. For most, it may have been the fear of catching the virus; for others, it has been the fear of impending dystopia. However, 2020 has also been an opportunity to look behind the curtain at the World Economic Forum, whose power is immense in ways most people don’t understand, but probably not as all-powerful as some fear.

Klaus as Dr. Evil

From the initial Great Reset video published by the WEF, many compared Klaus Schwab’s appearance to a Bond villain threatening world destruction if his demands were not met. I certainly applaud anyone who makes Klaus look like a clown, but a Bond villain he is not. He represents an elite class of people whose motive has always been and remains profit: not profit that comes from providing value to those individuals willing to pay for it, but the kind of profit that comes from manipulating government policy and thus the flow of taxpayer and newly printed money in one’s own favor.

In other words, world totalitarianism might be fine with them if they don’t have to play by the rules; but is winning a sudden and near complete game for all the marbles really the best way to line their pockets this quarter, and next? Probably not. I would argue that goal is best accomplished in the manner WEF members have always done it: by making politically palatable (or politically invisible) appeals to high-level politicians to spend their taxpayers’ money with them in ways that help the politicians stay in power or enrich politicians in ways that don’t jeopardize their position.

Klaus’s description of his Fourth Industrial Revolution is certainly designed to dazzle. The 4thIR is either something for us to be scared or enthused by. Either reaction is okay with Klaus. If you’re excited by the 4thIR, maybe you’ll be an early adopter. That’s good for business. If you are scared of the new technology, you’ll support government regulations that will create barriers to entry making it impossible for upstarts to compete with WEF member big tech companies. That’s even better.

We know what they say but how do we know what they mean?

The WEF has numerous hot button topics in its PR toolbelt. On its website, it posts articles and videos expounding on climate change, inequality, the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and so on. Examining any of them slightly below the surface will reveal that the heart of all WEF activity is graft; but one directly related to the GR/4thIR, and that WEF members are very fond of, is the so-called “digital divide”. It is not just a WEF-generated notion but probably a fact that that “many rural and low-income communities around the world, including those in large urban areas, lack reliable, affordable [Internet] access.” This is an opportunity for the WEF to be a good global citizen, highlight the problem and showcase how it’s members on both sides of the public-private partnership are working hard to address the problem for the benefit of all.

One of many such showcases occurred in October of 2020 with a WEF livestream entitled, The Great Reset: Harnessing the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The public side of the partnership was represented by Iván Duque, President of Colombia; Paul Kagame, President of Rwanda; and Benjamin Netanyahu, Prime Minister of Israel. Present were several high-powered representatives of the private sector, as well; but to illustrate the coziness of the “partnership”, I’ll focus of the public end of the livestream and particularly on Netanyahu. This particular WEF virtual meeting was ostensibly an interruption of his efforts to deal directly with COVID-19 in his own country, which was at a peak at that time. Part of his on-pause deliberations was apparently on the “digital divide” within Israel. Internet access becomes very important when the government prohibits people from meeting each other in person, and Netanyahu was showing everyone what he was doing to fill this gap his government essentially had created:

…one of the things we’ve decided to do, just now, five minutes ago is to allocate money to buy computers for these kids so we can cross the digital divide…to give everyone the opportunity.

He then addresses infrastructure by saying:

it’s fibers…that go to some of these remote places…even though we have a tiny country, we have central places where the 5G companies will go and other remote areas where they won’t go because it’s not profitable for them. …[so] what we’re going to do is create a special fund…so we can have fiber reach everyone.

One of the moderators was WEF President, Børge Brende who added the following:

…Israel is one of the most innovative countries in the world but how will you…secure that you’ll stay that way…how will you also, in the years to come, be cutting edge? Is there part of that success you can tell the rest of us?

Netanyahu’s reply:

Invest, invest, invest. Just invest. Invest a lot. Invest in R&D. Invest at the bottom and invest at the top…

A simple Google search for “Israeli 5G companies” yielded the following first page hit: 10 Israeli Companies Banking on 5G Success. The article names ten companies and the major investors are listed for most but not all of the companies. Five out of the ten have investors with some association to the World Economic Forum.

In a technological environment where many believe data is the new oil, is it any wonder that a WEF mouthpiece would say something like “invest, invest, invest”? What if that mouthpiece happens to be a head of state? He has power to direct the money of his taxpayers precisely where these WEF members want it.

In another example, we find that the only thing worth more than data or oil is money itself. Representing the interests of those who create money from thin air and those who are there to catch it when it poofs into existence is central to the WEF mission.

Out of 31 members of the WEF board of trustees, 13 represent high level banking interests from the US, UK, EU, Canada, Japan, Russia and China. Ten of the 13 hold or have held high level government and central banking positions in and out of their respective countries. In addition, eight WEF board members are high level investment firm executives.

Out of the $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Congress allocated $454 billion to be used for Federal Reserve emergency lending programs.

Investment giant BlackRock (same as above) was appointed the sole manager for the two of the lending programs: the Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility (PMCCF) and Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facility (SMCCF). These two were intended to provide access to credit so that companies could maintain business operations during the economic shock of the COVID lockdowns.

BlackRock made its fortune after the 2008 financial crisis in “exchange traded funds” (ETFs). By 2020, it owned over 800 funds with $1.9 trillion in assets under management and was number one of a “big-three” that by 2017 had become the largest shareholder “in almost 90% of S&P 500 firms, including Apple, Microsoft, ExxonMobil, General Electric and Coca-Cola.” In addition “BlackRock owns major interests in nearly every mega-bank and in major media.”

The SMCCF began operating on May 12, 2020. As of May 30, the only purchases made under the BlackRock administered facility “were ETFs, mainly owned by BlackRock itself. Between May 14 and May 20, about $1.58 billion in ETFs were bought through the…SMCCF, of which $746 million or about 47% came from BlackRock ETFs.” BlackRock was using its position as sole manager of the SMCCF to buy ETFs in the name of the Fed owned by BlackRock itself. This gave BlackRock a golden opportunity to self-deal.

Larry Fink is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BlackRock and also sits on the board of trustees at the World Economic Forum. Could the above speak for itself more loudly? Moreover, could this connection as well as many others like it be what Klaus really means when he says: large-scale spending programs that many governments are implementing represent a major opportunity for progress”?

Conclusion

Despite all the hype and machinations, one could even say that there is no Great Reset at all, or as Naomi Klein called it, the “Great Website”, but just a big PR campaign designed to take advantage of the COVID disruptions to pump and push what the WEF has already been doing for decades.

Nothing the WEF is expounding on will bring back the small businesses shuttered due to the lockdowns, and they have no proposals for increasing the labor force participation rate reduced by lockdowns either.

There are some eye-popping advances in technology occurring today to be sure but, the so called Fourth Industrial Revolution is a proprietary invention designed to make people believe they won’t be able to cope with technological change in the future without benevolent interference from government appointed WEF experts. 

Graft at the highest level is what the Great Reset is all about and will remain so long after the Great Reset is as forgotten as Y2K.

World Economic Forum 2020 membership roster via qz.com

The confidential list of everyone attending the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos

By David Yanofsky
Editor of code, visuals, and data
January 20, 2020

From Goldman Sachs bankers to United Nations bureaucrats, delegates have descended on Davos, Switzerland, for the 2020 annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF).

The conference, now in its 50th year, is a perennial draw for the world’s most powerful people to discuss the most pressing issues facing the global economy—or at least make them feel like that’s what they’re doing.
The WEF has publicized the attendees to varying degrees in recent years. At times it has kept the list private, released it in full, or released it while excluding certain groups of people.

This year, the WEF publicly released its list without names of participants and cited the European data-privacy law known as GDPR as the reason for doing so. That list included person-by-person demographic information, not linked to any identifiable information. A separate list with names is provided to press in attendance; it includes instructions not to release the names of attendees.

The information about this year’s attendees was submitted to us anonymously through our Secure Drop portal. By name, it matched the 2,784-person list made available to journalists. However, the information we received contains more detail on attendees than Quartz has ever seen and reveals, in ways never before disclosed, how the WEF catalogs and categorizes the world’s powerful people.

We’ve included two parts of that rubric here, the 1-to-7 categorization of each delegate based on title and affiliation, and a short description of what type of position they currently hold. The World Economic Forum declined to comment on the list or the purpose of the categorization.

Cees ‘t Hart
Chief Executive Officer, Carlsberg Group, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

Khalid Abdulla-Janahi
Chairman, Vision 3, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Rovnag Abdullayev
President, SOCAR (State Oil Company of the Azerbaijan Republic), Azerbaijan
Level 1Top Executive

Basima Abdulrahman
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, KESK Green Building Consulting, Iraq
Level 1Top Executive

David Abney
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, UPS, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Darius Adamczyk
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Honeywell, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Gregory Adams
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Kaiser Permanente, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Timothy Adams
President and Chief Executive Officer, Institute of International Finance (IIF), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Gautam Adani
Chairman, Adani Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Jill Ader
Chairwoman, Egon Zehnder, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Daniel S. Aegerter
Chairman, Armada Investment Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Adeeb Ahamed
Managing Director, Lulu Financial Group, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Sanjiv Ahuja
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Tillman Global Holdings, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Khadim Al Darei
Vice-Chairman and Co-Founder, Al Dahra Holding, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Omar A. Al Futtaim
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Al Futtaim Trading Group, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Abdulla Al Khalifa
Chief Executive Officer, Qatar National Bank, Qatar
Level 1Top Executive

H.H. Sheikh Salman Al Khalifa
Honorary Chairman, Bahrain Petroleum, Bahrain
Level 1Top Executive

Amr Al Madani
Chief Executive Officer, Al-Ula, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Mansoor Bin Ebrahim Al Mahmoud
Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Investment Authority, Qatar
Level 1Top Executive

Talal Al Maiman
Chief Executive Officer, Kingdom Holding, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Khaldoon Al Mubarak
Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, Mubadala, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Mohammed Al Naki
Chairman, Kuwait Industries Co. Holding, Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Nasser Al Nasser
Group Chief Executive Officer, Saudi Telecom Company Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Hussain J. Al Nowais
Chairman, Al Nowais Investments, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Ibrahim Al Omar
Governor, Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA), Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Khaled A. Al Qahtani
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Al Qahtani Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Hesham Al Qassim
Vice-Chairman, Emirates NBD, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Yasir Al Rumayyan
Chairman Of Saudi Aramco, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Tareq Al Sadhan
Chief Executive Officer, Riyad Bank, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Marwan J. Al Sarkal
Executive Chairman, Sharjah Investment and Development Authority – Shurooq, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Yousef Al-Benyan
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Saudi Basic Industries (SABIC), Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Abdulaziz Al-Helaissi
Group Chief Executive Officer, Gulf International Bank (GIB), Bahrain
Level 1Top Executive

Saeed Al-Tayer
Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Ibrahim AlMojel
Chief Executive Officer, Saudi Industrial Development Fund, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Khalid M. AlZubair
Chairman, OMINVEST, Oman
Level 1Top Executive

Sami Alangari
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, AlGihaz, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Laura Alber
Chief Executive Officer, Williams-Sonoma, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Vagit Y. Alekperov
President and Chief Executive Officer, LUKOIL, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Nerio Alessandri
Founder and Chairman, Technogym, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Omar K. Alghanim
Group Chief Executive Officer, Alghanim Industries, Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Mohammed F. Alghanim
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Fouad Alghanim & Sons Group of Companies, Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Yusuff Ali
Chairman and Managing Director, Lulu Group International, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Aamer A. Alireza
Managing Director, Services Group; Director, Xenel Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Hamza B. Alkholi
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hamza Alkholi Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Jeremy Allaire
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Circle, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Patrick Allman-Ward
Chief Executive Officer, Dana Gas, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Meshal Alothman
Director-General, Public Institution for Social Security (PIFSS), Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Cenk Alper
Chief Executive Officer, Sabanci Holding, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Mohammed Alshaya
Executive Chairman, Alshaya Group, Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Marco Alverà
Chief Executive Officer, Snam, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Philippe Amon
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, SICPA Holding, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Cristiano Amon
President, Qualcomm, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Henrik Andersen
Chief Executive Officer, Vestas, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

Eric Anderson
Chairman, Planetary Holdings, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Johan H. Andresen
Chairman, Ferd, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

John Angelicoussis
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Angelicoussis Group, Greece
Level 1Top Executive

Husodo Angkosubroto
Chairman, Gunung Sewu Kencana, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Frank Appel
Chief Executive Officer, Deutsche Post DHL, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Kezevino Aram
Director, Shanti Ashram, India
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-Stéphane Arcis
Chief Executive Officer, TalentSoft, France
Level 1Top Executive

Carlos Julio Ardila
Chief Executive Officer, Ardila Lulle, Colombia
Level 1Top Executive

Nikesh Arora
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Palo Alto Networks, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Tewodros Ashenafi
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Southwest Holdings, Ethiopia
Level 1Top Executive

Isabelle Axelsson
Climate and Environmental Activist, FridaysForFuture, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Claudia Azevedo
Chief Executive Officer, Sonae, Portugal
Level 1Top Executive

Aly Aziz
Chairman, Dashwood Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Fatoumata Ba
Founder and Executive Chair, Janngo, France
Level 1Top Executive

Joseph Bae
Co-President and Co-Chief Operating Officer, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sebastián Bagó
Chief Executive Officer, Grupo Bagó, Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Rahul Bajaj
Chairman, Bajaj Auto, India
Level 1Top Executive

Douglas M. Baker Jr
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ecolab, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Bakker
President and Chief Executive Officer, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Anindya Novyan Bakrie
CEO, President Director, Bakrie & Brothers, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Krishan N. Balendra
Chairman, John Keells Holdings, Sri Lanka
Level 1Top Executive

Stéphane Bancel
Chief Executive Officer, Moderna Therapeutics, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ajay S. Banga
President and Chief Executive Officer, Mastercard, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Lord Barker of Battle
Executive Chairman of the Board of Directors, En+ Group, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Matt Barnard
Chief Executive Officer, Plenty, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Roger Barnett
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Shaklee, USA
Level 1Top Executive

His All-Holiness Patriarch Bartholomew
Archbishop of Constantinople-New Rome and Ecumenical Patriarch
Level 1Top Executive

Farouk A A Bastaki
Managing Director; Chairman of the Executive Committee, Kuwait Investment Authority (KIA), Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Werner Baumann
Chairman of the Board of Management; Chief Executive Officer, Bayer, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Felipe Bayón
Chief Executive Officer, Ecopetrol, Colombia
Level 1Top Executive

Ross Beaty
Chairman, Pan American Silver, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

John M. Beck
Executive Chairman, Aecon Group, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Beh Swan Gin
Chairman, Singapore Economic Development Board, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Alain Bejjani
Chief Executive Officer, Majid Al Futtaim, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Daniel Belfer
Chief Executive Officer, Bank J. Safra Sarasin, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Alan Belfield
Chairman, Arup Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Hazem Ben-Gacem
Co-Chief Executive Officer, Investcorp, Bahrain
Level 1Top Executive

Gary Bencheghib
Founder, Make A Change World, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Marc Benioff
Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Salesforce, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Amanda Bennett
Director, Voice of America, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Dick Benschop
President and Chief Executive Officer, Royal Schiphol Group, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Stanley M. Bergman
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Henry Schein, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Seth F. Berkley
Chief Executive Officer, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, Geneva
Level 1Top Executive

Lysa John Berna
Secretary-General, Civicus: World Alliance for Citizen Participation, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Afsaneh Mashayekhi Beschloss
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, RockCreek, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ulrich L. Bettermann
President and Chairman of the Board, OBO Bettermann, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Aneel Bhusri
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Workday, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeroo Billimoria
Founder, One Family Foundation, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Mohammed Bin Mahfoodh Bin Saad Al Ardhi
Executive Chairman, Investcorp, Bahrain
Level 1Top Executive

Hakan Binbasgil
Chief Executive Officer and Member of the Board, Akbank, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Kumar M. Birla
Group Chairman, Aditya Birla Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Marco Bizzarri
Chief Executive Officer, Guccio Gucci, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Kurt Bjorklund
Co-Managing Partner, Permira Advisers, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Dominic Blakemore
Chief Executive Officer, Compass Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Keith Block
Co-Chief Executive Officer, Salesforce, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Henry Blodget
Chief Executive Officer and Editor-in-Chief, Business Insider, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kathy Bloomgarden
Chief Executive Officer, Ruder Finn, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Allen Blue
Co-Founder and Vice-President, Products, LinkedIn, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Zachary Bogue
Managing Partner, Data Collective, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Yannick Bolloré
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Vivendi, France
Level 1Top Executive

Christel Bories
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Eramet, France
Level 1Top Executive

Candido Botelho Bracher
Chief Executive Officer, Itaú Unibanco, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Ana Botín
Group Executive Chairman, Banco Santander, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Kjerstin Braathen
Chief Executive Officer, DNB, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Sigve Brekke
President and Chief Executive Officer, Telenor Group, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Marcus Brennecke
Managing Partner; Global Co-Head, Equity, EQT Partners, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Heather Bresch
Chief Executive Officer, Mylan, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jim Breyer
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Breyer Capital, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Carlos Brito
Chief Executive Officer, Anheuser-Busch InBev, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Jesper Brodin
Chief Executive Officer, IKEA Retail (Ingka Group), Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

William F. Browder
Chief Executive Officer, Hermitage Capital Management, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Mike Brown
Chief Executive, Nedbank Group, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Nancy Brown
Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Martin Brudermüller
Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors and Chief Technology Officer, BASF, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Amjad Bseisu
Chief Executive, EnQuest, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Thomas Buberl
Chief Executive Officer, AXA, France
Level 1Top Executive

Fares Bugshan
Vice-Chairman, Saudi Bugshan, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Alejandro P. Bulgheroni
Chairman, Pan American Energy, Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Marcos Bulgheroni
Chief Executive Officer, Pan American Energy, Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Sharan Burrow
General Secretary, International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Jane Burston
Executive Director, Clean Air Fund, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Martin Burt
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Fundación Paraguaya, Paraguay
Level 1Top Executive

Oliver Bäte
Chief Executive Officer, Allianz, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Pascal Cagni
Ambassador of France for International Investment; Chairman, Business France, France
Level 1Top Executive

Cai Mingpo
Founder and President, Cathay Capital Private Equity, France
Level 1Top Executive

Francesco Caio
Chairman, Saipem, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Levent Cakiroglu
Chief Executive Officer, Koç Holding, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Ed Camara
Chief Executive Officer, Egon Zehnder International, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

David Cameron
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (2010-2016); President, Alzheimer’s Research UK, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Bertrand Camus
Chief Executive Officer, SUEZ, France
Level 1Top Executive

Demetrio Carceller Arce
Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Disa, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Roger Carr
Chairman, BAE Systems, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Caroline Casey
Founder and Director, Valuable 500, Ireland
Level 1Top Executive

Marc N. Casper
President and Chief Executive Officer, Thermo Fisher Scientific, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Laura M. Cha
Chairman, Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing (HKEx), Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Chaiwat Kovavisarach
President and Chief Executive Officer, Bangchak, Thailand
Level 1Top Executive

Natarajan Chandrasekaran
Chairman, Tata Consultancy Services, India
Level 1Top Executive

Chang Dae-Whan
Chairman and Publisher, Maekyung Media Group, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Chang Seung-Joon
Chief Executive Officer, Maekyung Media Group, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Chansin Treenuchagron
Chief Executive Officer, PTT, Thailand
Level 1Top Executive

Bernard Charlès
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Dassault Systèmes, France
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-Louis Chaussade
Chairman, SUEZ, France
Level 1Top Executive

Milton Cheng
Global Chair, Baker McKenzie, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jonathan Cherki
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Contentsquare, France
Level 1Top Executive

Chew Shou Zi
Chief Financial Officer and President, International, Xiaomi, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Chey Tae-Won
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, SK Group, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

David Chiu
Chairman; Chief Executive Officer, Far East Consortium, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

H. S. Cho
President, Hyosung Group, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Calvin Choi
Chairman and President, AMTD, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Tejpreet Singh Chopra
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Bharat Light & Power (BLP), India
Level 1Top Executive

Niels B. Christiansen
Chief Executive Officer, LEGO Group, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

Victor L. L. Chu
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, First Eastern Investment Group, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Anatoly B. Chubays
Chief Executive Officer, RUSNANO, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Chung Euisun
Executive Vice-Chairman, Hyundai Motor, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Sanford Climan
President, Entertainment Media Ventures, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Boris Collardi
Managing Partner, Pictet Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Steve Collis
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, AmeriSourceBergen, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Veronica Colondam
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, YCAB Foundation, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Patrick Combes
Chairman, Compagnie Financière Tradition, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Iain Conn
Group Chief Executive, Centrica, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Timothy D. Cook
Chief Executive Officer, Apple, USA
Level 1Top Executive

David Coppel Calvo
Chief Executive Officer, Coppel, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Corbat
Chief Executive Officer, Citigroup, Citi, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Philippe Corrot
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Mirakl, France
Level 1Top Executive

Stephen Cotton
General Secretary, International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Jim Coulter
Co-Founder; Co-Chief Executive Officer, TPG, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Elizabeth Cousens
President and Chief Executive Officer, United Nations Foundation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

David Craig
Chief Executive Officer, Refinitiv, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Gerhard Cromme
Chairman of the Advisory Board, Aroundtown, Luxembourg
Level 1Top Executive

Frans Cronje
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, DataProphet, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Cui Weixing
Chairman, Deppon Logistics, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Stacey Cunningham
President and Chief Executive Officer, NYSE, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ray Dalio
Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-Chief Investment Officer, Bridgewater Associates, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Gautam Dalmia
Managing Director, Dalmia Bharat, India
Level 1Top Executive

Kommer Damen
Chairman, Damen Shipyards Group, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Mazen S. Darwazeh
Executive Vice-Chairman; President, Middle East and North Africa, Hikma Pharmaceuticals, Jordan
Level 1Top Executive

Hussain Dawood
Group Chairman, Dawood Hercules, Pakistan
Level 1Top Executive

Asha De Vos
Founder and Executive Director, Oceanswell, Sri Lanka
Level 1Top Executive

Mike DeNoma
Chief Executive Officer, Kanbawza Bank (KBZ), Myanmar
Level 1Top Executive

Thomas DeRosa
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Welltower, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-François Decaux
Co-Chief Executive Officer, JCDecaux, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Alain Dehaze
Chief Executive Officer, Adecco Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Rafael del Pino
Executive Chairman, Ferrovial, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Ron Delia
Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Amcor, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Michael S. Dell
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Dell Technologies, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Steve Demetriou
Chair and Chief Executive Officer, Jacobs, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Spencer Deng
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Dorabot, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Volkmar Denner
Chairman of the Board of Management, Robert Bosch, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

John W.H. Denton
Secretary-General, International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), France
Level 1Top Executive

Oleg V. Deripaska
Founder, Volnoe Delo Foundation, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Carmine Di Sibio
Global Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, EY, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Herbert Diess
Chief Executive Officer, Volkswagen Group, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Jos Dijsselhof
Group Chief Executive Officer, SIX Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Robert L. Dilenschneider
President and Chief Executive Officer, Dilenschneider Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

James Dimon
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, JPMorgan Chase & Co., USA
Level 1Top Executive

Patrick Khulekani Dlamini
Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, Development Bank of Southern Africa, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Kirill Dmitriev
Chief Executive Officer, Russian Direct Investment Fund, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Stefan Doboczky
Chief Executive Officer, Lenzing Group, Austria
Level 1Top Executive

Victor Dodig
President and Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC), Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Hanzade Dogan Boyner
Chairwoman, Hepsiburada, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Edward Lawrence Doheny
Chief Executive Officer, Sealed Air, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Philippe Roger Donnet
Group Chief Executive Officer, Generali, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Dorit Dor
Vice-President, Products, Check Point Software Technologies, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Victor Dosoretz
Permanent Director and Treasurer, Camara Argentina de Comercio (CAC), Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Wiebe Draijer
Chairman of the Managing Board, Rabobank, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Robert Dudley
Group Chief Executive, BP, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Miroslava Duma
Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Future Tech Lab, Pangaia, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Marco Dunand
Chief Executive Officer, Mercuria Energy Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Brian Duperreault
Chief Executive Officer, AIG, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rajkumar Duraiswamy
Chairman and Managing Director, Bharat Petroleum, India
Level 1Top Executive

Thierry Déau
Chief Executive Officer, Meridiam, France
Level 1Top Executive

Richard W. Edelman
Chief Executive Officer, Edelman, USA
Level 1Top Executive

David Edwards
General Secretary, Education International, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Ian Leslie Edwards
Chief Executive Officer, SNC-Lavalin Group, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Annalise Eggimann
Chief Executive Officer, Innosuisse, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

John Ehara
Partner, Unison Capital, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Mark Ein
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Venturehouse Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Börje Ekholm
President and Chief Executive Officer, Ericsson, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Karim El Chiaty
Vice-Chairman, Travco Group International, Egypt
Level 1Top Executive

Jamil El Khazen
Chief Executive Officer, Jamyco Holding, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Johan Eliasch
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Head, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Eduardo S. Elsztain
Chairman, IRSA Inversiones y Representaciones, Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Tony O. Elumelu
Chairman, UBA Group, Nigeria
Level 1Top Executive

Emeka Emuwa
Chief Executive Officer, Union Bank of Nigeria, Nigeria
Level 1Top Executive

Nobuhiro Endo
Chairman of the Board, NEC, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

José Manuel Entrecanales Domecq
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Acciona, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Øyvind Eriksen
President and Chief Executive Officer, Aker, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Murat Erkan
Chief Executive Officer, Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Sergio P. Ermotti
Group Chief Executive Officer, UBS, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Hikmet Ersek
President and Chief Executive Officer, Western Union, USA
Level 1Top Executive

André Esteves
Senior Partner, Banco BTG Pactual, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Martin Eurnekian
Chief Executive Officer, Corporacion America, Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Carolyn Fairbairn
Director-General, Confederation of British Industry (CBI), United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Jeremy Farrar
Director, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Gianrico Farrugia
President and Chief Executive Officer, Mayo Clinic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rayan Fayez
Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Banque Saudi Fransi (BSF), Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Federle
Chief Executive Officer, Forbes, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Grigory Fedorishin
Chief Executive Officer, Novolipetsk Steel (NLMK), Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Álvaro Fernández Garza
Chief Executive Officer, Alfa, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Wilson Ferreira Júnior
Chief Executive Officer, Eletrobras, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Delia Ferreira Rubio
Chair, Transparency International, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Christiana Figueres
Founding Partner, Global Optimism, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Laurence D. Fink
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, BlackRock, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Roland Fischer
Group Chief Executive Officer, Oerlikon, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Jim Fitterling
Chief Executive Officer, Dow, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Emma FitzGerald
Chief Executive Officer, Puma Energy, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Martin L. Flanagan
President and Chief Executive Officer, Invesco, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jay Flatley
Executive Chairman, Illumina, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Gloria Fluxa Thienemann
Vice-Chairman and Chief Sustainability Officer, Iberostar Group, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Sabina Fluxá Thienemann
Vice-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Iberostar Group, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Bo Foged
Chief Executive Officer, ATP, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

William Ford
Chief Executive Officer, General Atlantic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Andras Forgacs
Chief Executive Officer, Modern Meadow, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kerstin Forsberg
Founder and Director, Planeta Océano, Peru
Level 1Top Executive

Christoph Franz
Chairman, Roche, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

André François-Poncet
Group Chief Executive Officer, Wendel, France
Level 1Top Executive

Simon Freakley
Chief Executive Officer, AlixPartners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jacob A. Frenkel
Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Group of Thirty (G30), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rainer-Marc Frey
Chairman, Horizon21, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Friedli
President, Friedli Corporate Finance, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Hanan Friedman
Chief Executive Officer, Bank Leumi Le-Israel, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Adena Friedman
President and Chief Executive Officer, Nasdaq, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Joshua S. Friedman
Co-Founder, Co-Chairman and Co-Chief Executive Officer, Canyon Partners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Michael T. Fries
Chief Executive Officer, Liberty Global, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ric Fulop
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Desktop Metal, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Yoichi Funabashi
Chairman, Asia Pacific Initiative, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Zev Furst
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, First International Resources, USA
Level 1Top Executive

J. Erik Fyrwald
Chief Executive Officer, Syngenta Group, Syngenta, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

M. Shafik Gabr
Chairman and Managing Director, ARTOC Group for Investment and Development, Egypt
Level 1Top Executive

Sridhar Gadhi
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Quantela, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Orit Gadiesh
Chairman, Bain & Company, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Brian Gallagher
President and Chief Executive Officer, United Way Worldwide, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ignacio Garcia Alves
Global Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Arthur D. Little, France
Level 1Top Executive

David Garfield
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Garrison, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Robert C. Garrett
Chief Executive Officer, Hackensack Meridian Health, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Katherine Garrett-Cox
Chief Executive Officer, Gulf International Bank (UK), United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Pascal Gauthier
Chief Executive Officer, Ledger, France
Level 1Top Executive

Pat Gelsinger
Chief Executive Officer, VMware, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Onur Genç
Chief Executive Officer, BBVA, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Patrick J. Geraghty
President and Chief Executive Officer, GuideWell, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Stephane Germain
President and Chief Executive Officer, GHGSat, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-Marc Germain
Chief Executive Officer, Constellium, France
Level 1Top Executive

Sasan Ghandehari
Protector and Chief Adviser, HP Trust, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Fadi Ghandour
Executive Chairman, Wamda Capital, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Don Gips
Chief Executive Officer, Skoll Foundation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ivan Glasenberg
Chief Executive Officer, Glencore, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Daniel Glaser
President and Chief Executive Officer, Marsh & McLennan, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Dipali Goenka
Chief Executive Officer and Joint Managing Director, Welspun India, India
Level 1Top Executive

Blaise Goetschin
Chief Executive Officer, Swiss Bank of Geneva (BCGE), Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Timothy Gokey
President and Chief Executive Officer, Broadridge Financial Solutions, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kenneth Goldman
President, Hillspire, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Pinchas Goldschmidt
Chief Rabbi and President, Conference of European Rabbis, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Carlos Gomes da Silva
Chief Executive Officer, Galp Energia, Portugal
Level 1Top Executive

Gong Yingying
Founder and Chairwoman, Yidu Cloud, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Jane Goodall
Founder, Jane Goodall Institute; UN Messenger of Peace
Level 1Top Executive

Rajesh Gopinathan
Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, Tata Consultancy Services, India
Level 1Top Executive

Roy Gori
President and Chief Executive Officer, Manulife, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

James Gorman
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Morgan Stanley, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Bernardo Gradin
Chief Executive Officer, GranBio Investimentos, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Mallikarjuna Rao Grandhi
Group Chairman, GMR Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Michael D. Granoff
Chief Executive Officer, Pomona Capital, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Mats Granryd
Director-General, GSMA, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Peter T. Grauer
Chairman, Bloomberg, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Mario Greco
Chief Executive Officer, Zurich Insurance Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Lex Greensill
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Greensill, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Herman Gref
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, Sberbank, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Jürgen Griesbeck
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, streetfootballworld, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Fleetwood Grobler
President and Chief Executive Officer, Sasol, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Marc Grynberg
Chief Executive Officer, Umicore, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Ajit Gulabchand
Chairman and Managing Director, HCC, India
Level 1Top Executive

Steven H. Gunby
President and Chief Executive Officer, FTI Consulting, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Guo Guangchang
Chairman, Fosun International, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Sanjeev Gupta
Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, GFG Alliance, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Chander Prakash Gurnani
Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Tech Mahindra, India
Level 1Top Executive

Andrey A. Guryev
Chief Executive Officer, PhosAgro, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Salvador Gómez-Colón
Founder, Light & Hope for Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico
Level 1Top Executive

Pierre Habbard
General Secretary, Trade Union Advisory Committee (TUAC) to the OECD, France
Level 1Top Executive

Torstein Olav Hagen
Chairman, Viking Cruises, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Stein Erik Hagen
Chairman, Orkla, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Rosanne Haggerty
President and Chief Executive Officer, Community Solutions, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Bassim Haidar
Group Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Channel IT, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Samer Haj Yehia
Chairman of the Board, Bank Leumi Le-Israel, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Bandar Hajjar
President, Islamic Development Bank, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

John J. Haley
Chief Executive Officer, Willis Towers Watson, USA
Level 1Top Executive

O. Andreas Halvorsen
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Viking Global Investors, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ralph Hamers
Chief Executive Officer, ING Group, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Kate Hampton
Chief Executive Officer, Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Han Gang
Vice-President, Cedar Holdings Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Otto B. Happel
Chairman, Luserve, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Donald R. Harkleroad
President, Bristol Company, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Njideka Harry
President and Chief Executive Officer, Youth for Technology Foundation (YTF), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kenneth Harvey
Chairman, CLS Bank International, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Richard Hatchett
Chief Executive Officer, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness and Innovations (CEPI), Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Ahmed Heikal
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Qalaa Holdings, Egypt
Level 1Top Executive

Rob Heyvaert
Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Motive Partners, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Takashi Hibino
Chairman of the Board, Daiwa Securities Group, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Toshiaki Higashihara
President and Chief Executive Officer, Hitachi, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Bill Hilf
Chief Executive Officer, Vulcan, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Helianti Hilman
Founder and Chairperson, JAVARA, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Nobuyuki Hirano
Chairman, Member of the Board of Directors, MUFG (Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group), Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Maren Hjorth Bauer
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Katapult Ocean, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Ho Kuen Loon
Group Chief Executive Officer, Fullerton Health, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Eelco Hoekstra
Chairman of the Executive Board and Chief Executive Officer, Royal Vopak, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Christy Hoffman
General Secretary, UNI Global Union, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

André Hoffmann
Chairman, Massellaz, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

John Holland-Kaye
Chief Executive Officer, Heathrow Airport, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Vicki Hollub
President and Chief Executive Officer, Occidental, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Svein Tore Holsether
President and Chief Executive Officer, Yara International, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Klaus Hommels
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Lakestar Advisors, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Yoshito Hori
President, GLOBIS University; Managing Partner, GLOBIS Capital Partners; Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, GLOBIS, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

António Horta-Osório
Chief Executive, Lloyds Banking Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Rupert Howes
Chief Executive Officer, Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Ken Hu
Deputy Chairman and Rotating Chairman, Huawei Technologies, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Jeff Huber
Chief Executive Officer, Home Instead Senior Care, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Antoine Hubert
President and Chief Executive Officer, Ÿnsect, France
Level 1Top Executive

Paul Hudson
Chief Executive Officer, Sanofi, France
Level 1Top Executive

Dana Humaid
Chief Executive, Interfaith Alliance for Safer Communities, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Khalid Humaidan
Chief Executive Officer, Bahrain Economic Development Board, Bahrain
Level 1Top Executive

Brian Humphries
Chief Executive Officer, Cognizant, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Hunter Hunt
Chief Executive Officer, Hunt Consolidated Energy, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Hur Sae-Hong
President and Chief Executive Officer, GS Caltex, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Glenn H. Hutchins
Chairman, North Island, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Hwang Chang-Gyu
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, KT Corporation, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Goldy Hyder
President and Chief Executive Officer, Business Council of Canada, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Masayuki Hyodo
Director, President and Chief Executive Officer, Sumitomo Corporation, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Badr Idrissi
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, ATLAN Space, Morocco
Level 1Top Executive

Andrea Illy
Chairman, illycaffè, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Josu Jon Imaz
Chief Executive Officer, Repsol, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Omar Ishrak
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Medtronic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sergey Ivanov
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Executive Committee, Alrosa, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Jayasree K. Iyer
Executive Director, Access to Medicine Foundation, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Izza
Chief Executive Officer, ICAEW, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Sir Mohammad Jaafar
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Kuwaiti Danish Dairy (KDD), Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Kenneth M. Jacobs
Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer, Lazard, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Badr Jafar
Chief Executive Officer, Crescent Enterprises, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Majid Jafar
Chief Executive Officer, Crescent Petroleum, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Siddharth Jain
Director, INOX Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Anshu Jain
President, Cantor Fitzgerald, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ajay Vir Jakhar
Chairman, Bharat Krishak Samaj (Farmers’ Forum India), India
Level 1Top Executive

Jan Jambon
Minister-President of Flanders, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Hassan Jameel
Deputy President and Vice-Chairman, Abdul Latif Jameel, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Philip Jansen
Chief Executive, BT Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Carlos M. Jarque
Executive Director, International Affairs, Government Relations and Corporate Affairs, América Móvil, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Andy Jassy
Chief Executive Officer, Amazon Web Services, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeremy Jawish
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Shift Technology, France
Level 1Top Executive

Paul Thomas Jenkins
Chair of the Board, OpenText, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Jo Ann Jenkins
Chief Executive Officer, AARP, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Björn Johansson
Chairman, Dr Bjorn Johansson Associates, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Mark Johnson
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Descartes Labs, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Robert A. Johnson
President, Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alan Jope
Chief Executive Officer, Unilever, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Khaled A. Juffali
Chairman, Juffali and Brothers, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Ilham Kadri
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Executive Committee, Solvay, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Joe Kaeser
President and Chief Executive Officer, Siemens, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Robert Charles Kain
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, LunaPBC, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Fritz Kaiser
Chairman, Kaiser Partner, Liechtenstein
Level 1Top Executive

Takehiko Kakiuchi
Member of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer, Mitsubishi Corporation, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Agnes Matilda Kalibata
President, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), Kenya
Level 1Top Executive

Paul-Bernhard Kallen
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hubert Burda Media, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Ajay Kalsi
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Indus Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Baba N. Kalyani
Chairman and Managing Director, Bharat Forge, India
Level 1Top Executive

Jacob Kam Chak-pui
Chief Executive Officer, MTR, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Tihomir D. Kamenov
Founder and Chairman, Commercial League Healthcare Group, Bulgaria
Level 1Top Executive

Shobana Kamineni
Executive Vice-Chairperson, Apollo Hospitals Enterprise, India
Level 1Top Executive

Hemant Kanoria
Chairman, SREI Infrastructure Finance, India
Level 1Top Executive

Sanjeev Kanoria
Chairman, Advinia Healthcare, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Neeraj Kanwar
Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, Apollo Tyres, India
Level 1Top Executive

Scott B. Kapnick
Chief Executive Officer, HPS Investment Partners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Anatoly Karachinsky
President and Chief Executive Officer, IBS Group, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Azza Karam
Secretary-General-elect, Religions for Peace, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alex Karp
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Palantir Technologies, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Shinya Katanozaka
Chairman, All Nippon Airways (ANA), Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Manish Kejriwal
Managing Partner, Kedaara Capital, India
Level 1Top Executive

Declan Kelly
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Teneo, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jason Kelly
Chief Executive Officer, Ginkgo Bioworks, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alfred F. Kelly Jr
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Visa, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Leanne Kemp
Chief Executive Officer, Everledger, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

David Kenny
Chief Executive Officer, Nielsen, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Brad Keywell
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Uptake, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Runa Khan
Founder and Executive Director, Friendship Bangladesh, Bangladesh
Level 1Top Executive

Uday H. Khemka
Vice-Chairman, SUN Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Umesh Khimji
Chief Executive Officer, Ajit Khimji Group, Oman
Level 1Top Executive

Dara Khosrowshahi
Chief Executive Officer, Uber Technologies, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Samer S. Khoury
President, Engineering and Construction, Consolidated Contractors Company (CCC), Greece
Level 1Top Executive

Pascal Kiener
Chief Executive Officer, Banque Cantonale Vaudoise, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

David Kim Young-Hoon
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Daesung Group, Republic of Korea
Level 1Top Executive

Yasushi Kinoshita
Chairman, Development Bank of Japan (DBJ), Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Grandhi Kiran Kumar
Corporate Chairman, GMR Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Emily Kirsch
Founder and Managing Partner, Powerhouse Ventures, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Tsuneo Kita
Chairman and Group Chief Executive Officer, Nikkei, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Stephen Klasko
President and Chief Executive Officer, Jefferson Health, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Stefan Klebert
Chief Executive Officer, GEA Group, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Christian Klein
Co-Chief Executive Officer, SAP, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Charly Kleissner
Co-Founder, Toniic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Carsten Knobel
Chief Executive Officer, Henkel, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Isabelle Kocher
Chief Executive Officer, ENGIE Group, France
Level 1Top Executive

Madhu Koneru
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Kcap Holdings, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Dmitry Konov
Chairman of the Management Board, Sibur, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Jules Kortenhorst
Chief Executive Officer, Rocky Mountain Institute, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Uday S. Kotak
Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Kotak Mahindra Bank, India
Level 1Top Executive

Margery Kraus
Founder and Executive Chairman, APCO Worldwide, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Markus Krebber
Co-Chair of the Board, RWE, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Masakazu Kubota
President and Director-General, Keidanren (Japan Business Federation), Japan
Level 1Top Executive

André Kudelski
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Kudelski Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Rajnish Kumar
Chairman, State Bank of India, India
Level 1Top Executive

Maria Teresa Kumar
President and Chief Executive Officer, Voto Latino, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Nobuaki Kurumatani
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Toshiba, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Nabil R. Kuzbari
President and Chief Executive Officer, Vimpex Handels, Austria
Level 1Top Executive

Andrey Kuziaev
President, ER-Telecom Holding, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Kristina Lagerstedt
Chief Executive Officer, Founder, 1928 diagnostics, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Ramon Laguarta
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, PepsiCo, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Siddhartha Lal
Managing Director, Eicher Motors, India
Level 1Top Executive

Fred Lam
Chief Executive Officer, Airport Authority Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Don Lam
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, VinaCapital, Viet Nam
Level 1Top Executive

Marco Lambertini
Director-General, WWF International, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Christina Lampe-Onnerud
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Cadenza Innovation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Othman Laraki
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Color, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Amina Laraki Slaoui
Co-Founder and Chair, Groupe AMH, Morocco
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Laugharn
President and Chief Executive Officer, Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Matthew Layton
Global Managing Partner, Clifford Chance, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Berel Lazar
Chief Rabbi of the Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Guy LeBlanc
President and Chief Executive Officer, Investissement Québec, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Jennifer 8. Lee
Chief Executive Officer, Plympton, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Lee Kai-Fu
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Sinovation Ventures, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Manfredi Lefebvre d‘Ovidio di Balsorano
Chairman, Silversea SAM, Monaco
Level 1Top Executive

Olivia Leland
Founder and Chief Executive, Co-Impact, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rich Lesser
Global Chief Executive Officer, BCG, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Helena Leurent
Director-General, Consumers International, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

William Lewis
Chief Executive Officer, Dow Jones & Company, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Charles Li
Chief Executive, Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing (HKEX), Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Li Chuyuan
Chairman, Guangzhou Baiyunshan Pharmaceutical, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Lim Chow Kiat
Chief Executive Officer, GIC, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Limbourg
Director-General, Deutsche Welle, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Natan Linder
Chief Executive Officer, Tulip Interfaces, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Don Lindsay
President and Chief Executive Officer, Teck Resources, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Laura Liswood
Secretary-General, Council of Women World Leaders, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Mark Little
President and Chief Executive Officer, Suncor Energy, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Alex Liu
Managing Partner and Chairman, Kearney, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Liu
Founder and Chairman, WI Harper Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Aloke Lohia
Group Chief Executive Officer, Indorama Ventures, Thailand
Level 1Top Executive

James M. Loree
President and Chief Executive Officer, Stanley Black & Decker, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Enrique Lores
President and Chief Executive Officer, HP, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Raymond Loretan
Executive Chairman, Swiss Medical Network, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Georges Lotigier
Chief Executive Officer, Vade Secure, France
Level 1Top Executive

Brandt C. Louie
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, H. Y. Louie Co., Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Patrice Louvet
Chief Executive Officer, Ralph Lauren, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Adrian Lovett
President and Chief Executive Officer, World Wide Web Foundation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeffrey Lu Minfang
Chief Executive Officer, Mengniu Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Pekka Lundmark
President and Chief Executive Officer, Fortum, Finland
Level 1Top Executive

Martin Lundstedt
President and Chief Executive Officer, Volvo, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Marek Lusztyn
Chief Executive Officer, Bank Pekao, Poland
Level 1Top Executive

Howard W. Lutnick
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cantor Fitzgerald, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Mariana Luz
Chief Executive Officer, Maria Cecilia Souto Vidigal Foundation, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Roger Lynch
Chief Executive Officer, Condé Nast, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Busi Mabuza
Chairperson, Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa (IDC), South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Ellen MacArthur
Founder, Ellen MacArthur Foundation, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

David W. MacLennan
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cargill, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Robert MacLeod
Chief Executive, Johnson Matthey, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Mark Machin
President and Chief Executive Officer, CPP Investment Board (CPPIB), Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Michael D. Madnick
Chief Executive Officer, Mountain Philanthropies, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Tadashi Maeda
Governor and Representative Director, Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Nail Maganov
General Director and Chairman of the Management Board, Tatneft, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Chuck Magro
President and Chief Executive Officer, Nutrien, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Anand Mahindra
Chairman, Mahindra Group, India
Level 1Top Executive

Tshepo Mahloele
Chief Executive Officer, Harith General Partners, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Ayla Majid
Managing Director, Financial Advisory Services, Khalid Majid Rehman, Pakistan
Level 1Top Executive

Israel Makov
Chairman, Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, India
Level 1Top Executive

Israfil Mammadov
Chief Executive Officer, State Oil Fund of the Republic of Azerbaijan (SOFAZ), Azerbaijan
Level 1Top Executive

Robert Manfred Jr
Commissioner of Baseball, Major League Baseball (MLB), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Emma Marcegaglia
Chairman, Eni, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Nicolas Mariscal Torroella
Chairman of the Board, Marhnos, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Chris Marlin
President, Lennar, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Eric Martel
Chief Executive Officer, Hydro-Québec, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Geoff Martha
President and Member of the Board, Medtronic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeffrey Martin
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Sempra Energy, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rebecca Masisak
Chief Executive Officer, TechSoup Global, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Bharat Masrani
President and Chief Executive Officer, TD Bank Group, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Frank Mastiaux
Chief Executive Officer, EnBW, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Ajay Mathur
Director-General, Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), India
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Matlare
Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Absa Group, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Busisiwe Mavuso
Chief Executive Officer, Business Leadership South Africa, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Marissa Mayer
Co-Founder, Lumi Labs, USA
Level 1Top Executive

John H. McCall MacBain
Founder, Pamoja Capital, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

David McCormick
Co-Chief Executive Officer, Bridgewater Associates, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeffrey McDermott
Founder and Managing Partner, Greentech Capital Advisors, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeffrey McGregor
Chief Executive Officer, Truepic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

David McKay
President and Chief Executive Officer, RBC (Royal Bank of Canada), Canada
Level 1Top Executive

William L. Meaney
President and Chief Executive Officer, Iron Mountain Information Management, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sanjay Mehrotra
President and Chief Executive Officer, Micron Technology, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Manoj Menda
Corporate Chairman, RMZ, India
Level 1Top Executive

Lorenzo A. Mendoza
Chief Executive Officer, Empresas Polar, Venezuela
Level 1Top Executive

Paolo Merloni
Executive Chairman, Ariston Thermo, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Carlo Messina
Chief Executive Officer, Intesa Sanpaolo, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Howard Meyers
Chairman, Quexco, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Tomislav Mihaljevic
Chief Executive Officer and President, Cleveland Clinic, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Leonid Mikhelson
Chairman of the Management Board, Novatek, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Hiroshi Mikitani
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Rakuten, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

David Miliband
President, International Rescue Committee, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Pascal Millaire
Chief Executive Officer, CyberCube, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Michelle Miller
Co-Founder and Co-Director, Coworker.org, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Anthony Miller
Chief Executive Officer, PAG Japan, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Masumi Minegishi
President, Chief Executive Officer and Representative Director, Recruit Holdings, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Scott Minerd
Global Chief Investment Officer, Guggenheim Partners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rustam Minnikhanov
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Tatneft, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Sunil Bharti Mittal
Chairman, Bharti Enterprises, India
Level 1Top Executive

Lakshmi N. Mittal
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, ArcelorMittal, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Shunichi Miyanaga
Chairman of the Board, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Ken Moelis
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Moelis & Company, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Yousuf Mohamed Al-Jaida
Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Financial Centre (QFC), Qatar
Level 1Top Executive

Elisabeth “Liz” Mohn
Vice-Chairman of the Executive Board, Bertelsmann Stiftung, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Popo Molefe
Chairman, Transnet, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Precious Moloi-Motsepe
Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Motsepe Foundation, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Gustavo Montezano
President, Brazilian Development Bank (BNDES), Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Alexey A. Mordashov
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Severstal, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Blake Moret
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Rockwell Automation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Mario Moretti Polegato
Chairman, Geox, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Jennifer Morgan
Co-Chief Executive Officer, SAP America, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jennifer Morgan
Executive Director, Greenpeace International, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Virginie Morgon
Chief Executive Officer, Eurazeo, France
Level 1Top Executive

Robert E. Moritz
Global Chairman, PwC, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Christine Moseley
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Full Harvest, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sara Moss
Vice-Chairman, Estee Lauder, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Patrice Motsepe
Founder and Executive Chairman, African Rainbow Minerals, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Brian T. Moynihan
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Bank of America, USA; Chair of the World Economic Forum International Business Council
Level 1Top Executive

Pawan Munjal
Chairman, Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Hero MotoCorp, India
Level 1Top Executive

Clarke Murphy
President and Chief Executive Officer, Russell Reynolds Associates, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alan Murray
President and Chief Executive Officer, Fortune, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Gonzalo Muñoz
Co-Founder and Executive President, TriCiclos, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Satya Nadella
Chief Executive Officer, Microsoft, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Koji Nagai
President and Group Chief Executive Officer, Nomura Holdings, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Alberto Nicola Nagel
Chief Executive Officer, Mediobanca, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Haruo Naito
Representative Corporate Officer and Chief Executive Officer, Eisai, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Hiroaki Nakanishi
Executive Chairman, Hitachi, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Vasant Narasimhan
Chief Executive Officer, Novartis, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Alexis Nasard
Group Chief Executive Officer, Bata, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Amin H. Nasser
President and Chief Executive Officer, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Birgitte Nauntofte
Chief Executive Officer, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

Mary Nazzal-Batayneh
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, 17 Ventures, Jordan
Level 1Top Executive

Tshokolo Nchocho
Chief Executive Officer, Industrial Development Corporation of South Africa, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Abidali Neemuchwala
Chief Executive Officer, Wipro, India
Level 1Top Executive

Michael F. Neidorff
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Centene, USA
Level 1Top Executive

John M. Neill
Chairman and Group Chief Executive, Unipart Group of Companies (UGC), United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Shayne Nelson
Group Chief Executive Officer, Emirates NBD Bank, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Antonio Neri
Chief Executive Officer, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Vivi Nevo
President, NV Investments, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Tak Niinami
Chief Executive Officer, Suntory Holdings, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Nandan Nilekani
Chairman, Infosys, India
Level 1Top Executive

Ning Gaoning
Chairman, Sinochem Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Daphna Nissenbaum
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, TIPA, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Njoki Njehu
Director, Daughters of Mumbi Global Resource Center, Kenya
Level 1Top Executive

Cherie Nursalim
Vice-Chairman, Giti Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Nonkululeko Nyembezi
Chairman, Johannesburg Stock Exchange, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Kevin O’Donnell
President and Chief Executive Officer, RenaissanceRe Holdings, Bermuda
Level 1Top Executive

Hitoshi Ochi
President and Chief Executive Officer, Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Maysoun Odeh Gangat
Co-Founder and Director, NISAA Radio, Palestinian Territories
Level 1Top Executive

Patrick Odier
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Bank Lombard Odier & Co., Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala
Chair, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Lubna S. Olayan
Chairwoman of the Executive Committee, Olayan Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

George Oliver
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Johnson Controls, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Oscar Onyema
Chief Executive Officer, Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE), Nigeria
Level 1Top Executive

Ahmet M. Oren
Executive Chairman, Ihlas Holding, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Ambrosie B. Orjiako
Chairman, Seplat Petroleum, Nigeria
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Orszag
Chief Executive Officer, Financial Advisory, Lazard, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Stefan Oschmann
Chairman of the Executive Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Frédéric Oudéa
Chief Executive Officer, Société Générale, France
Level 1Top Executive

Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim
President, Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad (AFPAT), Chad
Level 1Top Executive

Jim Ovia
Chairman, Zenith Bank, Nigeria
Level 1Top Executive

Hiroshi Ozaki
Chairman of the Board, Osaka Gas, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Pedro Padilla Longoria
Chief Executive Officer, Grupo Salinas, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Eduardo Padilla Silva
Chief Executive Officer, FEMSA, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Anisha Padukone
Director, Live Love Laugh Foundation, India
Level 1Top Executive

Deepika Padukone
Founder, Live Love Laugh Foundation, India
Level 1Top Executive

Stephen G. Pagliuca
Co-Chairman, Bain Capital, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Thomas Ronald Palmer
President and Chief Executive Officer, Newmont, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Pan Gang
Chairman, Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Sara Pantuliano
Chief Executive, Overseas Development Institute, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Dimitri Papalexopoulos
Chief Executive Officer, Titan Cement, Greece
Level 1Top Executive

Diana Paredes
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Suade, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Salil S. Parekh
Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, Infosys, India
Level 1Top Executive

Maxim Pasik
Executive Chairman, Watergen, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Torben Möger Pedersen
Chief Executive Officer, PensionDanmark, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

Autumn Peltier
Chief Water Commissioner of the Anishinabek Nation, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Charlotte Pera
President, ClimateWorks Foundation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Javier Perez Tasso
Chief Executive Officer, SWIFT, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Henry Ross Perot Jr
Chairman of the Board, Perot Companies, USA
Level 1Top Executive

David Perry
President and Chief Executive Officer, Indigo Agriculture, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alexey Pertin
Chief Executive Officer, Smart-Holding, Ukraine
Level 1Top Executive

Douglas L. Peterson
President and Chief Executive Officer, S&P Global, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sundar Pichai
Chief Executive Officer, Google, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Evelina Fadil Pietruschka
Chairperson, WanaArtha Life, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Ajay G. Piramal
Chairman, Piramal Enterprises (PEL), India
Level 1Top Executive

Tiago Pitta e Cunha
Chief Executive Director, Oceano Azul Foundation, Portugal
Level 1Top Executive

Sipho M Pityana
Chairman, AngloGold Ashanti, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Juan Jose Pocaterra
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, ViKua, Venezuela
Level 1Top Executive

Paul Polman
Co-Founder and Chair, Imagine, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Adar C. Poonawalla
Chief Executive Officer, Serum Institute of India, India
Level 1Top Executive

Benoit Potier
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Air Liquide, France
Level 1Top Executive

Patrick Pouyanné
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Total, France
Level 1Top Executive

Rishad Premji
Chairman, Wipro, India
Level 1Top Executive

Matthew Prince
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, CloudFlare, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jonas Prising
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, ManpowerGroup, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Penny Pritzker
Founder and Chairman, PSP Partners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Melvyn Pun
Chief Executive Officer, Yoma Strategic Holdings, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

James Quincey
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, The Coca-Cola Company, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Krishnan Rajagopalan
President and Chief Executive Officer, Heidrick & Struggles, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Abi Ramanan
Chief Executive Officer, ImpactVision, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Mauricio Ramos
Chief Executive Officer, USA, Milicom, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Vivek Ranadive
Managing Partner, VR Ventures, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alain Rauscher
Founder, Managing Partner and Chief Executive Officer, Antin Infrastructure Partners, France
Level 1Top Executive

Byju Raveendran
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, BYJU’S, India
Level 1Top Executive

Jonathan Thomas More Reckford
Chief Executive Officer, Habitat for Humanity International (HFH), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ren Zhineng
Chairman of the Board, Chengdu Xingcheng Investment Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Punit Renjen
Global Chief Executive Officer, Deloitte, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Florian Reuter
Chief Executive Officer, Volocopter, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Francisco Reynés
Executive Chairman, Naturgy, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

James T. Riady
Founder and Honorary Chairman, Siloam Hospitals Group, Lippo Group, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Francois Riahi
Chief Executive Officer, Natixis, France
Level 1Top Executive

Anne Richards
Chief Executive Officer, Fidelity International, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Philipp Rickenbacher
Chief Executive Officer, Bank Julius Baer, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Chad Rigetti
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Rigetti Computing, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Neil Rimer
General Partner and Co-Founder, Index Ventures, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Chuck Robbins
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cisco, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Geena Rocero
Founder, GenderProud, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Carlos Rodriguez-Pastor
Chairman, Intercorp, Peru
Level 1Top Executive

Claudio Rodríguez Huaco
Executive Director, Gloria, Peru
Level 1Top Executive

Rosan Perkasa Roeslani
Chairman, Indonesian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (KADIN), Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Emmanuel Roman
Chier Executive Officer, Pacific Invest Management Company (PIMCO), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ginni Rometty
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, IBM, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Guillermo Romo
President and Chief Executive Officer, Grupo Mega, Mexico
Level 1Top Executive

Eric Rondolat
Chief Executive Officer, Signify, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

John Rosanvallon
Special Senior Adviser to the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Dassault Aviation, Dassault Falcon, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Elizabeth Rossiello
Chief Executive Officer and Founder, BitPesa, Senegal
Level 1Top Executive

Michael I. Roth
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Interpublic Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kenneth Roth
Executive Director, Human Rights Watch, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jonathan Rouach
Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, QED-it, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Nawal Roy
Chief Executive Officer, Holmusk, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

David M. Rubenstein
Co-Founder and Co-Executive Chairman, Carlyle Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Andy Rubin
Chair, Pentland Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Joanna Rubinstein
President and Chief Executive Officer, World Childhood Foundation USA, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ravikant Ruia
Founder, Essar, India
Level 1Top Executive

Steve Rusckowski
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Quest Diagnostics, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Ryan
Chief Executive Officer, Qatar Financial Centre Regulatory Authority, Qatar
Level 1Top Executive

Monika Rühl
Chairwoman of the Executive Board, economiesuisse (Swiss Business Federation), Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Gisbert Rühl
Chief Executive Officer, Klöckner & Co, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Rodolphe Saade
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, CMA CGM Group, France
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Sabia
President and Chief Executive Officer, Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Daniel Sachs
Chief Executive Officer, Proventus, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Sadhguru
Founder, Isha Foundation, India
Level 1Top Executive

Arthur Sadoun
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Publicis Groupe, France
Level 1Top Executive

Eldar Saetre
President and Chief Executive Officer, Equinor, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Jacob Safra
Co-Chairman, Banco Safra Brasil, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Sami Sagol
Chairman, Keter Group, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Hussain Sajwani
Chairman, Damac Properties, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Tatsufumi Sakai
President and Group Chief Executive Officer, Mizuho Financial Group, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Kengo Sakurada
Chairman, Keizai Doyukai, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Salvino
President and Chief Executive Officer, DXC Technology, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kim Samuel
Chair and President, Samuel Family Foundation; Director, Samuel Group, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Valter Sanches
General Secretary, IndustriAll Global Union, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Sheryl Sandberg
Chief Operating Officer and Member of the Board, Facebook, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Dilhan Pillay Sandrasegara
Chief Executive Officer, Temasek, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Sands
Executive Director, Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GF), Geneva
Level 1Top Executive

M. Sanjayan
Chief Executive Officer, Conservation International, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Flavia Santoro Trujillo
President, ProColombia, Colombia
Level 1Top Executive

Nobuhiko Sasaki
Chairman, Japan External Trade Organization (JETRO), Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Taisuke Sasanuma
Representative Partner, Advantage Partners, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Dhruv Manmohan Sawhney
Chairman and Managing Director, Triveni Turbine, India
Level 1Top Executive

Anthony Scaramucci
Founder, SkyBridge Capital, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Urs Schaeppi
Chief Executive Officer, Swisscom, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Stefan Schaible
Managing Director, Roland Berger, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Wolf-Henning Scheider
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Management, ZF Friedrichshafen, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Herbert J. Scheidt
Chairman of the Board, Vontobel, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Jennifer Schenker
Founder and Editor-in-Chief, The Innovator, France
Level 1Top Executive

Mark Schneider
Chief Executive Officer, Nestlé, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Abraham Schot
Chief Executive Officer, Audi, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Dan Schulman
President and Chief Executive Officer, PayPal, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Melanie Henriette Schultz van Haegen-Maas Geesteranus
Chief Executive Officer, Porticus, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Hilde Schwab
Chairperson and Co-Founder, Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship
Level 1Top Executive

Klaus Schwab
Founder and Executive Chairman, World Economic Forum
Level 1Top Executive

Stephen A. Schwarzman
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Blackstone, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rob Scott
Chief Executive Officer, Wesfarmers, Australia
Level 1Top Executive

James Scriven
Chief Executive Officer, IDB Invest, Washington DC
Level 1Top Executive

Simon Segars
Chief Executive Officer, ARM, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Sergio Segovia
President, Apex-Brasil (Brazilian Trade and Investment Promotion Agency), Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Zarrar Sehgal
Deputy Chairman, Pathfinder Group, Pakistan
Level 1Top Executive

Dov Seidman
Founder and Chairman, LRN, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Nils Selte
Chief Executive Officer, Canica, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Stefan Seltz-Axmacher
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Starsky Robotics, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jaan Ivar Semlitsch
Chief Executive Officer, Orkla, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-Dominique Senard
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Groupe Renault, France
Level 1Top Executive

Davide Serra
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Algebris Investments, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Christian Sewing
Chief Executive Officer, Deutsche Bank, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Brent Shafer
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Cerner, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Rajiv Shah
President, Rockefeller Foundation, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Marwan Shakarchi
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, MKS (Switzerland), Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Shashi Shanker
Chairman and Managing Director, Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC), India
Level 1Top Executive

Alexander Sharabaika
Chief Financial Officer, PhosAgro, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Vikram Sharma
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, QuintessenceLabs, Australia
Level 1Top Executive

Hashim Shawa
Chairman, Bank of Palestine, Palestinian Territories
Level 1Top Executive

Chris Sheldrick
Chief Executive Officer, what3words, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Jai Shroff
Global Chief Executive Officer, UPL, India
Level 1Top Executive

Rob Shuter
Group President and Chief Executive Officer, MTN Group, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Jose Silva
Chief Executive Officer, Jumeirah Group, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

David Sin
Co-Founder, Group President and Deputy Chairman, Fullerton Health, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Sanjiv Singh
Chairman, Indian Oil, India
Level 1Top Executive

Gurdeep Singh
Chairman and Managing Director, NTPC, India
Level 1Top Executive

Ajay Singh
Chairman and Managing Director, SpiceJet, India
Level 1Top Executive

Shailendra Singh
Managing Director, Sequoia Capital India, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Mohinder Singh Ahluwalia
Chairman, Nishkam Centre, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Sumant Sinha
Chairman and Managing Director, ReNew Power, India
Level 1Top Executive

Regine Sixt
President, International, Sixt, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Keith Skeoch
Chief Executive, Standard Life Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Soren Skou
Chief Executive Officer, A.P. Møller-Maersk, Denmark
Level 1Top Executive

Jared Smith
Chief Executive Officer, Ticketmaster, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Robert F. Smith
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Vista Equity Partners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kevin Sneader
Global Managing Partner, McKinsey & Company, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Jack So Chak-kwong
Chairman, Airport Authority Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Frank Sobey
Chairman, Crombie REIT, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Benedikt Sobotka
Chief Executive Officer, Eurasian Resources Group (ERG), Luxembourg
Level 1Top Executive

David Solomon
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Goldman Sachs, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Brett Solomon
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Access Now, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Masayoshi Son
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Softbank Group, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Soopakij Chearavanont
Chairman, CP Group, Thailand
Level 1Top Executive

Arne Sorenson
President and Chief Executive Officer, Marriott International, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Pascal Soriot
Chief Executive Officer, AstraZeneca, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

George Soros
Chairman and Founder, Soros Fund Management, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alexander Soros
Deputy Chair; Member of the Global Board, Open Society Institute, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sir Martin Sorrell
Executive Chairman, S4Capital, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Chicko Sousa
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Plataforma Verde, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Sandy Speicher
Chief Executive Officer, IDEO, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jes Staley
Group Chief Executive Officer, Barclays, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Francesco Starace
Chief Executive Officer and General Manager, Enel, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Adrian Steckel
Chief Executive Officer, OneWeb, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Andrew Steer
President and Chief Executive Officer, World Resources Institute, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Markus Steilemann
Chief Executive Officer, Covestro, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Eytan Stibbe
Founding Partner, Vital Capital Fund, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Wilfried Stoll
Managing Partner, Festo, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Gunhild Anker Stordalen
Founder and Executive Chair, EAT, Norway
Level 1Top Executive

Jörg Stratmann
Chairman of the Management Board and Chief Executive Officer, MAHLE Group, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Dan Streetman
Chief Executive Officer, TIBCO Software, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Prijono Sugiarto
President and Chief Executive Officer, Astra International, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Malek Sukkar
Chief Executive Officer, averda, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Tarek Sultan Al Essa
Chief Executive Officer and Vice-Chairman of the Board, Agility, Kuwait
Level 1Top Executive

Jane Sun Jie
Chief Executive Officer, Trip.com Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Suphachai Chearavanont
Chief Executive Officer, CP Group, Thailand
Level 1Top Executive

Mukesh Kumar Surana
Chairman and Managing Director, Hindustan Petroleum, India
Level 1Top Executive

Rajeev Suri
President and Chief Executive Officer, Nokia, Finland
Level 1Top Executive

Iqbal Survé
Executive Chairman, Sekunjalo Group, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Paweł Surówka
Chief Executive Officer, PZU, Poland
Level 1Top Executive

Jan Suykens
Chairman of the Executive Committee, Ackermans & van Haaren, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Jun Suzuki
President and Chief Executive Officer; Representative Director of the Board, Teijin, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Nadja Swarovski
Chairperson, Swarovski Foundation; Member of the Executive Board; Head, Corporate Branding and Communication, Swarovski, Austria
Level 1Top Executive

Julie Sweet
Chief Executive Officer, Accenture, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Merlin Bingham Swire
Chairman, Swire Pacific, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Sam Swire
Director, John Swire & Sons, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Feike Sybesma
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Managing Board, Royal DSM, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Jacek Szwajcowski
Chief Executive Officer, Pelion, Poland
Level 1Top Executive

Ignacio Sánchez Galán
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Iberdrola, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Michael Süss
Chairman, Oerlikon, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Kudakwashe Regimond Tagwirei
Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Sakunda Holdings, Zimbabwe
Level 1Top Executive

Jim Taiclet Jr
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, American Tower, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Makoto Takashima
President and Chief Executive Officer, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Sadanobu Takemasu
President and Chief Executive Officer, Representative Director and Chairman of the Board, Lawson, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Ayman Tamer
Chairman and Partner, Tamer Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Top Executive

Anthony Tan
Group Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Grab, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Frank Tang Kui
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, FountainVest Partners (Asia), Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Gillian Tans
Chairwoman, Booking.com, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

William Tanuwijaya
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Tokopedia, Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Jo Taylor
President and Chief Executive Officer, Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Teh Hua Fung
Group President, ONE Championship, Singapore
Level 1Top Executive

Thapana Sirivadhanabhakdi
President and Chief Executive Officer, Thai Beverage, Thailand
Level 1Top Executive

Tidjane Thiam
Chief Executive Officer, Credit Suisse, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Bill Thomas
Global Chairman and CEO, KPMG International
Level 1Top Executive

Mark Thompson
President and Chief Executive, New York Times, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Joseph Thompson
Chief Executive Officer, AID:Tech, Ireland
Level 1Top Executive

Karl-Petter Thorwaldsson
President, Swedish Trade Union Confederation, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Loukina Tille
Climate and Environmental Activist, Climate Strike, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Maxim Timchenko
Chief Executive Officer, DTEK, Ukraine
Level 1Top Executive

Wale Tinubu
Group Chief Executive, Oando, Nigeria
Level 1Top Executive

Fani Titi
Joint Chief Executive Officer, Investec, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Jean Todt
President, Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), France
Level 1Top Executive

Takahito Tokita
President and Representative Director, Fujitsu, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Johan Torgeby
President and Chief Executive Officer, Skandinaviska Enskilda Banken (SEB), Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Carlos Torres Vila
Chairman, BBVA, Spain
Level 1Top Executive

Mamadou Toure
Founder, Africa 2.0 Foundation, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Ned Tozun
Chief Executive Officer, d.light, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Eric Trappier
Chief Executive Officer, Dassault Aviation, France
Level 1Top Executive

Alan Trefler
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Pegasystems, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-Pascal Tricoire
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Schneider Electric, France
Level 1Top Executive

Ponsi Trivisvavet
Chief Executive Officer and Director, Inari Agriculture, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Richard L. Trumka
President, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Karen I. Tse
Chief Executive Officer, International Bridges to Justice, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Simpiwe K. Tshabalala
Chief Executive Officer, Standard Bank Group, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Royke Tumilaar
Chief Executive Officer, Bank Mandiri (Persero), Indonesia
Level 1Top Executive

Tiger Tyagarajan
President and Chief Executive Officer, Genpact International, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Torbjörn Törnqvist
Chief Executive Officer, Gunvor, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Lance Uggla
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, IHS Markit, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Christian Ulbrich
Global Chief Executive Officer; President, JLL, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Kevin Ulrich
Chief Executive Officer, Anchorage Capital Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alisher B. Usmanov
Founder, USM Holdings, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Hans Van Bylen
President, Verband der Chemischen Industrie (VCI), Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Rolly Van Rappard
Managing Partner, CVC Capital Partners, Luxembourg
Level 1Top Executive

Jacques Vandermeiren
Chief Executive Officer, Antwerp Port Authority, Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Yossi Vardi
Chairman, International Technologies, Israel
Level 1Top Executive

Mariana Vasconcelos
Chief Executive Officer, Agrosmart, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Carl Vause
Chief Executive Officer, Soft Robotics, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Shamsheer Vayalil
Chairman and Managing Director, VPS Healthcare, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Victor F. Vekselberg
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Skolkovo Foundation, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Hans Vestberg
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Verizon Communications, USA
Level 1Top Executive

C. Vijayakumar
President and Chief Executive Officer, HCL Technologies, India
Level 1Top Executive

Luca Visentini
General Secretary, European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC), Belgium
Level 1Top Executive

Arkady Volozh
Chief Executive Officer, Yandex, Russian Federation
Level 1Top Executive

Peter Voser
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Michel Vounatsos
Chief Executive Officer, Biogen, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Marc Walder
Chief Executive Officer, Ringier, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Jacob Wallenberg
Chairman, Investor, Sweden
Level 1Top Executive

Wan Zulkiflee Wan Ariffin
President and Group Chief Executive Officer, PETRONAS (Petroliam Nasional), Malaysia
Level 1Top Executive

Cher Wang
Founder and Chairman, HTC, Taiwan, China
Level 1Top Executive

Kevin Washington
President and Chief Executive Officer, YMCA of the US, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-Baptiste Wautier
Partner and Member of the Executive Committee, BC Partners, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Christophe Weber
President and Chief Executive Officer, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Andrew S. Weinberg
Founder, Managing Partner and Chief Executive Officer, Brightstar Capital Partners, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Jeremy Weir
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Trafigura Group, Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Joachim Wenning
Chief Executive Officer, Munich Re, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Noel White
President and Chief Executive Officer, Tyson Foods, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Darryl White
Chief Executive Officer, BMO Financial Group, Canada
Level 1Top Executive

Theresa Whitmarsh
Executive Director, Washington State Investment Board, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Clay C. Williams
President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, National Oilwell Varco (NOV), USA
Level 1Top Executive

Sarah Williamson
Chief Executive Officer, FCLT Global, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Bill Winters
Group Chief Executive Officer, Standard Chartered Bank, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

Michael K. Wirth
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Chevron, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Lisa Witter
Co-Founder and Executive Chairperson, Apolitical, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Lauren Woodman
Chief Executive Officer, NetHope, USA
Level 1Top Executive

John Wren
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Omnicom Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Alexander R. Wynaendts
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Executive Board, Aegon, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Ken Xie
Founder, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Fortinet, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Xu Niansha
Chairman, Poly Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Linda Yaccarino
Chairman, Advertising and Partnerships, NBCUniversal, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Ion Yadigaroglu
Managing Partner, Capricorn Investment Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Arzuhan Dogan Yalçindag
Member of the Board, Dogan Group of Companies, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Tatsuo Yasunaga
President and Chief Executive Officer, Mitsui & Co., Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Kenichiro Yoshida
President and Chief Executive Officer, Sony, Japan
Level 1Top Executive

Glenn Youngkin
Co-Chief Executive Officer, Carlyle Group, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Albert “Ambet” Emilio Yuson
General Secretary, Building and Wood Workers’ International (BWI), Switzerland
Level 1Top Executive

Matthias Zachert
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Management, LANXESS, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Nadav Zafrir
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Team8, USA
Level 1Top Executive

Saul Zang
Co-Chairman, Banco Hipotecario, Argentina
Level 1Top Executive

Antonio Zappulla
Chief Executive Officer, Thomson Reuters Foundation, Thomson Reuters, United Kingdom
Level 1Top Executive

H. Cuneyd Zapsu
Founder and Chairman, Cuneyd Zapsu Danismanlik, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Aziz G. Zapsu
Chairman, Azizler Holding, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Fernando Zavala
Chief Executive Officer, Intercorp, Peru
Level 1Top Executive

Zeng Qinghong
Chairman, Guangzhou Auto Industry Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Daniel Zhang
Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Alibaba Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Jiachen
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Guangzhishu Technology, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Jin
Chairman of the Board, Cedar Holdings Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Lei
Chief Executive Officer, Envision Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Yi-Chen
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, CITIC Capital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Yiming
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, ByteDance, Cayman Islands
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Zhaoxing
Chairman, Guangzhou Yuexiu Holding, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Zhang Zongyan
Chairman, China Railway Group (CREC), People’s Republic of China
Level 1Top Executive

Martin Zielke
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Commerzbank, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem
Group Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, DP World, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Top Executive

Veronique de Bruijn
Chief Executive Officer, Photanol, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Theo de Jager
President, World Farmers’ Organisation, Italy
Level 1Top Executive

Octavio de Lazari Junior Jr
Chief Executive Officer, Banco Bradesco, Brazil
Level 1Top Executive

Arnaud de Puyfontaine
Chief Executive Officer, Vivendi, France
Level 1Top Executive

Alexandre de Rothschild
Executive Chairman, Rothschild & Co, France
Level 1Top Executive

Ben van Beurden
Chief Executive Officer, Royal Dutch Shell, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Jean-François van Boxmeer
Chairman of the Executive Board and Chief Executive Officer, HEINEKEN, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Bob van Dijk
Chief Executive Officer, Naspers, South Africa
Level 1Top Executive

Kees van Dijkhuizen
Chief Executive Officer, ABN AMRO, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Frans van Houten
Chief Executive Officer, Royal Philips, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Coen van Oostrom
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, EDGE Technologies, OVG Real Estate, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Cornelis van Zadelhoff
Founder, Zadelhoff Beheer, Netherlands
Level 1Top Executive

Stefan von Holtzbrinck
Chief Executive Officer, Holtzbrinck Publishing Group, Germany
Level 1Top Executive

H.S.H. Prince Maximilian von und zu Liechtenstein
Chief Executive Officer, LGT, Liechtenstein
Level 1Top Executive

Ebru Özdemir
Chairperson of the Board, Limak Holding, Turkey
Level 1Top Executive

Kristalina Georgieva
Managing Director, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Washington DC
Level 1Head of Top International Org.

Antonio Guterres
Secretary-General, United Nations, New York
Level 1Head of Top International Org.

Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo
President of the Republic of Ghana
Level 1Head of State

H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco
Prince of Monaco
Level 1Head of State

Ilham Aliyev
President of the Republic of Azerbaijan
Level 1Head of State

H.S.H. Hereditary Prince Alois of Liechtenstein
Hereditary Prince of Liechtenstein
Level 1Head of State

Nechirvan Barzani
President of the Kurdistan Regional Government
Level 1Head of State

Khaltmaagiin Battulga
President of Mongolia
Level 1Head of State

Andrzej Duda
President of Poland
Level 1Head of State

Ivan Duque
President of Colombia
Level 1Head of State

Mohammad Ashraf Ghani
President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan
Level 1Head of State

Egils Levits
President of Latvia
Level 1Head of State

Mokgweetsi Eric Keabetswe Masisi
President of Botswana
Level 1Head of State

H.M. Mathilde, Queen of Belgium
Queen of Belgium
Level 1Head of State

Lenin Moreno Garcés
President of Ecuador
Level 1Head of State

H.M. Queen Máxima of the Netherlands
Queen of the Netherlands; United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Advocate for Inclusive Finance
Level 1Head of State

Gitanas Nausėda
President of Lithuania
Level 1Head of State

Filipe Jacinto Nyusi
President of Mozambique
Level 1Head of State

H.M. King Philippe of Belgium
King of Belgium
Level 1Head of State

Kais Saied
President of Tunisia
Level 1Head of State

Barham Salih
President of Iraq
Level 1Head of State

Macky Sall
President of Senegal
Level 1Head of State

Armen Sarkissian
President of Armenia
Level 1Head of State

Simonetta Sommaruga
President of the Swiss Confederation and Federal Councillor for the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications
Level 1Head of State

Hashim Thaci
President of Kosovo (This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with United Nations Security Council resolution 1244 (1999) and the International Court of Justice Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence)
Level 1Head of State

President Donald J. Trump
President of the United States of America
Level 1Head of State

Felix Tshisekedi
President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Level 1Head of State

Aleksandar Vučić
President of Serbia
Level 1Head of State

Volodymyr Zelenskyy
President of Ukraine
Level 1Head of State

Omar Al Razzaz
Prime Minister of Jordan and Minister of Defence
Level 1Head of Government

Xavier Bettel
Prime Minister and Minister for Communications, Media and Digitization of Luxembourg
Level 1Head of Government

Boyko Borissov
Prime Minister of Bulgaria
Level 1Head of Government

Ana Brnabić
Prime Minister of Serbia
Level 1Head of Government

Giuseppe Conte
Prime Minister of Italy
Level 1Head of Government

Laurentino Cortizo Cohen
President of Panama
Level 1Head of Government

Giorgi Gakharia
Prime Minister of Georgia
Level 1Head of Government

Adrian Hasler
Prime Minister of Liechtenstein
Level 1Head of Government

Imran Khan
Prime Minister of Pakistan
Level 1Head of Government

Sebastian Kurz
Federal Chancellor of Austria
Level 1Head of Government

Lee Hsien Loong
Prime Minister of Singapore
Level 1Head of Government

Sanna Marin
Prime Minister of Finland
Level 1Head of Government

Angela Merkel
Federal Chancellor of Germany
Level 1Head of Government

Charles Michel
President of the European Council
Level 1Head of Government

Kyriakos Mitsotakis
Prime Minister of Greece
Level 1Head of Government

Mateusz Morawiecki
Prime Minister of Poland
Level 1Head of Government

Andrej Plenković
Prime Minister of Croatia
Level 1Head of Government

Jüri Ratas
Prime Minister of Estonia
Level 1Head of Government

Mark Rutte
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
Level 1Head of Government

David Maria Sassoli
President of the European Parliament
Level 1Head of Government

Mohammad Ibrahim Shtayyeh
Prime Minister of the Palestinian National Authority
Level 1Head of Government

Erna Solberg
Prime Minister of Norway
Level 1Head of Government

Pedro Sánchez
Prime Minister of Spain
Level 1Head of Government

Sophie Wilmès
Prime Minister of Belgium
Level 1Head of Government

Ursula von der Leyen
President of the European Commission
Level 1Head of Government

Marjan Šarec
Prime Minister of Slovenia
Level 1Head of Government

Faisal Abbas
Editor-in-Chief, Arab News, Saudi Arabia
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Stephen J. Adler
Editor-in-Chief, Reuters, Canada
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Sven Afhüppe
Editor-in-Chief, Handelsblatt, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Frank Aigbogun
Editor-in-Chief, Business Day, Nigeria
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Mina Al-Oraibi
Editor-in-Chief, The National, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Ricardo Avila
Editor-in-Chief, Portafolio, Colombia
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Stefan Barmettler
Editor-in-Chief, HandelsZeitung, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Martin Baron
Executive Editor, Washington Post, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Nicolas Barré
Editor-in-Chief, Les Echos, France
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Stéphane Benoit-Godet
Editor-in-Chief, Le Temps, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Luzi Bernet
Editor-in-Chief, NZZ am Sonntag, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Amy Bernstein
Editor, Harvard Business Review Magazine, Harvard Business Review Group, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Shereen Bhan
Managing Editor, CNBC-TV18, India
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Johannes Boie
Editor-in-Chief, Die Welt, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Gerald Braunberger
Publisher, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Stephen Brown
Editor-in-Chief, Politico, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

João F. Caminoto
Director, Journalism, Grupo Estado, Brazil
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Nicholas Carlson
Global Editor-in-Chief, Business Insider, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

John Casey
Senior Vice-President, International News and Programming, CNBC, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Juliana Chan
Chief Executive Officer, Wildtype Media Group, Singapore
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Luciana Coelho
Senior Editor, Folha de São Paulo, Brazil
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Robert Cox
Global Editor-in-Chief, Reuters, Canada
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Noel Curran
Director-General, European Broadcasting Union (EBU), Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Kevin Delaney
Founding Editor, Quartz Media, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Christian Dorer
Editor-in-Chief, Blick-Gruppe, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Aurélia End
Chief Editor, Global Economics, Agence France Presse, France
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Edward Felsenthal
Editor-in-Chief, TIME, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Patrick Foulis
Bureau Chief, New York, The Economist, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Federico Fubini
Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Corriere Della Sera, Italy
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Akio Fujii
Senior Editorial Writer, Nikkei, Japan
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Alicia Gonzalez Vicente
Correspondent, International Economy, El País, Spain
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Serge Guertchakoff
Editor-in-Chief, Bilan, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Eric Gujer
Editor-in-Chief, Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ), Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Shekhar Gupta
Editor-in-Chief, ThePrint, India
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Sven Gösmann
Editor-in-Chief, DPA – Deutsche Presse Agentur, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Anthony William Hall of Birkenhead
Director-General, BBC News, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

James Harding
Co-Founder and Editor, Tortoise Media, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Julien Hawari
Editor-in-Chief, Trends, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

He Wei
President and Editor-in-Chief, Securities Times, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Uwe J. Heuser
Chief Publisher, ZEIT-Geld; Economic and Business Editor, Die Zeit, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Joel Hills
Business and Economics Editor, ITV News, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Tetsuji Ida
Senior Staff Writer and Editorial Writer, Kyodo News, Japan
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Adi Ignatius
Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Business Review Group, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Faisal Islam
Political Editor, Sky News, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Barun Jha
National Editor, Press Trust of India, India
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Hilary Joffe
Contributing Editor, Business Times, South Africa
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Stefan Kaiser
Deputy Head, Business and Economics Desk, Spiegel Online, Der Spiegel, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Tinatin Kandelaki
General Producer, Match TV, Russian Federation
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Manuela Kasper-Claridge
Head, Business, Science, Environment; Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Deutsche Welle, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Roula Khalaf
Editor, Financial Times, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Carsten Knop
Editor-in-Chief, Digital Products, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Tanit Koch
Editor-in-Chief, RTL; Managing Director, N-TV, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Wolfgang Krach
Editor-in-Chief, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Hiroko Kuniya
Special Editor-in-Chief, GLOBE, Asahi Shimbun, Japan
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Randall Lane
Chief Content Officer, Forbes, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Clifton Leaf
Editor-in-Chief, Fortune, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Ellana Lee
Senior Vice-President and Managing Editor, CNN International, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Gideon Lichfield
Editor-in-Chief, MIT – Technology Review, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Uni Zulfiani Lubis
Editor-in-Chief, IDN Times, Indonesia
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Philippe Mabille
Editor, Tribune, France
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Georg Meck
Senior Business Editor, Frankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Miriam Meckel
Founding Publisher, ada, Handelsblatt, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

John Micklethwait
Editor-in-Chief, Bloomberg, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Zanny Minton Beddoes
Editor-in-Chief, The Economist, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Lukanyo Mnyanda
Editor, Business Day, South Africa
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Maurizio Molinari
Editor-in-Chief, Stampa, Italy
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Matthew Murray
Editor-in-Chief, Wall Street Journal, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Patrik Müller
Editor-in-Chief, CH Media, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Yoichi Nishimura
Managing Director, Asahi Shimbun, Japan
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Fabrice Node-Langlois
Editor-in-Chief, International Economics, Le Figaro, France
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Rainer Nowak
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher, Die Presse, Austria
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

George Osborne
Editor, Evening Standard, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Aroon Purie
Chairman and Editor-in-Chief, India Today Group, India
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Kalli Purie Bhandal
Vice-Chairperson and Managing Director, India Today Group, India
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Bernard Rappaz
Head, News, Swiss Television RTS, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Guy Rolnik
Founding Editor-in-Chief, The Marker; Deputy Publisher, Ha’aretz Group, Ha’aretz-TheMarker Daily Newspaper, Israel
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Gideon Rose
Editor, Foreign Affairs, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Eric Rubin
Editor-in-Chief, New England Journal of Medicine, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Arthur Rutishauser
Editor-in-Chief, Tages-Anzeiger, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Chantal Saliba
Senior Anchor, Sky News Arabia, United Arab Emirates
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Jose Manuel Sanz Mingote
Director, International Relations, Agencia EFE, Spain
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Sergio Sarmiento
Editor-in-Chief and Vice-President, Editorial Board, TV Azteca, Mexico
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Andreas Schaffner
Editor-in-Chief, CNNMoney Switzerland, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Dirk Schütz
Editor-in-Chief, BILANZ, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Andy Serwer
Editor-in-Chief, Yahoo Finance, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Pranjal Sharma
Contributing Editor, Businessworld, India
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Alyson Shontell Lombardi
Editor-in-Chief, Business Insider, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Magdalena Skipper
Editor-in-Chief, Nature, United Kingdom
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Ben Smith
Editor-in-Chief, Buzzfeed, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Jonathan Tepperman
Editor-in-Chief, Foreign Policy Group, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Nicholas Thompson
Editor-in-Chief, Wired Magazine, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Jean-Marc Vittori
Editor, Les Echos, France
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

David Walmsley
Editor-in-Chief, Globe and Mail, Canada
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Nathalie Wappler
Head and Chief Executive Officer, Swiss Radio and Television SRF, Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Yves Wegelin
Co-Editor-in-Chief, Die Wochenzeitung (WOZ), Switzerland
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Jochen Wegner
Editor-in-Chief, Zeit Online, Germany
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Stuart Williams
Deputy Chief, International Desk, Agence France Presse, France
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Peter Wolodarski
Editor-in-Chief, Dagens Nyheter, Sweden
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Justin Worland
Energy and Environment Correspondent, TIME, USA
Level 1Editor-in-Chief

Marin Alsop
Music Director, Baltimore Symphony, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Gina Badenoch
Founder, Capaxia, United Kingdom
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Caroline Baumann
Director, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Romero Britto
Artist and President, Britto Central, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Molly Burke
YouTuber, Motivational Speaker, Author and Commercial Model, Molly Burke Corp., USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy
Chief Executive Officer, SOC Films, Pakistan
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Christophe Danzin
Director, Development, LUMA Arles, France
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Micheline Engel
Philanthropist, France
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Martin Engström
Founder and Executive Director, Verbier Festival, Switzerland
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Cruz Erdmann
Photographer, New Zealand
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Peter B. Gabriel
Founder, Real World, United Kingdom
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Theaster Gates
Founder and Director, Rebuild Foundation,
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Mehdi Ghadyanloo
Artist, Painter and Public Artist, Islamic Republic of Iran
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Thando Hopa
Diversity Advocate and International Model, Thando Hopa Media, South Africa
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Jin Xing
Choreographer and Founder, Jin Xing Dance Theatre Shanghai, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Wanuri Kahiu
Filmmaker, Afrobubblegum, Kenya
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Angelique Kidjo
Musician and UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Fernando Laposse
Product and Material Designer, United Kingdom
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Julia Lohmann
Designer and Researcher, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Yo-Yo Ma
Cellist, Sound Postings, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Cara Mertes
Project Director, Moving Image Strategies, Ford Foundation, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Sputniko! Ozaki
Associate Professor, Tokyo University of the Arts, Japan
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Platon
Photographer and Founder, People’s Portfolio, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Winslow Porter
Director, Producer and Creative Technologist, Virtual Reality Films, New Reality Co., USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Daan Roosegaarde
Artist and Innovator, Studio Roosegaarde, Netherlands
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Nico Rosberg
Greentech Entrepreneur and F1 2016 World Champion, Monaco
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Anant Singh
Producer, Videovision Entertainment, South Africa
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Philip Tinari
Director and Chief Executive Officer, UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Samuel Van Aken
Contemporary Artist, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Cathleen Van Aken
Contemporary Artist, Van Aken Studios, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Lynette Wallworth
Artist, Studio Wallworth, Australia
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Micah White
Co-Creator, Occupy, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Harry Yeff
Artist and Director, Experience Design, Reeps100 Studios, United Kingdom
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Andria Zafirakou
Teacher, Arts and Textile, Alperton Community School, United Kingdom
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Milica Zec
Director, Film and Mixed Reality, New Reality Co., USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

will.i.am
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, I.AM.PLUS, USA
Level 1Arts, Culture & Sports

Scott Aaronson
David J. Bruton Centennial Professor of Computer Science; Director, Quantum Information Center, University of Texas, Austin, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Henny Admoni
Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Conny Aerts
Professor, University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

David B. Agus
Professor of Medicine and Engineering; Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine of USC, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Nadia Al-Sakkaf
Gender and Politics Researcher, University of Reading, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

John R. Allen
President, Brookings Institution, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Julie Battilana
Alan L. Gleitsman Professor of Social Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Mary Beard
Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Carol Becker
Dean of Faculty, School of the Arts, Columbia University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Genevieve Bell
Distinguished Professor; Director, 3A Institute, Australian National University, Australia
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Rwitwika Bhattacharya-Agarwal
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Swaniti Initiative, India
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Julian Birkinshaw
Professor of Strategic and International Management, London Business School, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Julie Bishop
Chancellor, Australian National University, Australia
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Tony Blair
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1997-2007); Founder, Tony Blair Institute for Global Change, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jason Bordoff
Founding Director, Columbia University Center on Global Energy Policy; Professor of Professional Practice in International and Public Affairs, School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), Columbia University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Chad Bown
Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Erik Brynjolfsson
Schussel Family Professor; Director, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy, MIT – Sloan School of Management, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

William Burns
President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ana Mari Cauce
President, University of Washington, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Sarah Chan
Chancellor’s Fellow, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

John Chipman
Director-General and Chief Executive, International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

James Cockayne
Director, Centre for Policy Research, United Nations University, New York
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Paul Collier
Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Francis S. Collins
Director, National Institutes of Health, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Gretchen Daily
Bing Professor in Environmental Science, Stanford University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Adriana De Palma
Co-Investigator Researcher, Natural History Museum, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Robbert Dijkgraaf
Director and Leon Levy Professor, Institute for Advanced Study, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Yuan Ding
Vice-President and Dean, China Europe International Business School (CEIBS), People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Paula J. Dobriansky
Senior Fellow, Future of Diplomacy Project, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Victor Dzau
President, National Academy of Medicine, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Sylvia Earle
Creator, Mission Blue Foundation, National Geographic Society, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Bernhard Ehrenzeller
President-elect, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Kevin Michael Esvelt
Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Fan Gang
Director, National Economic Research Institute, China Reform Foundation, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Niall Ferguson
Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Mauro Ferrari
President, European Research Council, Belgium
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Fionn Ferreira
Scientist, Netherlands
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Yves Flückiger
Rector, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Suzanne Fortier
Principal and Vice-Chancellor, McGill University, Canada
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Alice Gast
President, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Shafi Goldwasser
Director, Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing; Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Makoto Gonokami
President, University of Tokyo, Japan
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Nik Gowing
Founder and Director, Thinking Unthinkable, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Adam Grant
Saul P. Steinberg Professor of Management and Psychology, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Lynda Gratton
Professor of Management Practice, London Business School, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Judith Grisel
Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Bucknell University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Victor Halberstadt
Professor of Economics, Leiden University, Netherlands
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jodi Halpern
Professor of Bioethics and Medical Humanities, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Hao Ping
President, Peking University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Yuval Noah Harari
Professor, Department of History, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jane Harman
Director, President and Chief Executive Officer, Wilson Center, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Akira Haseyama
President, Keio University, Japan
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jonathan Haskel
Professor of Economics, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ricardo Hausmann
Director, Center for International Development; Professor of Practice of Economic Development, Harvard University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Michael Hengartner
President, University of Zurich, Switzerland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Richard Herrington
Head, Earth Sciences Department, Natural History Museum, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Mike Horn
Professional Explorer, Switzerland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Angel Hsu
Assistant Professor, Yale-NUS College, Singapore
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Huang Yiping
Deputy Dean, National School of Development, Peking University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Farnam Jahanian
President, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jin Keyu
Professor of Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Krithi Karanth
Chief Conservation Scientist and Director, Centre for Wildlife Studies, India
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Frederick Kempe
President and Chief Executive Officer, Atlantic Council, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

John F. Kerry
Distinguished Fellow for Global Affairs, Yale University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Alexei Khokhlov
Vice-President, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russian Federation
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Sandra Knapp
Merit Researcher, Natural History Museum, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Zvika Krieger
Head of Technology Policy and Partnerships; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Frances “Ming” Kuo
Associate Professor, University of Illinois, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ann Kurth
Dean, School of Nursing, Yale University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Rachel Kyte
Dean, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Heidi Larson
Professor of Anthropology, Risk and Decision Science, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jim Leape
William and Eva Price Senior Fellow, Woods Institute; Co-Director, Center for Ocean Solutions, Stanford University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ronaldo Lemos
Director, Institute for Technology & Society, Brazil
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Mark Leonard
Director, European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR), United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Hao Li
Associate Professor of Computer Science, University of Southern California (USC), USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Lin Boqiang
Dean, China Institute for Studies in Energy Policy, Xiamen University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Fyodor Lukyanov
Director, Research, Valdai Discussion Club, Russian Federation
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ma Jun
Director, Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Kishore Mahbubani
Distinguished Fellow, Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Johanna Mair
Professor of Organization, Strategy and Leadership, Hertie School, Germany
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Renée Mauborgne
Professor of Strategy and Management, INSEAD, France
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Colin Mayer
Peter Moores Professor of Management Studies, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Mariana Mazzucato
Professor of Economics of Innovation and Public Value; Founder and Director, Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose, University College London (UCL), United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Andrew McAfee
Co-Director and Co-Founder, MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy; Principal Research Scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Douglas McCauley
Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

William McDonough
Adjunct Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Joël Mesot
President, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ilian Mihov
Dean, INSEAD, Singapore
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ernest J. Moniz
Co-Chair and Chief Executive Officer, Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Dambisa Moyo
Global Economist, Mildstorm Group, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Geoff Mulgan
Chief Executive, Nesta, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Natasha Mwansa
Child and Women’s Rights Advocate and Activist, Media Network on Child Rights and Development, Zambia
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Neha Narula
Director, Digital Currency Initiative, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Alsharif Nasser bin Nasser
Managing Director, Middle East Scientific Institute for Security, Jordan
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jane Nelson
Director, Corporate Responsibility Initiative, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Robin Niblett
Director, Chatham House, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Carlos Afonso Nobre
Director, Research, Brazilian Academy of Sciences, Brazil
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Illah Nourbakhsh
Professor, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Gabriel O’Donnell
Principal Research Programmer, CMU CREATE Lab, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Oh Se-Jung
President, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

François Ortalo-Magné
Dean, London Business School, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Katharina Pistor
Edwin B. Parker Professor of Comparative Law, Columbia Law School, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Qiu Yong
President, Tsinghua University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Subramanian Rangan
The Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Court Endowed Chair in Societal Progress, INSEAD, France
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Rao Yi
President, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Carlo Ratti
Director, SENSEable City Laboratory, MIT – Department of Urban Studies and Planning, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Kristin Rechberger
Chief Executive Officer, Dynamic Planet, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

L. Rafael Reif
President, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Carmen M. Reinhart
Minos A. Zombanakis Professor of the International Financial System, Harvard Kennedy School of Government, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Shai Reshef
President, University of the People, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Johan Rockström
Director, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Germany
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Kenneth Rogoff
Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Economics, Harvard University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Enric Sala
Explorer-in-Residence, National Geographic Society, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Lisa Sanders
Associate Professor, Yale University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Samir Saran
President, Observer Research Foundation (ORF), India
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Brian Schmidt
Vice-Chancellor, Australian National University, Australia
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Sophie Scott
Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London (UCL), United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Minouche Shafik
Director, London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Beth Shapiro
Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Robert J. Shiller
Sterling Professor of Economics, Yale University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Shin Sung-Chul
President, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Republic of Korea
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Wei Shyy
President, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Landry Signé
Senior Fellow, Global Economy and Development Programme and Africa Growth Initiative, Brookings Institution, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ilina Singh
Professor of Neuroscience and Society, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Jagjit Singh Srai
Head, Centre for International Manufacturing, Institute for Manufacturing, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

A. Michael Spence
William R. Berkley Professor in Economics and Business, NYU Stern School of Business, Italy
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Amie Stepanovich
Executive Director, Silicon Flatirons, University of Colorado, Boulder, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Lord Nicholas Stern
Chair, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Molly Stevens
Professor, Imperial College London, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Joseph E. Stiglitz
Professor, School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), Columbia University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Subra Suresh
President, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Heizo Takenaka
Professor Emeritus, Keio University, Japan
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Tan Eng Chye
President, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Emma Teeling
Professor, School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Ireland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Stephen Toope
Vice-Chancellor, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Adam Tooze
Director, European Institute, Columbia University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Peter Tufano
Dean, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Lord J. Adair Turner
Chairman, Energy Transitions Commission, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Laura D’Andrea Tyson
Distinguished Professor of the Graduate School, Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Mark Vernooij
Partner, THNK School of Creative Leadership, Netherlands
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Gianmario Verona
Rector, Bocconi University, Italy
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Martin Vetterli
President, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Amy Webb
Professor, NYU Stern School of Business, Italy
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Beatrice Weder di Mauro
President, Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR), United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

E. Glen Weyl
Founder, RadicalXChange Foundation, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Gail Whiteman
Director, Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business, Lancaster University Management School (LUMS), United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Melati Wijsen
Founder, Bye Bye Plastic Bags, Indonesia
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ngaire Woods
Dean, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Anne Wright
Project Scientist, EarthTime Project, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Wu Zhaohui
President, Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Xue Lan
Professor; Dean, Schwarzman College, Tsinghua University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Amos Yadlin
Executive Director, Institute for National Security Studies, Israel
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Shinya Yamanaka
Director and Professor, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Japan
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Lin Yang
President, Innovation Ideas Institute, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Peter Zemsky
Deputy Dean; Dean of Innovation, INSEAD, France
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Zhu Ning
Associate Dean, National Institute of Financial Research (NIFR), Shanghai Advanced Institute of Finance (SAIF), Tsinghua University, People’s Republic of China
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Robert Zimmer
President, University of Chicago, USA
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Monika Zurek
Senior Researcher, Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, United Kingdom
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Ewine van Dishoeck
Professor of Molecular Astrophysics, Leiden University, Netherlands
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Vural Özdemir
Senior Editor and Writer, Emerging Technology Governance and Responsible Innovation, Canada
Level 1Academia/Think-tank

Joe Abi Akl
Chief Corporate Development Officer, Majid Al Futtaim, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Rob Acker
Chief Executive Officer, Salesforce.org, Salesforce, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Mauricio Adade
President, Latin America and Global Malnutrition Partnerships, Royal DSM, Brazil
Level 2Senior Executive

Sagar Adani
Executive Director, Adani Green Energy, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Priti Adani
Chairperson, Adani Foundation, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Anil Aggarwal
Co-Founder, Indus Group, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Neeraj Agrawal
Group Chief Financial Officer, Crescent Petroleum, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Banmali Agrawala
President, Infrastructure, Defence and Aerospace, Tata Sons, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Carolyn Ainslie
Chief Financial Officer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Laxmi Akkaraju
Chief Strategy Officer, GSMA, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Waleed Al Mokarrab Al Muhairi
Deputy Group Chief Executive Officer; Chief Executive Officer, Alternative Investments and Infrastructure, Mubadala, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Ziad Al Murshed
Vice-President, International Operations and Downstream Growth and Integration, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia
Level 2Senior Executive

Areije Al Shakar
Director and Fund Manager, Al Waha Venture Capital Fund, Bahrain
Level 2Senior Executive

Yousef Al Ulyan
Vice-President, Information Technology, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia
Level 2Senior Executive

Bader Al-Asaker
Chairman, Misk Initiatives Center, MiSK, Saudi Arabia
Level 2Senior Executive

Ahmed Ali Al-Hammadi
Head, Active Investments, Qatar Investment Authority, Qatar
Level 2Senior Executive

Alanoud Bint Hamad Al-Thani
Managing Director, Qatar Financial Centre (QFC), Qatar
Level 2Senior Executive

Peggy Alford
Senior Vice-President, Core Markets, PayPal, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Asharf Ali
Executive Director, Lulu Group International, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Khalid Alkhudair
Executive Vice-President, Riyad Bank, Saudi Arabia
Level 2Senior Executive

Donald Allan Jr.
Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer, Stanley Black & Decker, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Ken Allen
Chief Executive Officer, DHL eCommerce Solutions, Deutsche Post DHL, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Paulo Almirante
Executive Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, ENGIE Group, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Richard Ambrose
Executive Vice-President, Space Systems, Lockheed Martin Space Systems, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Christine Anderson
Senior Managing Director, Global Public Affairs, Blackstone Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Konstantinos Apostolatos
Lead Partner, Strategy, Top-Line Transformation and Boardroom Services, Kearney, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Lindsey Argalas
Chief Digital and Innovation Officer, Banco Santander, Spain
Level 2Senior Executive

Kazutomo Aritake
Senior Managing Executive Officer, Suntory Holdings, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Richard Arnold
Group Managing Director, Manchester United, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Ivan Arriagada Herrera
Chief Executive Officer, Antofagasta Minerals, Chile
Level 2Senior Executive

Dennis Arriola
Executive Vice-President, Group President and Chief Sustainability Officer, Sempra Energy, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Steven Ashley
Senior Managing Director; Head, Wholesale Division, Nomura Holdings, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Jakob Askou Boss
Senior Vice-President, Corporate Strategy and Stakeholder Relations, Ørsted, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Samir Assaf
Group Managing Director and Chief Executive, Global Banking and Markets, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Sami Atiya
President, Robotics and Discrete Automation; Member of the Group Executive Committee, ABB, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Jonathan Auerbach
Executive Vice-President; Chief Strategy, Growth and Data Officer, PayPal, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Stefano Aversa
Global Vice-Chairman and Chairman, Europe, Middle East and Africa, AlixPartners, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Eric Axford
Executive Vice-President; Chief Sustainability Officer, Suncor Energy, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Domenico Azzarello
Regional Managing Partner, Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), Bain & Company, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Oleg Bagrin
Member of the Board; Chairman, Strategy Committee, Novolipetsk Steel (NLMK), Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Tim Bailey
President, Global Consumer Brands, S. C. Johnson, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Baldwin
Global Managing Partner, Client Service, EY, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Chandrajit Banerjee
Director-General, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), India
Level 2Senior Executive

Pablo Alberto Barrera Lopez
Executive Vice-President, Strategy and Supply Chain, Yara International, Norway
Level 2Senior Executive

Muhamad Chatib Basri
Commissioner, Bank Mandiri (Persero), Indonesia
Level 2Senior Executive

Christophe Beck
President and Chief Operating Officer, Ecolab, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kai Beckmann
Chief Executive Officer, Performance Materials; Member of the Executive Board, Merck, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrey Belevtsev
Chief Digital Officer, Gazprom Neft, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

László Bencsik
Chief Financial and Strategic Officer, OTP Bank, Hungary
Level 2Senior Executive

Holly Benson
President and Chief Executive Officer, Health Care Enterprises, Centene, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Ralph Berg
Executive Vice-President; Global Head, Infrastructure, OMERS, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Andreas Berger
Chief Executive Officer, Corporate Solutions; Member of the Group Executive Committee, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Kevin Berryman
President and Chief Financial Officer, Jacobs, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Peter Beshar
Executive Vice-President and General Counsel, Marsh & McLennan Companies (MMC), USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Rajat Bhargava
Head, Emerging Mobility, Strategy and Global Business, Hero Motocorp, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Sudipta Bhattacharya
Chief Executive Officer, North America; Group Chief Technology Officer, Adani Group, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Waleed Bin Salman
Executive Vice-President, Business Development and Excellence, Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Anand Birje
Corporate Vice-President; Global Head, Digital and Analytics, HCL Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Barry Blattman
Vice-Chair, Brookfield Asset Management, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Richard Bloxam
Chief Executive Officer, Capital Markets, JLL, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Bertrand Bodson
Chief Digital Officer, Novartis International, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Hans Bohnen
Chief Operating Officer, Member of the Executive Committee, Clariant, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Jeffrey W. Bolton
Chief Administrative Officer and Vice-President, Mayo Clinic, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Django Bonderman
Partner, Mountain Philanthropies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

René Bonvanie
Executive Vice-President, Strategic Accounts, Palo Alto Networks, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexandra Brand
Chief Sustainability Officer, Syngenta, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Rachel Brand
Executive Vice-President, Global Governance; Chief Legal Officer; Corporate Secretary, Walmart, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Harry Brekelmans
Director, Projects and Technology, Royal Dutch Shell, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Stuart Brooks
Special Adviser, Chevron, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexis Brouhns
Senior Executive Vice-President; Head, Corporate Government Affairs and Country Management, Solvay, Belgium
Level 2Senior Executive

Oscar Brown
Senior Vice-President, Strategy, Business Development and Integrated Supply, Occidental, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Rich Buckley
Vice-President, Global Corporate Affairs, AstraZeneca, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrey Bugrov
Vice-President, Interros, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Juan Martín Bulgheroni
Vice-President, Pan American Energy, Argentina
Level 2Senior Executive

Bas Burger
Chief Executive Officer, Global Services, BT Group, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Brandy Burkhalter
Executive Vice-President, Operations, Centene, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Mark Burns
President, Gulfstream Aerospace, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Roland Busch
Member of the Managing Board, Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Chief Technology Officer and Chief Human Resources Officer, Siemens, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Pierre Cailleteau
Managing Director, Lazard, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Gilberto Caldart
President, International, Mastercard, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Eric Cantor
Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, Moelis & Company, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Teresa Carlson
Vice-President, Worldwide Public Sector, Amazon Web Services, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alain Carrier
Senior Managing Director; Head, International and Europe, Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB), United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Karen Carter
Chief Inclusion Officer and Chief Human Resources Officer, Dow Chemical, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Arne Cartridge
Special Adviser, Strategy and Business Development, Yara International, Norway
Level 2Senior Executive

Luis Castilla
Chief Executive Officer, Infrastructure, Acciona, Spain
Level 2Senior Executive

Christophe Catoir
Regional Head, France and Northern Europe, Adecco Group, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Nando Cesarone
President, International, UPS, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Nelson Chai
Chief Financial Officer, Uber Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Chansak Fuangfu
Executive Director and Senior Executive Vice-President, Bangkok Bank Public Company, Thailand
Level 2Senior Executive

Chen Ximin
Senior Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, Neusoft, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Chi Young Cho
President and Chief Innovation Officer, Hyundai Motor, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Nanjoo Choi
Vice-President and Chief Strategy Officer, Hanwha Hotels and Resorts, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Leda Chong
Senior Vice-President, Government, Gulfstream Aerospace, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Bernadette “Maya” Chorengel
Co-Managing Partner, The Rise Fund, TPG, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Per Christensen
Chairman of the Board of Directors, PensionDanmark, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Yulia Chupina
Senior Vice-President, Sberbank, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Ernesto Ciorra
Chief Innovability Officer, Enel, Italy
Level 2Senior Executive

Megan Clarken
Chief Commercial Officer, Nielsen Global Media, Nielsen, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Marcelo Claure
Chief Executive Officer, SoftBank Group International, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Annette Clayton
Chief Executive Officer and President, North America Operations, Schneider Electric, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Nick Clegg
Vice-President, Global Affairs and Communications, Facebook, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Cohen
Executive Chairman, J.P. Morgan Global Wealth Management, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Connie Collingsworth
Chief Operating Officer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Paul Compton
President, Barclays, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Al Cook
Executive Vice-President, Global Strategy and Business Development, Equinor, Norway
Level 2Senior Executive

Constantin Cotzias
Global Head, Government Affairs; Chair, London Office, Bloomberg, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alain Couttolenc
Chief Development Officer, Ipsos, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Tori Cowley
Group Chief Communications Officer, Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing (HKEX), Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 2Senior Executive

Carol Cruickshank
Partner, Americas Leadership, Kearney, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Brian Dames
Chief Executive Officer, African Rainbow Energy and Power, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Edward Dandridge
Global Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, General Insurance, AIG, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Claire Darley
Vice-President, Digital Media, Adobe, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

David Darmon
Group Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Wendel, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Gordon Davies
Executive Vice-President; Chief Legal Officer; Head, Corporate Development, OpenText, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Shahzada Dawood
Vice-Chairman of the Board, Dawood Hercules, Pakistan
Level 2Senior Executive

Laurence Debroux
Member of the Executive Board and Chief Financial Officer, HEINEKEN, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Clotilde Delbos
Chief Executive Officer ad interim, Renault; Chief Financial Officer, Groupe Renault, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Agustin Delgado
Chief Innovation and Sustainability Officer, Iberdrola, Spain
Level 2Senior Executive

Sylvain Dhenin
Managing Partner; Chief Executive Officer and Board Practice, Continental Europe and Africa, Heidrick & Struggles, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Begum Dogan Faralyali
Chairwoman, Dogan Holding, Turkey
Level 2Senior Executive

Leslie Donato
Executive Vice-President and Chief Strategy Officer, AmeriSourceBergen, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Thomas Donilon
Senior Adviser, BlackRock, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Robert Dorrance
Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President, TD Securities, TD Bank Group, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Saurine Mahendra Doshi
Partner and Head, Asia-Pacific, A.T. Kearney, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Lynne Doughtie
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; Member, Global Executive Committee, KPMG, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kerry Dryburgh
Global Head, Human Resources, BP, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Rachel Duan
President and Chief Executive Officer, China; Senior Vice-President, GE, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Florence Dubois
Chief Brand and Communications Officer, Jumeirah Group, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Morten Dyrholm
Group Senior Vice-President, Public Affairs, Vestas, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Makiko Eda
Chief Representative Officer, Japan; Member of the Executive Committee, Tokyo Office, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Stuart E. Eizenstat
Partner and Head, International Trade and Finance, Covington & Burling, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Erik Ekudden
Chief Technology Officer, Ericsson, Sweden
Level 2Senior Executive

Shireen El Khatib
Chief Executive Officer, Shopping Malls, Majid Al Futtaim, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Howard Elias
President, Services and Digital, Dell Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Gerri Elliott
Executive Vice-President and Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, Cisco, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Steve Ellis
Co-Managing Partner, Rise Fund, TPG, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kevin Ellis
Chairman and Senior Partner, PwC, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Marc Engel
Chief Supply Chain Officer, Unilever, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Robert Etman
Group Chief Financial Officer, Alghanim Industries, Kuwait
Level 2Senior Executive

J. Michael Evans
President, Alibaba Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Deirdre Evens
Executive Vice-President; General Manager, Records and Information Management, North America, Iron Mountain Information Management, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Claudio Facchin
President, Power Grids; Member of the Executive Committee, ABB, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Karen Fang
Managing Director; Head, Global Fixed Income, Currencies and Commodities (FICC), Cross-Asset Trading and Optimization, Bank of America, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Lucy Fato
Executive Vice-President and General Counsel, AIG, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Bridget Fawcett
Global Head, Strategy, Banking, Capital Markets and Advisory, Citi, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Douglas Feagin
President, International Business, Ant Financial, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Chano Fernandez
Co-President, Workday, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Susanne Fiedler
President, Europe and Canada, MSD, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Mary Finch
Executive Vice-President; Chief Human Resources Officer, DXC Technology, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Thomas Finke
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Barings, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Dawn Fitzpatrick
Chief Investment Officer, Soros Fund Management, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alan Fleischmann
Senior Adviser and Chief Executive Officer, Laurel Strategies, Vista Equity Partners, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

James Fok
Head, Group Strategy, Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing (HKEX), Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 2Senior Executive

Mark Foster
Senior Vice-President, Global Business Services, IBM, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Martin Fraenkel
President, S&P Global Platts, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Frank
President and Chief Executive Officer, Nutrien Ag Solutions; Executive Vice-President, Nutrien, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Malcolm Frank
President, Digital Business, Cognizant, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Laurent Freixe
Executive Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer, Americas, Nestlé, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Barry French
Chief Marketing Officer, Nokia, Finland
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Freno
Head, Global Markets, Barings, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Froman
Vice-Chairman and President, Strategic Growth, Mastercard, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Tomomi Fukumoto
Executive Officer; Chief Operating Officer, Corporate Sustainability Division, Suntory Holdings, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Hidenori Furuta
Senior Executive Vice-President, Chief Technology Officer, Chief Information Officer, Representative Director and Corporate Executive Officer, Fujitsu, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Chantal Gaemperle
Group Executive Vice-President, Human Resources and Synergies, LVMH Moët Hennessy – Louis Vuitton, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Charles Gai Longjia
Senior Vice-President and Chief Marketing Officer, Neusoft, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Natarajan Ganapathy Subramaniam
Chief Operating Officer, Tata Consultancy Services, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Belén Garijo
Chief Executive Officer, Healthcare; Member of the Executive Board, Merck, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Patrick Gaspard
President, Open Society Institute, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Troy Gayeski
Partner and Senior Portfolio Manager, SkyBridge Capital, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Julie Gebauer
Head, Global Business Segment, Human Capital and Benefits, Willis Towers Watson, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Courtney Geduldig
Executive Vice-President, Public Affairs, S&P Global, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Gelchie
Chief Operating Officer, Louis Dreyfus Company, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Julie Louise Gerberding
Executive Vice-President and Chief Patient Officer, Strategic Communications, Global Public Policy and Population Health, MSD, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Henk Jan Gerzee
Chief Digital and Innovation Officer, Royal Schiphol Group, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Anthony Gianotti
Chief Financial Officer, Wesfarmers, Australia
Level 2Senior Executive

Roberto Giay
Group General Manager, Unipol Gruppo, Italy
Level 2Senior Executive

Hashim Gillani
President, People and Strategy, Alghanim Industries, Kuwait
Level 2Senior Executive

Sadiq Gillani
Senior Vice-President, Emirates Group, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Brian Gilvary
Group Chief Financial Officer, BP, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

John Giusti
Chief Regulatory Officer, GSMA, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Khaya Gobodo
Managing Director: Wealth and Investments, Old Mutual, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Pirojsha Godrej
Executive Chairman, Godrej Properties, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Nancy Goldberg
Executive Vice-President, Chief Marketing and Sales Officer, Kudelski Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Ashley Goldsmith
Chief People Officer, Workday, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

John Goodwin
Chief Executive Officer, LEGO Foundation, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty
Vice-President, International Rides, Uber Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Stephen P. Gottesfeld
Executive Vice-President, Chief Sustainable and External Affairs Officer, Newmont, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Tamur Goudarzi-Pour
Chief Commercial Officer, Swiss International Air Lines, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Ramadevi Gourineni
Managing Director, Amara Raja Infra and Amara Raja Industrial Services; Co-Founder, Amara Raja Group, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Sucheta Govil
Chief Commercial Officer, Covestro, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Guru Gowrappan
Chief Executive Officer, Verizon Media, Verizon Communications, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Ashish Goyal
Senior Portfolio Manager, Pharo Management, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Sari Granat
Executive Vice-President, Chief Administrative Officer and General Counsel, IHS Markit, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Gray
Managing Director, Group Chief Risk Officer, Depository Trust & Clearing (DTCC), USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Nelson Griggs
President, Nasdaq Stock Exchange, Nasdaq, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Vittorio Grilli
Chairman, Italy; Chairman, Corporate and Investment Bank, Europe, Middle East and Africa, J.P Morgan, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Stefan Gross-Selbeck
Global Managing Partner, BCG Digital Ventures, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Keith Grossman
President, TIME, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Béatrice Guillaume-Grabisch
Head, Group Human Resources and Business Services, Nestlé, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Gregory Guyett
Head, Global Banking, HSBC, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Carl-Johan Hagman
Chief Executive Officer, Stena, Sweden
Level 2Senior Executive

Martha Hall Findlay
Chief Sustainability Officer, Suncor Energy, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Mohamad Ali Hamade
Chief Investment Officer, VPS Healthcare, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Shaima Hamidaddin
Executive Manager, MiSK, Saudi Arabia
Level 2Senior Executive

Jan Hammer
Partner, Index Ventures, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Akira Harashima
Senior Managing Director; Co-Head, International Business, Tokio Marine, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Suni Harford
Member of the Group Executive Board; President, Asset Management, UBS, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Matthew J. Harrington
Global President, Edelman, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Shigeto Hashiyama
Managing Executive Officer; Global Head, Corporate Planning Group, Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC), Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Marcela Hawn
Senior Vice-President and Chief Communications Officer, Centene, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Tatsuya Hayashi
Partner, Unison Capital, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Tony Hayward
Chairman, Glencore International, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Patrick Healy
Chief Executive Officer, Hellman & Friedman, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Chris Hearne
Chief Financial Officer, Dana Gas, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Carl Hess
Chief Executive Officer, Investment, Risk and Reinsurance, Willis Towers Watson, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jenni Hibbert
Global Practice Managing Partner, Financial Services, Heidrick & Struggles, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Philipp M. Hildebrand
Vice-Chairman, BlackRock, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Liz Hilton Segel
Managing Partner, North America, McKinsey & Company, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Philip Hoare
President, WS Atkins, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Cary Hobbs
Executive Vice-President and Chief of Staff, Centene, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Mark Hoffman
Chairman, CNBC, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Charlotte Hogg
Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Visa, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Richard Hookway
Chief Executive, Centrica Business, Centrica, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Kentaro Hosomi
Executive Vice-President; President and Chief Executive Officer, Power Systems, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Howard
Senior Vice-President; Chief Executive Officer, Kudelski Security – Kudelski Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

W. Lee Howell
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Jack Howell
Chief Executive Officer, Asia-Pacific, Zurich Insurance Group, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 2Senior Executive

Judy Hsu
Regional Chief Executive Officer, ASEAN and South Asia, Standard Chartered Bank, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Sjoerd Hubben
Vice-President, Global Government Affairs and Policy, AstraZeneca, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Gwenaelle Huet
Chief Executive Officer, ENGIE North America; Executive Vice-President, ENGIE Group, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Dame Vivian Hunt
Managing Partner, United Kingdom and Ireland, McKinsey & Company, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Rory Hunter
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, Song Saa Collective, Cambodia
Level 2Senior Executive

Paul Hunyor
Partner; Managing Director; Head, Digital Ventures, Asia, BCG Digital Ventures, Australia
Level 2Senior Executive

Mikhail Iakobachvili
Vice-President, Orion Heritage, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

David Iakobachvili
President, Orion Heritage, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Alijan Ibragimov
Member of the Board of Directors, Eurasian Resources Group (ERG), Luxembourg
Level 2Senior Executive

Seiji Imai
Senior Managing Executive Officer, Mizuho Financial Group, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Katie Ioanilli
Senior Vice-President, Global Corporate Communications, Ralph Lauren, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Ainojie “Alex” Irune
Chief Operating Officer, Oando, Nigeria
Level 2Senior Executive

Shigeru Ishida
Executive Officer, Dentsu, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Norihiko Ishiguro
Senior Executive Vice-President; Member of the Board, NEC, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Philippe Isler
Director, Global Alliance for Trade Facilitation; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Ahmed Ismail
Chief Executive Officer, Majid Al Futtaim Properties, Majid Al Futtaim, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Yutaka Ito
Executive Vice-President, All Nippon Airways (ANA), Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Eisaku Ito
Senior Vice-President; Co-Chief Technology Officer and Head, Technology Strategy Office, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Bahia Ezzat Jaafar
Deputy Chairman and Deputy Chief Executive Officer, Kuwaiti Danish Dairy (KDD), Kuwait
Level 2Senior Executive

Lisa P. Jackson
Vice-President, Apple, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Selina Jackson
Senior Vice-President, Global Government Relations and Public Policy, Procter & Gamble, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jeffrey Pichet Jaensubhakij
Group Chief Investment Officer, GIC, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Anurag Jain
Managing Partner, Perot Jain, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Fady Jameel
Deputy President and Vice-Chairman, Abdul Latif Jameel, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Rodger Jardine
Chairman, FirstRand, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Pedro Jatobá
Chief Generation Officer, Eletrobras, Brazil
Level 2Senior Executive

Huw Jenkins
Vice-Chairman and Member of the Board of Directors, Banco BTG Pactual, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Eric Jing
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Ant Financial Services Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Peggy Johnson
Executive Vice-President, Business Development, Microsoft, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Chris Johnson
Executive Vice-President; Chief Executive Officer, Asia, Oceania and sub-Saharan Africa, Nestlé, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Mcebisi Jonas
Chairperson, MTN Group, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Paul Tudor Jones II
Chairman, JUST Capital, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Lars Fruergaard Jorgensen
President and Chief Executive Officer, Novo Nordisk, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Jan Kadanik
Chief Financial Officer; Head, Strategy, PPF, Czech Republic
Level 2Senior Executive

Rashad-Rudolf Kaldany
Partner; Chief Investment Officer, BlueOrange Capital, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Tony Kalm
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder, the LINK Fund, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Melanie Kalmar
Corporate Vice-President, Chief Information Officer and Chief Digital Officer, Dow, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Amit Kalyani
Deputy Managing Director, Bharat Forge, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Hironori Kamezawa
Member of the Board of Directors; Deputy President, MUFG (Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group), Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Robert Kapito
President, BlackRock, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Aaron Karczmer
Chief Risk Officer; Executive Vice-President, Risk, Regulatory and Protection Services, PayPal, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Neema Kaseje
Surgeon, Médecins Sans Frontières, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Anurag Kashyap
Vice-President, Corporate Affairs, NMC Healthcare, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Francine Katsoudas
Executive Vice-President and Chief People Officer, Cisco, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Brian Kaufmann
Portfolio Manager; Head, Private Investments, Viking Global Investors, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Sunil Kaushal
Regional Chief Executive, Africa and Middle East, Standard Chartered Bank, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Kevin Kawasaki
Executive Vice-President, Business Development, Palantir Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Adnan Kazim
Chief Commercial Officer, Emirates Airline, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Sabine Keller-Busse
Group Chief Operating Officer; President, Europe, Middle East and Africa, UBS, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Suzan Kereere
Global Head, Merchant Sales and Acquiring, Visa, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Armen Khachatrian
Deputy Director, Roscongress Foundation, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Dong-Kwan Kim
Chief Commercial Officer and Executive Vice-President, Hanwha QCELLS & Advanced Materials, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Dong-Won Kim
Chief Digital Strategy Officer; Senior Vice-President, Hanwha Life, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Julie Kim
President, Plasma-Derived Therapies Business Unit, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Yong Hyun Kim
Chief Executive Officer, Hanwha Asset Management, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Kim Jun
Chief Executive Officer, SK Innovation, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Steve King
Global Chief Operating Officer, Publicis Groupe, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Annette King
Chief Executive Officer, United Kingdom, Publicis Groupe, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Ros King
Executive Vice-President, Global Client, Publicis Groupe, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Krishna Kishore Maheshwari
Vice-Chairman, UltraTech Cement Ltd, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Julie Kitcher
Executive Vice-President, Communications and Corporate Affairs, Airbus, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Shannon Klinger
Group General Counsel, Novartis International, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Christoph Koenen
Executive Vice-President, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Rajan Kohli
President, Wipro Digital, Wipro, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Steve Koltes
Co-Founder and Co-Chairman, CVC Capital Partners, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Sergey Komyshan
Executive Director and Member of the Management Board, Basic Polymers, Capital Projects, Sales and Marketing, Sibur, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Meredith Kopit Levien
Executive Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, New York Times, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexey Kozlov
Managing Director and Member of the Management Board, Sibur, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Kelly Kramer
Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer, Cisco, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Melanie Kreis
Chief Financial Officer, Deutsche Post DHL, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Ramya Krishnaswamy
Head of Institutional Communities; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Carla Kriwet
Chief Executive Officer, Connected Care, Royal Philips, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Juan Luis Kruger Sayán
Chief Executive Officer, Minsur, Peru
Level 2Senior Executive

Tomasz Kubiak
Vice-President of the Management Board, Bank Pekao, Poland
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexander Kudlich
Member of the Executive Board, Rocket Internet, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

B Kalyan Kumar
Corporate Vice-President and Chief Technology Officer, HCL Technologies, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Seema Kumar
Vice-President, Innovation, Global Health and Science Policy Communication, Johnson & Johnson, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Ravi Kumar S.
President, Infosys, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Thomas Kurian
Chief Executive Officer, Google Cloud, Google, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kasim Kutay
Chief Executive Officer, Novo Holdings, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Peter Lacy
Senior Managing Director, Accenture, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Jean-Christophe Laloux
Director-General, Lending Operations, European Investment Bank, Luxembourg
Level 2Senior Executive

Gordana Landen
Chief Human Resources Officer, Adecco Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Justin Koo-yung Lee
Chief Executive Officer, Hanwha Chemical, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Lee Yong-Gyoo
Senior Vice-President, KT (Korea Telecom), Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

John Markus Lervik
Chief Executive Officer, Cognite, Norway
Level 2Senior Executive

Bernd Leukert
Member of the Management Board, Chief Technology, Data and Innovation Officer, Deutsche Bank, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Matthew Levin
Chief Strategy Officer, Automatic Data Processing (ADP), USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Li Pengcheng
Vice-President, Mengniu Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Susy Liang
Head, Global External Relation Policy-Making, Hitachi, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Liao Jianwen
Chief Strategy Officer, JD.COM, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Lightfoot
Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, LeasePlan, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Robert Lightfoot
Vice-President, Strategy and Business Development, Lockheed Martin, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Stephanie Linnartz
Group President, Consumer Operations, Technology and Emerging Businesses, Marriott International, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Liu Bicheng
Senior Vice-President, Deppon Logistics, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Liu Qian
Managing Director, Greater China, Economist Group, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Liu Xiao
Partner, Beijing Vanke, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Lo
Chief Executive, Asia-Pacific Operations, Invesco Asia, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 2Senior Executive

Peter Lochbihler
Global Director, Public Affairs, Booking.com, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

David Loew
Executive Vice-President; Head, Sanofi Pasteur, Sanofi, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Amit Lohia
Director, Indorama Ventures, Thailand
Level 2Senior Executive

Rachel Lord
Senior Managing Director; Head, Europe, Middle East and Africa, BlackRock, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Margarita Louis-Dreyfus
Chairperson of the Supervisory Board, Louis Dreyfus Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Christian Lucas
Co-Head, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Silver Lake, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Dave Luken
Chief Executive Officer, Skidata – Kudelski Group, Austria
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrónico Luksic
Vice-President, Corporate Development, Antofagasta Minerals, Chile
Level 2Senior Executive

Davor Luksic
Chairman, Excelsa, Croatia
Level 2Senior Executive

Kathleen Lynch
Vice-President, Global Government Affairs and Public Policy, Illumina, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Karen Lynch
Executive Vice-President, CVS Health; President, Aetna, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Elie Maalouf
Chief Executive Officer, Americas, InterContinental Hotels Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kevan Mabbutt
Senior Vice-President and Chief Consumer Officer, Intermountain Healthcare, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Osvaldo Macaia
Member of the Board of Directors, Sonangol, Angola
Level 2Senior Executive

Manny Maceda
Worldwide Managing Partner, Bain & Company, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jongisa Magagula
Director, Investor Relations and Corporate Development, African Rainbow Minerals, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Phuthi Mahanyele-Dabengwa
Chief Executive Officer, South Africa, Naspers, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Mohammed Mahomedy
Acting Chief Executive Officer, Transnet, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Trish Malarkey
Chief Innovation Officer, Royal DSM, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Paul Manduca
Chairman, Prudential, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Prasanth Manghat
Chief Executive Officer, NMC Healthcare, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Thulisile Manzini
Chief Executive Officer, Brand South Africa, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Demetrios Marantis
Senior Vice-President; Global Head, Government Engagement, Visa, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

David Marcus
Head, Calibra, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jacko Maree
Chairman, Liberty Holdings, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Ricardo Marek
President, Emerging Markets, Takeda Pharmaceuticals (Asia Pacific), Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Dr. John Markels
President, Global Vaccines, MSD, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alison Martin
Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Middle East and Africa, and Bank Distribution, Zurich Insurance Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Geraldine Matchett
Chief Financial Officer, Royal DSM, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Rafael Mateo
Chief Executive Officer, Energy, Acciona, Spain
Level 2Senior Executive

Richard Mattison
Chief Executive Officer, Trucost, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Skyler Mattson
President, Wongdoody, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Eugene Mayne
Group Chief Executive, Tristar Transport, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Heather McDevitt
Partner and Member of the Executive Committee, White & Case, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kelly McGinnis
Senior Vice-President and Chief Communications Officer, Levi Strauss & Co., USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Judith McKenna
President and Chief Executive Officer, International, Walmart, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Matthew McKnight
Chief Commercial Officer, Ginkgo Bioworks, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Karen McLoughlin
Chief Financial Officer, Cognizant, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Stephen Meahl
Chief Operating Officer, Strategy and Communications Advisory, Teneo, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Stella Medlicott
Senior Vice-President; Chief Marketing and Communications Officer; Head, Group Marketing and Corporate Relations Function, Ericsson, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Maria Medvedeva
Deputy Chief Executive Officer, External Communications, Russian Direct Investment Fund, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Larry Meixner
Managing Corporate Executive Officer, Chief Innovation Officer, Chief Technology Officer, Mitsubishi Chemical Holdings, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Anil Menon
Managing Director; Head, Centre for Global Industries, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Tony Milikin
Chief Procurement and Sustainability Officer, Anheuser-Busch InBev, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jerry Miller
President, Guggenheim Investments, Guggenheim Partners, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Mikhael Mirilashvili
President, Watergen, Israel
Level 2Senior Executive

Shankh Mitra
Executive Vice-President, Chief Investment Officer, Welltower, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Aditya Mittal
Chief Executive Officer, Europe; President and Chief Financial Officer, ArcelorMittal, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Rajan Bharti Mittal
Vice-Chairman, Bharti Enterprises, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Osamu Mogi
Director; Executive Corporate Officer; General Manager, International Operations, Kikkoman, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Alisha Moopen
Deputy Managing Director, Aster DM Healthcare, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Thomas M. Moriarty
Executive Vice-President; Chief Policy and External Affairs Officer; General Counsel, CVS Health, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Mohammed Mudarris
Head of EMEA Business, Canyon Partners, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Oleg Mukhamedshin
Deputy Chief Executive Officer; Director, Strategy, Business Development and Financial Markets, En+ Group, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Neil Murray
Chief Executive Officer, Corporate Solutions, JLL, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Mohamed Althaf Musliam
Director, Lulu Group International, Qatar
Level 2Senior Executive

Philip Myers
Senior Vice-President, Global Public Policy and Government Affairs, PepsiCo, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Penelope Naas
Senior Vice-President, International Public Affairs and Sustainability, UPS Europe, Belgium
Level 2Senior Executive

Kazumasa Nagayama
Vice-President; Chief Strategy Officer, Eisai, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Sandeep A. Naik
Managing Director, General Atlantic, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Leena Nair
Chief Human Resources Officer, Unilever, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Keisuke Naito
Vice-President, Chief Digital Officer, Dementia Total Inclusive Ecosystem, Eisai, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Thachat Viswanath Narendran
Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, Tata Steel, Tata Sons, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Elshad Nasirov
Vice-President, SOCAR (State Oil Company of the Azerbaijan Republic), Azerbaijan
Level 2Senior Executive

Salim Nathoo
Equity Partner; Head, Telecom, Apax Partners, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Amit Nayyar
President, Paytm, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Sanjay Nazerali
Chief Development and Strategy Officer, Dentsu Aegis Network, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Max Neukirchen
Global Head, Strategy, JP Morgan, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Sylvie Nicol
Executive Vice-President, Human Resources and Infrastructure Services, Henkel, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Bruce Niemeyer
Vice-President, Strategy and Sustainability, Chevron, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kanji Nishiura
Member of the Board, Executive Vice-President, Mitsubishi Corporation, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Burke Norton
Senior Managing Director, Co-Head, Perennial Investing, Vista Equity Partners, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Renee Noto
Partner and President, Brightstar Capital Partners, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Chris Nthite
Vice-President, Corporate Affairs, AngloGold Ashanti, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Gregory O’Brien
Chief Executive Officer, Americas, JLL, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Derek O’Halloran
Head of Shaping the Future of Digital Economy and New Value Creation, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Hutham Olayan
Chairman, Corporate Board, Olayan Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Riccardo Orcel
Deputy Chief Executive Officer, VTB Bank, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Masahiko Oshima
Deputy President, Sumitomo Mitsui Banking, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Jeroen Ouwehand
Global Senior Partner, Clifford Chance, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Chris Padilla
Vice-President, Government and Regulatory Affairs, IBM, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Anand Padmanabhan
President, Strategic Sales and Geographies, Wipro, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Papachristodoulou
Chief Financial Officer, Angelicoussis Group, Greece
Level 2Senior Executive

Oleg Pashaev
Senior Vice-President, Sales and Supplies, LUKOIL, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Sheila Patel
Chairman, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, Goldman Sachs International, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Patterson
Managing Partner, HPS Investment Partners, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Simon Patterson
Managing Director, Silver Lake, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Jaak Peeters
Head, Global Public Health, Johnson & Johnson, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jonathan Pegler
Head, Supply, Trading and New Ventures, Puma Energy, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Louise Pentland
Executive Vice-President, Chief Business Affairs and Legal Officer, PayPal, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Beatriz Perez
Senior Vice-President; Chief Communications, Public Affairs, Sustainability and Marketing Assets Officer, The Coca-Cola Company, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Francisco Perez Mackenna
Chief Executive Officer, Luksic Group, Chile
Level 2Senior Executive

Glaucimar Peticov
Group Managing Director, Banco Bradesco, Brazil
Level 2Senior Executive

Stephanie Plaines
Chief Financial Officer, JLL, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Todd Platt
Chief Executive Officer, Hillwood, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Hans Ploos van Amstel
Chief Financial Officer, Adecco Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Sanjay Poonen
Chief Operating Officer, VMware, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Vijay Poonoosamy
Director, International and Public Affairs, QI Group, Malaysia
Level 2Senior Executive

Anatoly Popov
Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Ruth Porat
Senior Vice-President, Chief Financial Officer, Google, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Julio Portalatin
Vice-Chair, Marsh & McLennan, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Dina Powell McCormick
Partner, Goldman Sachs, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Lina Prada
Director, Technology and Innovation, Saudi Basic Industries Corporation (SABIC), Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Scott Price
Chief Strategy and Transformation Officer, UPS, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jonathan Pruzan
Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer, Morgan Stanley, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Anne Pullum
Chief Executive Officer, Western Europe, Willis Towers Watson, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Punke
Vice-President, Global Public Policy, Amazon Web Services, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jérôme Pécresse
President and Chief Executive Officer, GE Renewable Energy, France
Level 2Senior Executive

George Quinn
Group Chief Financial Officer, Member of the Executive Committee, Zurich Insurance Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Karen H. Quintos
Executive Vice-President and Chief Customer Officer, Dell Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Rima Qureshi
Executive Vice-President and Chief Strategy Officer, Verizon Communications, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jean Raby
Chief Executive Officer, Natixis Investment Managers, Natixis, France
Level 2Senior Executive

David Rafalovsky
Executive Vice-President, Chief Technology Officer, Sberbank, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Iskra Reic
Executive Vice-President, Europe and Canada, AstraZeneca, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Ren Hongpeng
Vice-President, China Railway Group (CREC), People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Andreas Renschler
Member of the Board of Management, Volkswagen Group, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

John Riady
Group Executive Director, Lippo Group, Indonesia
Level 2Senior Executive

John Ridding
Chief Executive, Financial Times Group, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Jürgen Rigterink
First Vice-President, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), London
Level 2Senior Executive

Christiana Riley
Member of the Management Board, Deutsche Bank, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Robertson
President and Chief Executive Officer, BBDO Worldwide, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Paul Robson
President, International, Adobe, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

John F.W. Rogers
Executive Vice-President, Goldman, Sachs & Co., USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Olivia Ross-Wilson
Chief Communications Officer, Ikea Retail (Ingka Group), Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Zane Rowe
Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice-President, VMware, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Charles Russon
Chief Executive, Corporate and Investment Banking, Absa Group, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Peter Rutland
Managing Partner, CVC Capital Partners, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Tim Ryan
Chairman and Senior Partner, PwC, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Timothy Ryan
Chief Investment Officer and Chief Executive Officer, Asset and Wealth Management, Generali, Italy
Level 2Senior Executive

Sajid Saeed
Chief Strategy Officer, Al Dabbagh Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 2Senior Executive

Urvashi Sahni
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Study Hall Educational Foundation, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Kazuhiro Saito
President and Chief Executive Officer, Suntory Beverage & Food, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Shun Sakurai
Director; Executive Vice-President, Dentsu, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Axton Salim
Director and Member of the Board, Indofood, Indonesia
Level 2Senior Executive

Christophe Salmon
Group Chief Financial Officer, Trafigura Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Dipender Saluja
Managing Partner, Capricorn Investment Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Dmitry Samartsev
Chief Executive Officer, BI.ZONE, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Jeffrey Sanders
Vice-Chairman; Co-Managing Partner, Global Chief Executive Officer and Board Practice, Heidrick & Struggles, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Shyam Sankar
President, Palantir Technologies, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Tomoki Sano
Director; President and Regional Head, SG Holdings Global, SG Holdings, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Paula Santilli
Chief Executive Officer, PepsiCo Latin America, PepsiCo, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Santitarn Sathirathai
Group Chief Economist, Sea, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Véronique Sarlat-Depotte
Alliance Global Executive Vice-President; Chairman, Purchasing, Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi; Managing Director, Alliance Purchasing Organization, Groupe Renault, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Costa Saroukos
Chief Financial Officer, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Damien Sauer
Partner, Greentech Capital Advisors, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Stefano Scabbio
President, Southern and Eastern Europe, ManpowerGroup, Italy
Level 2Senior Executive

Susanne Schaffert
President, Oncology, Novartis Pharma, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Christoph Schell
Chief Commercial Officer, HP, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Andrew Schlossberg
Senior Managing Director and Head, Americas, Invesco, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Cornelia Schneider
Vice-President; Head, Global Experiential Marketing, Hyundai Motors, Republic of Korea
Level 2Senior Executive

Martin Schroeter
Senior Vice-President, Global Markets, IBM, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Muriel Schwab
Chief Financial Officer, Gunvor Group, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Takashi Sekiguchi
Managing Officer, Corporate Planning, Honda Motor, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Peter Selfridge
Global Head, Digital Government, SAP, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Marut Sen Gupta
Deputy Director-General, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), India
Level 2Senior Executive

Karim Shalak
Chief Investment Officer, Kcap Holdings, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Amit Sharma
Executive Vice-President and President, Asia, American Tower, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Robin Sheremeta
Senior Vice-President, Coal, Teck Resources, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Binay Shetty
Executive Director, Finablr, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Aleksandr Shevelev
General Director, Management, Severstal, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Shruti Shibulal
Chief Executive Officer and Director, Tamara Leisure Experiences, India
Level 2Senior Executive

Taro Shimada
Corporate Vice-President and Chief Digital Officer, Toshiba, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Yutaka Shimazaki
Executive Officer, Executive Secretariat and Corporate Communications Department, Marubeni Corporation, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Ellyn Shook
Chief Leadership and Human Resources Officer, Accenture, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Ann Shuman
General Counsel, Depository Trust & Clearing (DTCC), USA
Level 2Senior Executive

James Brian Sikes
Corporate Senior Vice-President, Cargill Protein and Salt; Chief Risk Officer, Cargill, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Daryl Simm
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Omnicom Media Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Antonio Simoes
Chief Executive Officer, Global Private Bank, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Hayat Sindi
Senior Adviser for Science, Technology and Innovation to the President, Islamic Development Bank, Jeddah
Level 2Senior Executive

Shamina Singh
President, Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth, Mastercard, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Harmit Singh
Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer, Levi Strauss & Co., USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Praveen Singhavi
President, Asia Pacific Resources International Holdings (APRIL), Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Tushar Singhvi
Director, CE-Ventures, Crescent Enterprises, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Rohit Sipahimalani
Chief Investment Strategist, Temasek, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Jiri Smejc
Chairman of the Board of Directors, HomeCredit Group, Czech Republic
Level 2Senior Executive

Marcia M. Smith
Senior Vice-President, Sustainability and External Affairs, Teck Resources, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Carsten Spohr
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Deutsche Lufthansa, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Nikos Stathopoulos
Partner and Member of the Executive Committee, BC Partners, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Katie Stein
Chief Strategy Officer, Genpact International, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Lars Stenqvist
Chief Technology Officer, Volvo Group, Sweden
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexander Stubb
Vice-President and Member of the Management Committee, European Investment Bank, Luxembourg
Level 2Senior Executive

Carol Stubbings
Global Leader, People and Organizations Practice, PwC, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Yoshihito Suda
Executive Officer, Chief Research Officer, Suntory Holdings, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

K.C. Sullivan
President and Managing Director, International, CNBC, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Ishmael Sunga
Chief Executive Officer, Southern African Confederation of Agricultural Unions (SACAU), South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Takeshi Suzuki
Group Managing Executive Officer, SPARX Group, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Christoph Swarovski
Member of the Executive Board, Tyrolit Schleifmittelwerke Swarovski, Austria
Level 2Senior Executive

Camilla Sylvest
Executive Vice-President, Commercial Strategy and Corporate Affairs, Novo Nordisk, Denmark
Level 2Senior Executive

Murat Sönmez
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Ilya Tafintsev
Deputy Chairman of the Management Board, Novatek, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Åsa Tamsons
Senior Vice-President; Head, Business Area Technologies and New Businesses, Ericsson, Sweden
Level 2Senior Executive

Vivian Tan
Vice-President, Strategy and Transformation, Kaiser Permanente, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jeroen Tas
Chief Innovation and Strategy Officer, Royal Philips, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Keiko Tashiro
Deputy President, Corporate Executive Officer and Member of the Board, Daiwa Securities Group, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Loic Tassel
President, Europe, Procter & Gamble Europe, Switzerland
Level 2Senior Executive

Carolyn Tastad
Group President, North America; Chief Sales Officer, Procter & Gamble, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Bret Taylor
President and Chief Operating Officer, Salesforce, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Julie Linn Teigland
Managing Partner, Europe, Middle East, India and Africa, EY, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Giulio Terzariol
Chief Financial Officer, Allianz, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Günther Thallinger
Member of the Board of Management, Investment Management, Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG), Allianz, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Sharon Thorne
Global Chair, Deloitte, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Dmitry Timoshenko
Vice-President, Business Development, Upstream, LUKOIL, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Michael Tipsord
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Toshiaki Tokunaga
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Hitachi Vantara, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Oliver Tonby
Chairman, Asia, McKinsey & Company, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Caroline Tsai
Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary, Western Union, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Junko Tsuboi
Senior Executive Officer; General Manager, Strategic Branding Department, Kirin Holdings, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Amy Tu
Executive Vice-President; General Counsel, Tyson Foods, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Allyson Tucker
Chief Investment Officer, Washington State Investment Board, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

John Tuttle
Vice-Chairman, NYSE, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Lorraine Twohill
Chief Marketing Officer, Google, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Benoit Valentin
Senior Managing Director, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Temasek, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Daniel Van Otterdijk
Senior Vice-President, Communications and Brand, DP World, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Geert Van Poelvoorde
Chief Executive Officer, Flat Products and Purchasing, Europe, ArcelorMittal, Belgium
Level 2Senior Executive

Ashok Vaswani
Chief Executive Officer, United Kingdom, Barclays, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Rajeev Venkayya
President, Global Vaccine Business, Takeda Pharmaceuticals International, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Harry Verhaar
Head, Global Public and Government Affairs, Signify, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Florence Verzelen
Executive Vice-President, Industry Solutions, Field Marketing, Global Affairs, Dassault Systèmes, France
Level 2Senior Executive

Rodger Voorhies
President, Global Growth and Opportunity, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Sebastian Vos
Partner; Chair, Global Public Policy Practice, Covington, Belgium
Level 2Senior Executive

Richard Wainwright
Chief Executive Officer, Investec, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Hiroyuki Wakabayashi
Executive Vice-President and Member of the Board, DENSO, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

John Waldron
President and Chief Operating Officer, Goldman Sachs, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Jimmy Wales
Founder, Wikipedia.org, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Kent Walker
Senior Vice-President, Global Affairs, Google, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexandra Wallace
Vice-President, News, Entertainment and Oath Studios, Oath, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Debra Walton
Executive Vice-President, Refinitiv, United Kingdom
Level 2Senior Executive

Leah Wang Ying
Vice-President, International Affairs, Trip.com Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Wang Zhenhui
Chief Executive Officer, JD Logistics, JD.COM, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Shamus Weiland
Global Chief Information Officer, Manulife, Canada
Level 2Senior Executive

Hani Weiss
Chief Executive Officer, Retail, Majid Al Futtaim, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Senior Executive

Laura Wilbanks
Chief Marketing Officer, Thomson Reuters, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Andries Jacobus Wilkens
Executive Director, Member of the Board of Directors, African Rainbow Minerals, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Ed Williams
President and Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Edelman, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Iain Williamson
Chief Executive Officer ad interim, Old Mutual, South Africa
Level 2Senior Executive

Wirat Uanarumit
Chief Executive Officer, Thai Oil, Thailand
Level 2Senior Executive

Susan Wojcicki
Chief Executive Officer, YouTube, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Christoph Wolff
Head of Shaping the Future of Mobility, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Brian A. Wong
Vice-President, Global Initiatives, Alibaba Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Wong Ai Ai
Member of the Global Executive Committee; Chair, Asia-Pacific, Baker McKenzie, Singapore
Level 2Senior Executive

Anshumann Woodhull
Partner and Managing Director, PAG, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 2Senior Executive

William Xu
Director of the Board; President, Institute of Strategic Research, Huawei Technologies, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Xu Lei
Chief Executive Officer, JD Retail, JD.com, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Sergey Yakovenko
Deputy General Director, Innovation, En+ Group, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Alexey Yakovitskiy
Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Management Board, VTB Capital, Russian Federation
Level 2Senior Executive

Toru Yamaguchi
President, Mitsubishi International; Senior Vice-President, Mitsubishi Corporation, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Hideki Yamano
Director; Managing Executive Officer, Sumitomo Corporation, Japan
Level 2Senior Executive

Daniel Yergin
Vice-Chairman, IHS Markit, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Dan Yerushalmi
Chief Customer Officer, Check Point Software Technologies, Israel
Level 2Senior Executive

Tae Yoo
Senior Vice-President, Corporate Affairs and Corporate Social Responsibility, Cisco, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Yun Zhanyou
Vice-President, Inner Mongolia Yili Industrial Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Peter Zaffino
Chief Executive Officer, AIG General Insurance; President and Global Chief Operating Officer, AIG, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Michelle Zatlyn
Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer, Cloudflare, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Claus Zemke
Senior Vice-President, Corporate Communication, LANXESS, Germany
Level 2Senior Executive

Zhao Ying
President, Global Business, Alibaba Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Zhou Bowen
President, JD Cloud and JD AI; Chair, JD Technology Committee; Vice-President, JD.com, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Senior Executive

Zhu Jun
President, TikTok, ByteDance, Cayman Islands
Level 2Senior Executive

Ellen Zimiles
Managing Director, Financial Services Advisory and Compliance Segment Leader, Navigant, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Adif Zulkifli
Executive Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer, Upstream, PETRONAS (Petroliam Nasional), Malaysia
Level 2Senior Executive

Alois Zwinggi
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 2Senior Executive

Henk Siebren de Jong
Chief, International Markets; Executive Vice-President; Member of the Executive Committee, Royal Philips, Netherlands
Level 2Senior Executive

Rob ten Hoedt
Executive Vice-President; President, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Medtronic, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Karen van Bergen
Dean, Omnicom University; Executive Vice-President, Omnicom Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Marcel Q. H. van Poecke
Managing Director, Carlyle International Energy Partners (CIEP), Carlyle Group, USA
Level 2Senior Executive

Enrique Acevedo
Anchor, Univision, USA
Level 2Journalist

Mamdouh AlMuhaini
General Manager, News Channel, Al Arabiya, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Journalist

Philip Aldrick
Economics Editor, Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Jenny Anderson
Senior Correspondent, Quartz – Atlantic Media, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Gerard Baker
Editor-at-Large, Wall Street Journal, USA
Level 2Journalist

Luke Baker
Deputy Bureau Chief and Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Thomson Reuters, Belgium
Level 2Journalist

Thorold Barker
Editor, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Wall Street Journal, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Maria Bartiromo
Anchor and Global Markets Editor, Fox Business Network, USA
Level 2Journalist

Sigurd Bjørnestad
Senior Economics Correspondent, Aftenposten, Norway
Level 2Journalist

Rebecca Blumenstein
Deputy Managing Editor, New York Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Keith Bradsher
Senior Writer, Asia Economics and Business, New York Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Sally Bundock
News Presenter, World Business Report, BBC World News, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Stephen Carroll
Senior Business Editor, France 24, France
Level 2Journalist

Matthew Caruana Galizia
Director, Daphne Caruana Galizia Foundation, Malta
Level 2Journalist

Olivia Chang
Anchor, CNNMoney Switzerland, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Jean-Paul Chapel
Editor, France 2, France
Level 2Journalist

Isabelle Chaperon
Economics and Business Editor, Le Monde, France
Level 2Journalist

Patrick Chappatte
Editorial Cartoonist and Founder, Globe Cartoon, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Julia Chatterley
Anchor, CNN, USA
Level 2Journalist

Elena Cherney
Coverage Planning Editor, Wall Street Journal, USA
Level 2Journalist

Hedwige Chevrillon
Editorialist, BFM Business, France
Level 2Journalist

Kenneth Choi Woo-Suk
Editor, Chosun Daily Newspaper, Republic of Korea
Level 2Journalist

Ed Conway
Economics Editor, Sky News, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

David Crow
Banking Editor, Financial Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Geoff Cutmore
Anchor, CNBC, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Sayuri Daimon
Executive Operating Officer; Senior Editorial Writer, Board of Editorial Writers, Japan Times, Japan
Level 2Journalist

John Defterios
Editor and Anchor, Emerging Markets, CNN Business, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Journalist

Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson
Business Editor, United States, Financial Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Sara Eisen
Co-Anchor, Squawk on the Street and Closing Bell, CNBC, USA
Level 2Journalist

Lawrence Elliott
Economics Editor, Guardian, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
Editor, International Business, Daily Telegraph, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Warren Jude Fernandez
Editor-in-Chief, Straits Times, Singapore
Level 2Journalist

Peter A. Fischer
Editor-in-Chief, Economics, Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ), Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Stephanie Flanders
Senior Executive Editor, Economics, Bloomberg, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Richard Fletcher
Business Editor, The Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Charles Forelle
Financial Editor, Wall Street Journal, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Rana Foroohar
Global Business Columnist and Associate Editor, Financial Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Thomas L. Friedman
Columnist, Foreign Affairs, New York Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Alessandra Galloni
Global Managing Editor, Reuters, Canada
Level 2Journalist

Hadley Gamble
Reporter and Anchor, CNBC, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

David Gelles
Reporter, New York Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Olaf Gersemann
Chief Business Editor, Welt am Sonntag, Germany
Level 2Journalist

Chris Giles
Economics Editor, Financial Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Urs Gredig
Head, Programmes, CNNMoney Switzerland, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Ali Hamadé
Editor and Columnist, An-Nahar, Lebanon
Level 2Journalist

Nadine Hani
Senior Presenter, Al Arabiya News Channel, United Arab Emirates
Level 2Journalist

Yuki Hasegawa
Deputy Managing Editor, Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan
Level 2Journalist

Jamie Heller
Business Editor, Wall Street Journal, USA
Level 2Journalist

Eyk Henning
Senior Global Business Reporter, Bloomberg News, Bloomberg, USA
Level 2Journalist

Peter Holmes à Court
Special Correspondent, Australian, Australia
Level 2Journalist

Otto C. Honegger
Television Journalist (1990-2008), Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Luciano Huck
Host, Rede Globo, Brazil
Level 2Journalist

Mishal Husain
Presenter, BBC News, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Isabell Hülsen
Journalist, Der Spiegel, Germany
Level 2Journalist

Greg Ip
Chief Economics Commentator, Wall Street Journal, USA
Level 2Journalist

Michael A. Jarlner
International Editor, Politiken.dk, Denmark
Level 2Journalist

Kamarul Bahrin Haron
Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Astro AWANI, Malaysia
Level 2Journalist

Sylvie Kauffmann
Editorial Director, Le Monde, France
Level 2Journalist

Tom Keene
Editor-at-Large, Bloomberg Television & Radio, USA
Level 2Journalist

Sarah Kelly
Anchor-at-Large, Deutsche Welle, USA
Level 2Journalist

Joe Kernen
Co-Anchor, Squawk Box, CNBC, USA
Level 2Journalist

Eveline Kobler
Economics Editor, SRF Radio, SRG SSR Generaldirektion (GD), Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Kenji Kohno
General Director, General Bureau for America; Executive Editor, NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation), Japan
Level 2Journalist

Kevin Krolicki
Asia News Editor, Thomson Reuters, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Isabelle Kumar
Journalist and Presenter, Euronews, France
Level 2Journalist

Francine Lacqua
Editor-at-Large and Presenter, Bloomberg Television, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Patrizia Laeri
Anchor, Swiss Television SRF, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Mark Landler
White House Correspondent, New York Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Li Sixuan
Anchor, China Central Television (CCTV), People’s Republic of China
Level 2Journalist

Li Xin
Managing Director, Caixin Global, Caixin Media, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Journalist

Heather Long
Economics Correspondent, Washington Post, USA
Level 2Journalist

Alexander “Sandy” MacIntyre
Vice-President, News, Associated Press Television News, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Masha Macpherson
News Editor and Senior Producer, Associated Press Television News (APTN), France
Level 2Journalist

Tonia Mastrobuoni
Correspondent, La Repubblica, Germany
Level 2Journalist

Anne McElvoy
Editor, Public Policy and Education, The Economist, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Carlos Mota
Columnist, Heraldo de Mexico, Mexico
Level 2Journalist

Sridhar Natarajan
Wall Street Reporter, Bloomberg, USA
Level 2Journalist

Cathy Newman
Presenter, Channel 4 News, ITN News, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Yasmin Osman
Banking Correspondent, Handelsblatt, Germany
Level 2Journalist

William Owens
Executive Producer, CBS News, USA
Level 2Journalist

Keld Louie Pedersen
International Economics Editor, Jyllands-Posten, Denmark
Level 2Journalist

Maren Peters
Economics Journalist, Swiss Radio and Television SRF, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Stanley Pignal
Correspondent, European Business and Finance, The Economist, France
Level 2Journalist

Markus Preiß
Bureau Chief, Brussels, ARD, Germany
Level 2Journalist

Richard Quest
Anchor, Quest Means Business, CNN International, USA
Level 2Journalist

Becky Quick
Co-Anchor, Squawk Box, CNBC, USA
Level 2Journalist

Gideon Rachman
Associate Editor and Chief Foreign Affairs Commentator, Financial Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Daniel Rittner
Columnist, Valor Econômico, Brazil
Level 2Journalist

Simon Robinson
Global Managing Editor, Newsroom, Reuters, Canada
Level 2Journalist

Darius Rochebin
Presenter, Swiss Television RTS, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Stefan Schmid
Economics Editor, Südostschweiz, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Meike Schreiber
Correspondent, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Germany
Level 2Journalist

Steve Sedgwick
Anchor, CNBC, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Carlos Segovia
Economics Correspondent; Deputy Editor, El Mundo, Spain
Level 2Journalist

Somini Sengupta
International Correspondent, Climate Change, New York Times, India
Level 2Journalist

Keir Simmons
Correspondent, NBC News, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Alison Snyder
Managing Editor, Axios, USA
Level 2Journalist

Andrew R. Sorkin
Editor-at-Large; Columnist, New York Times, USA
Level 2Journalist

Lino Terlizzi
Editorialist, Corriere del Ticino, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Gillian R. Tett
Editor-at-Large and Chair of the Editorial Board, Financial Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Ishaan Tharoor
Staff Writer, Foreign Affairs, Washington Post, USA
Level 2Journalist

Axel Threlfall
Editor-at-Large, Reuters, Canada
Level 2Journalist

Osman Ulagay
Senior Columnist and Editorial Adviser, Dünya Gazetesi, Turkey
Level 2Journalist

Pierre Veya
Economic Affairs Editor, Tamedia, Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Nicolas Vultier
Reporter; Head, International Newsdesk, News Department, Radio Télévision Suisse (RTS), Switzerland
Level 2Journalist

Lally Graham Weymouth
Senior Associate Editor, Washington Post, USA
Level 2Journalist

Bruce Whitfield
Presenter, The Money Show, 702 Talk Radio, Primedia, South Africa
Level 2Journalist

Martin Wolf
Associate Editor and Chief Economics Commentator, Financial Times, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Benjamin Wright
Business Editor, Daily Telegraph, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Xue Ying
Executive Director, Xinhua World Affairs Study Center, Xinhua News Agency, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Journalist

Yang Yanqing
Deputy Editor-in-Chief, Yicai Media Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 2Journalist

Yoon Won-Sup
Deputy Editor, Maeil Business Newspaper, Republic of Korea
Level 2Journalist

Fareed Zakaria
Host, Fareed Zakaria GPS, CNN, USA
Level 2Journalist

Marco Zatterin
Deputy Editor, Stampa, Italy
Level 2Journalist

Dmitry Zhdannikov
Editor, Energy, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Thomson Reuters, United Kingdom
Level 2Journalist

Christina Adriana de Wet
Executive Editor, Business Report, Independent Media, South Africa
Level 2Journalist

Benedikt von Imhoff
Wire Reporter, DPA – Deutsche Presse Agentur, Germany
Level 2Journalist

Mohammed Bin Abdulrahman Al Thani
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Qatar
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Valdis Dombrovskis
Executive Vice-President for an Economy that Works for People, European Commission
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Han Zheng
Vice-Premier of the People’s Republic of China
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Demeke Mekonnen Hassen
Deputy Prime Minister of Ethiopia
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Fuad Hussein
Deputy Prime Minister for Economic Affairs and Minister of Finance of Iraq
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Isabella Lövin
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Environment and Climate of Sweden
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Teresa Ribera
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for the Ecological Transition of Spain
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Jacek Sasin
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of State Assets of Poland
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Olaf Scholz
Vice-Chancellor and Federal Minister of Finance of Germany
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Maros Sefcovic
Vice-President for Interinstitutional Relations and Foresight, European Commission
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Frans Timmermans
Executive Vice-President for the European Green Deal, European Commission
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Truong Hoa Binh
Deputy Prime Minister of Viet Nam
Level 2Deputy Head of State/Government

Rasheed Al Maraj
Governor of the Central Bank of Bahrain
Level 3Top Central Bank

Reza Baqir
Governor, State Bank of Pakistan, Pakistan
Level 3Top Central Bank

Mark Carney
Governor of the Bank of England
Level 3Top Central Bank

Thomas J. Jordan
Chairman of the Governing Board of the Swiss National Bank
Level 3Top Central Bank

Lesetja Kganyago
Governor of the South African Reserve Bank (SARB)
Level 3Top Central Bank

Klaas Knot
President, Central Bank of the Netherlands (DNB), Netherlands
Level 3Top Central Bank

Haruhiko Kuroda
Governor of the Bank of Japan
Level 3Top Central Bank

Christine Lagarde
President, European Central Bank
Level 3Top Central Bank

Patrick Njoroge
Governor of the Central Bank of Kenya
Level 3Top Central Bank

Murat Uysal
Governor of the Central Bank of Turkey
Level 3Top Central Bank

Veerathai Santiprabhob
Governor of the Bank of Thailand
Level 3Top Central Bank

François Villeroy de Galhau
Governor of the Central Bank of France
Level 3Top Central Bank

Zainab Shamsuna Ahmed
Minister of Finance, Budget and National Planning of Nigeria
Level 3Minister

Ali Shareef Al Emadi
Minister of Finance of Qatar
Level 3Minister

Mohammad Abdullah Al Gergawi
Minister of Cabinet Affairs and the Future of the United Arab Emirates
Level 3Minister

Adel bin Ahmed Al Jubeir
Minister of State for Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Salman bin Khalifa Al Khalifa
Minister of Finance and National Economy of Bahrain
Level 3Minister

Ali Ahmed Al Kuwari
Minister of Commerce and Industry of Qatar
Level 3Minister

Riad Najib Abdul Rahman Al Malki
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Expatriates of the Palestinian National Authority
Level 3Minister

H.R.H. Prince Badr Bin Abdullah Bin Farhan Al Saud
Minister of Culture of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Ali bin Masoud bin Ali Al Sunaidy
Minister of Commerce and Industry; Deputy Chairman of the Supreme Council for Planning of Oman
Level 3Minister

Hassan Al Thawadi
Secretary-General, Supreme Committee for Delivery and Legacy, Qatar
Level 3Minister

Mohammad Al Tuwaijri
Minister of Economy and Planning of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Thani Ahmed Al Zeyoudi
Minister of Climate Change and Environment of the United Arab Emirates
Level 3Minister

Ibrahim A. Al-Assaf
Minister of State of Saudi Arabia, Member the Council of Ministers
Level 3Minister

Mohammed Al-Jadaan
Minister of Finance of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Majid Al-Kasabi
Minister of Commerce and Investment of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Rania Al-Mashat
Minister of International Cooperation of Egypt
Level 3Minister

Sultan Saeed Nasser AlMansoori
Minister of Economy of the United Arab Emirates
Level 3Minister

Abdullah AlSwaha
Minister of Communications and Information Technology of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Mohammed Shahriar Alam
State Minister for Foreign Affairs of Bangladesh
Level 3Minister

Berat Albayrak
Minister of Treasury and Finance of Turkey
Level 3Minister

Bandar Alkhorayef
Minister of Industry and Mineral Resources of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Vincenzo Amendola
Minister for European Affairs of Italy
Level 3Minister

Viola Amherd
Federal Councillor of Defence, Civil Protection and Sports of Switzerland
Level 3Minister

Gedu Andargachew Alene
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ethiopia
Level 3Minister

Magdalena Andersson
Minister of Finance of Sweden
Level 3Minister

Navdeep Bains
Minister of Innovation, Science and Industry of Canada
Level 3Minister

Gebran Bassil
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Emigrants of Lebanon
Level 3Minister

Alain Berset
Federal Councillor of Home Affairs of Switzerland
Level 3Minister

Yousuf Bin Alawi Bin Abdullah
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Oman
Level 3Minister

H.R.H. Prince Abdulaziz Bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Minister of Energy of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Vincent Biruta
Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of Rwanda
Level 3Minister

Shirley Ayorkor Botchwey
Minister of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration of Ghana
Level 3Minister

Thierry Breton
Commissioner for the Internal Market, European Commission
Level 3Minister

Bruno Bruins
Minister for Medical Care of the Netherlands
Level 3Minister

Nadia Calviño Santamaría
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Economic Affairs and Digital Transformation of Spain
Level 3Minister

Ignazio Cassis
Federal Councillor for Foreign Affairs of Switzerland
Level 3Minister

Mário Centeno
President of the Eurogroup; Minister of Finance of Portugal
Level 3Minister

Elaine L. Chao
Secretary of Transportation of the United States
Level 3Minister

Mathias Cormann
Minister for Finance; Leader of the Government in the Senate of Australia
Level 3Minister

Ignatius Darell Leiking
Minister of International Trade and Industry of Malaysia
Level 3Minister

Vera Daves de Sousa
Minister of Finance of Angola
Level 3Minister

Abdul Razak Dawood
Adviser to the Prime Minister, Federal Minister for Commerce, Textiles, Industry and Production, and Investment of Pakistan
Level 3Minister

Alexander De Croo
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance and International Development of Belgium
Level 3Minister

Nikola Dimitrov
Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of North Macedonia
Level 3Minister

Safeen Dizayee
Minister, Head of the Department of Foreign Relations of the Kurdistan Regional Government
Level 3Minister

Tarek El-Molla
Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources of Egypt
Level 3Minister

Moulay Hafid Elalamy
Minister of Industry, Trade, Investment and Digital Economy of Morocco
Level 3Minister

Ine Eriksen Søreide
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Norway
Level 3Minister

Alejandro Ferrer
Minister of Foreign Relations of Panama
Level 3Minister

Mariya Gabriel
Commissioner for Innovation, Research, Culture, Education and Youth, European Commission
Level 3Minister

Paolo Gentiloni
Commissioner for Economy, European Commission
Level 3Minister

Piyush Goyal
Minister of Railways and Minister of Commerce and Industry of India
Level 3Minister

Roberto Gualtieri
Minister of Economy and Finance of Italy
Level 3Minister

Paulo Guedes
Minister of Economy of Brazil
Level 3Minister

Pekka Haavisto
Minister for Foreign Affairs of Finland
Level 3Minister

Airlangga Hartarto
Coordinating Minister for Economic Affairs of Indonesia
Level 3Minister

Karel Havlíček
Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Industry and Trade of the Czech Republic
Level 3Minister

Wopke Hoekstra
Minister of Finance of the Netherlands
Level 3Minister

Phil Hogan
Commissioner for Trade, European Commission
Level 3Minister

Peter Hummelgaard
Minister for Employment of Denmark
Level 3Minister

Paula Ingabire
Minister of Information Communication Technology and Innovation of Rwanda
Level 3Minister

S Iswaran
Minister for Communications and Information; Minister-in-Charge of Trade Relations of Singapore
Level 3Minister

Sajid Javid
Chancellor of the Exchequer of the United Kingdom
Level 3Minister

Sigrid Kaag
Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation of the Netherlands
Level 3Minister

Agus Gumiwang Kartasasmita
Minister of Industry of Indonesia
Level 3Minister

Karin Keller-Sutter
Federal Councillor of Justice and Police of Switzerland
Level 3Minister

Jeppe Sebastian Kofod
Minister for Foreign Affairs of Denmark
Level 3Minister

Simon Kollerup
Minister for Industry, Business and Financial Affairs of Denmark
Level 3Minister

Tadeusz Kościński
Minister of Finance of Poland
Level 3Minister

Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer
Federal Minister of Defence of Germany
Level 3Minister

Lawrence Kudlow
Director, National Economic Council of USA
Level 3Minister

Miroslav Lajčák
Minister of Foreign and European Affairs of the Slovak Republic
Level 3Minister

Jean-Yves Le Drian
Minister of Europe and Foreign Affairs of France
Level 3Minister

Bruno Le Maire
Minister of Economy and Finance of France
Level 3Minister

Li Ganjie
Minister of Ecology and Environment of the People’s Republic of China
Level 3Minister

Ann Linde
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sweden
Level 3Minister

Ramon Lopez
Secretary of Trade and Industry of the Philippines
Level 3Minister

Ricardo Lozano
Minister of Environment and Sustainable Development of Colombia
Level 3Minister

Mansukh L. Mandaviya
Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Shipping and Minister of State for Chemicals and Fertilisers of India
Level 3Minister

Luiz Henrique Mandetta
Minister of Health of Brazil
Level 3Minister

Richard Martinez
Minister of Economy and Finance of Ecuador
Level 3Minister

Ueli Maurer
Federal Councillor of Finance of Switzerland
Level 3Minister

Tito Mboweni
Minister of Finance of South Africa
Level 3Minister

Zwelini Lawrence Mkhize
Minister of Health of South Africa
Level 3Minister

Steven Mnuchin
Secretary of the Treasury of the United States
Level 3Minister

William Francis Morneau
Minister of Finance of Canada
Level 3Minister

Graciela Márquez Colín
Secretary of the Economy of Mexico
Level 3Minister

Mthuli Ncube
Minister of Finance and Economic Development of Zimbabwe
Level 3Minister

Mary Ng
Minister of Small Business, Export Promotion and International Trade of Canada
Level 3Minister

Ning Jizhe
Vice-Chairman, National Development and Reform Commission, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Minister

Alexander Novak
Minister of Energy of the Russian Federation
Level 3Minister

Maxim Oreshkin
Minister of Economic Development of the Russian Federation
Level 3Minister

Lucas Palacios Covarrubias
Minister of Economy, Development and Tourism of Chile
Level 3Minister

Luhut B. Pandjaitan
Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment of Indonesia
Level 3Minister

Grace Naledi Mandisa Pandor
Minister of International Relations and Cooperation of South Africa
Level 3Minister

Park Young-sun
Minister of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises and Start-ups of the Republic of Korea
Level 3Minister

David Parker
Attorney-General; Minister of Economic Development, Minister for the Environment and Minister for Trade and Export Growth of New Zealand
Level 3Minister

Guy Parmelin
Federal Councillor for Economic Affairs, Education and Research of Switzerland
Level 3Minister

Ebrahim Patel
Minister of Trade and Industry of South Africa
Level 3Minister

Ruhsar Pekcan
Minister of Trade of Turkey
Level 3Minister

Johnny Gerard Plate
Minister of Communication and Information Technology of Indonesia
Level 3Minister

Suresh Prabhakar Prabhu
Indian Prime Minister’s G20 Sherpa
Level 3Minister

Vadym Prystaiko
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine
Level 3Minister

Muriel Pénicaud
Minister of Labour of France
Level 3Minister

Makhdoom Shah Mehmood Qureshi
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan
Level 3Minister

Wissam Rabadi
Minister of Planning and International Cooperation of Jordan
Level 3Minister

Jose Manuel Restrepo
Minister of Trade, Industry and Tourism of Colombia
Level 3Minister

Carlos Manuel Rodríguez Echandi
Minister of Environment and Energy of Costa Rica
Level 3Minister

Alfonso Romo Garza
Chief of the Office of the President of Mexico
Level 3Minister

Wilbur L. Ross
Secretary of Commerce of the United States
Level 3Minister

Eugene Scalia
Secretary of Labor of the United States
Level 3Minister

Peggy Onkutlwile Serame
Minister of Investment, Trade and Industry of Botswana
Level 3Minister

Abdul Hafeez Shaikh
Adviser to the Prime Minister, Federal Minister for Finance of Pakistan
Level 3Minister

Tharman Shanmugaratnam
Chairman, Monetary Authority of Singapore; Senior Minister of Singapore
Level 3Minister

Jens Spahn
Federal Minister of Health of Germany
Level 3Minister

Maria Fernanda Suarez
Minister of Mines and Energy of Colombia
Level 3Minister

Agus Suparmanto Subagio
Minister of Trade of Indonesia
Level 3Minister

Bakyt Sultanov
Minister of Trade and Integration of Kazakhstan
Level 3Minister

Sun Chanthol
Senior Minister; Minister of Public Works and Transport of Cambodia
Level 3Minister

Suvit Maesincee
Minister of Higher Education, Science, Research and Innovation of Thailand
Level 3Minister

Timipre Marlin Sylva
Minister of State for Petroleum Resources of Nigeria
Level 3Minister

Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson
Cardinal, Prefect of the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development of the Vatican City State
Level 3Minister

Maryam Uwais
Special Adviser on Social Investment Programmes to the President of Nigeria
Level 3Minister

José Valencia
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ecuador
Level 3Minister

Yoo Myung-hee
Minister of Trade of the Republic of Korea
Level 3Minister

H.H. Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia
Level 3Minister

Sheikh Khalid bin Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan
Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Executive Office and Deputy National Security Adviser of the United Arab Emirates
Level 3Minister

Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu
Minister of Foreign Affairs of Turkey
Level 3Minister

Masatsugu Asakawa
President, Asian Development Bank, Manila
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Roberto Azevêdo
Director-General, World Trade Organization (WTO), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Mohammad Sanusi Barkindo
Secretary-General, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), Vienna
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

David Beasley
Executive Director, United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), Rome
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Fatih Birol
Executive Director, International Energy Agency, Paris
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Winnie Byanyima
United Nations Undersecretary-General; Executive Director, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Alicia Bárcena Ibarra
Executive Secretary, United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), Santiago
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Agustin Carstens
General Manager, Bank for International Settlements (BIS), Basel
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Sumantra Chakrabarti
President, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), London
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Catherine De Bolle
Executive Director, Europol (European Union Agency for Law Enforcement Cooperation), The Hague
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Henrietta H. Fore
Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), New York
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus
Director-General, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Filippo Grandi
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Thomas Greminger
Secretary-General, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), Vienna
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Angel Gurría
Secretary-General, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Paris
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Gilbert Fossoun Houngbo
President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), Rome
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Naoko Ishii
Chief Executive Officer and Chairperson, Global Environment Facility, Washington DC
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Natalia Kanem
Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), New York
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Shinichi Kitaoka
President, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Japan
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Marie Lam-Frendo
Chief Executive Officer, Global Infrastructure Hub, Australia
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Kitack Lim
Secretary-General, International Maritime Organization (IMO), London
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Fang Liu
Secretary-General, International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Montreal
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Mark Lowcock
Undersecretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), New York
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Peter Maurer
President, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Kunio Mikuriya
Secretary-General, World Customs Organization (WCO), Brussels
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka
Undersecretary-General and Executive Director, United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN), New York
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Luis Alberto Moreno
President, Inter-American Development Bank, Washington DC
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Dongyu Qu
Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Klaus P. Regling
Managing Director, European Stability Mechanism (ESM), Luxembourg
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Terje Roed-Larsen
President, International Peace Institute (IPI), Austria
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Guy Ryder
Director-General, International Labour Organization (ILO), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Achim Steiner
Administrator, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), New York
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Jürgen Stock
Secretary-General, International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), Lyon
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Jens Stoltenberg
Secretary-General, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Brussels
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Peter Thomson
United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the Ocean, New York
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Tatiana Valovaya
Director-General, United Nations Geneva (UNOG), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Zhao Houlin
Secretary-General, International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Geneva
Level 3Head of International Org./Deputy Head of Top International Org.

Paul Achleitner
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Deutsche Bank, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Christina Ahmadjian
Member of the Board; Member, Audit and Supervisory Committee, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Japan
Level 3Board Member

David Aikman
Chief Representative Officer, China, Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Khalid Al Dabbagh
Senior Vice-President, Finance, Strategy and Development, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia
Level 3Board Member

Mohamad Al Jounde
Member of the Board, Gharsah Sweden, Sweden
Level 3Board Member

Adel Al Redha
Chief Operating Officer, Emirates Airline, United Arab Emirates
Level 3Board Member

Khalid Al Rumaihi
Member of the Board, Bahrain Economic Development Board, Bahrain
Level 3Board Member

Henadi Al Saleh
Chair of the Board of Directors, Agility, Kuwait
Level 3Board Member

Essa Al Saleh
President and Chief Executive Officer, Global Integrated Logistics, Agility, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Mohammed K. A. Al-Faisal
Chairman, Saudi Telecom Company Group, Saudi Arabia
Level 3Board Member

Mohammed Talal Al-Nahas
Member of the Board, Saudi Basic Industries (SABIC), Saudi Arabia
Level 3Board Member

Mohammed Saif Al-Sowaidi
President, Qatar Investment Authority Advisory USA, USA
Level 3Board Member

Erica Alessandri
Member of the Board, Technogym, Italy
Level 3Board Member

Thomas Thune Andersen
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Ørsted, Denmark
Level 3Board Member

Marisol Argueta de Barillas
Head of the Regional Agenda, Latin America; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Maria Antonia Arroyo
Principal and Co-Founder, Ignite Impact Fund, Philippines
Level 3Board Member

Jennifer Artley
Managing Director, Technology, Life Sciences and Business Services, BT Group, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Sanjiv Bajaj
Managing Director, Bajaj Finserv, India
Level 3Board Member

Manvinder Singh Banga
Partner, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Cornelius Baur
Managing Partner, Germany and Austria, McKinsey & Company, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Klaus Becker
Chief Executive Officer, KPMG, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Arnaud Bernaert
Head of Shaping the Future of Health and Health Care, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Markus Berni
Senior Counsel, Baker McKenzie, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Flemming Besenbacher
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Carlsberg Group, Denmark
Level 3Board Member

Marwan Bin Haidar
Executive Vice-President, Innovation and the Future, Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, United Arab Emirates
Level 3Board Member

Roberto Bocca
Head of Shaping the Future of Energy and Materials; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Børge Brende
President, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Matt Brittin
President, Business and Operations, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Google, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Pascale Bruderer
Member of the Council of States, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Sebastian Buckup
Head of Programming, Global Programming Group; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Jacob Hubert Linus Burda
Member of the Administrative Board, Burda Media, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Denise Burnet
Senior Adviser on France to the President, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Jaime Caballero Uribe
Chief Financial Officer, Ecopetrol, Colombia
Level 3Board Member

Oliver Cann
Head of Strategic Communications; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Maria Carceller Arce
Member of the Executive Board, Damm, Disa, Spain
Level 3Board Member

Chang Soon-Young
Member of the Board, DP World, United Arab Emirates
Level 3Board Member

Chen Lifang
Director of the Board; President, Public Affairs and Communications Department, Huawei Technologies, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Chey Jae-Won
Executive Vice-Chairman, SK Group, Republic of Korea
Level 3Board Member

Laura Chinchilla
Chair, Kofi Annan Commission on Elections and Democracy in the Digital Age, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Monique Cohen Amon
Member of the Board, SICPA, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Liam Condon
President, Bayer Crop Science, Bayer, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Jean-Philippe Courtois
President, Global Sales, Marketing and Operations; Executive Vice-President, Microsoft, France
Level 3Board Member

Stephanie Czerny
Managing Director, DLD Media, Burda Media, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Francisco D’Souza
Vice-Chairman, Cognizant, USA
Level 3Board Member

Paul Daugherty
Chief Technology and Innovation Officer, Accenture, USA
Level 3Board Member

Jose Vicente De Los Mozos Obispo
Deputy Chief Executive Officer; Executive Vice-President, Manufacturing, Groupe Renault, France
Level 3Board Member

Jo Deblaere
Chief Operating Officer; Group Chief Executive, Europe, Accenture, Belgium
Level 3Board Member

Philippe Delorme
Executive Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer, Energy Management Business, Schneider Electric, France
Level 3Board Member

Olga Dergunova
Deputy President; Chairman of the Management Board, VTB Bank, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Jean-Christophe G. Deslarzes
Chair, Compensation Committee, Governance and Nomination Committee, Adecco Group, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Allison Dew
Chief Marketing Officer, Dell Technologies, USA
Level 3Board Member

Michael Ding
Global Executive Director, Envision Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Alan Doss
President, Kofi Annan Foundation, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Silvio Dulinsky
Head of Business Engagement, Latin America; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Mirek Dusek
Deputy Head of the Centre for Geopolitical and Regional Affairs; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

John Dutton
Head of Forum Foundations; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Paul N. Eckley
Senior Vice-President, Investments, State Farm Insurance, USA
Level 3Board Member

Hassan El Houry
Chief Executive Officer, National Aviation Services, Kuwait
Level 3Board Member

Hans-Ulrich Engel
Vice-Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors; Chief Financial Officer, BASF, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Morten Engelstoft
Chief Executive Officer, APM Terminals, A.P. Moeller Maersk, Netherlands
Level 3Board Member

Mary Callahan Erdoes
Chief Executive Officer, Asset and Wealth Management, JP Morgan, USA
Level 3Board Member

Michael Ettinger
Senior Vice-President, Corporate and Legal Affairs; Chief of Staff, Henry Schein, USA
Level 3Board Member

Isabel Fernandez
Member of the Management Board; Global Head, Wholesale Banking, ING Group, Netherlands
Level 3Board Member

Anne Finucane
Vice-Chairman, Bank of America, USA
Level 3Board Member

Adaire Fox-Martin
Member of the Executive Board, SAP, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Karen Frank
Chief Executive Officer, Private Bank, Barclays, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Nigel Frudd
Managing Executive Officer, Sompo Holdings, Japan
Level 3Board Member

Guido Fuerer
Group Chief Investment Officer and Member of the Executive Committee, Swiss Re, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

David Garfield
Managing Director; Leader, Americas Region, AlixPartners, USA
Level 3Board Member

Adam Garrard
Chief Executive Officer, Corporate Risk and Broking, Willis Towers Watson, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Julien Gattoni
Managing Director; Chief Financial Officer, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Richard J. Gnodde
Chief Executive Officer, Goldman Sachs International, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Malte Godbersen
Head of Technology and Digital Services; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Pawan Goenka
Managing Director, Mahindra & Mahindra, India
Level 3Board Member

Kate Gutmann
Chief Revenue Officer; Senior Vice-President, Sales and Solutions, UPS, USA
Level 3Board Member

Camilla Hagen Sørli
Member of the Board, Canica, Norway
Level 3Board Member

Juerg Haller
Chairman of the Board, Bank J. Safra Sarasin, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Feridun Hamdullahpur
Director of the Board, AMTD, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 3Board Member

Maryanne Hancock
Chief Executive Officer, Y Analytics, USA
Level 3Board Member

John Harris
Founding Editor, Politico, USA
Level 3Board Member

Josh Harris
Executive Vice-President, Palantir Technologies, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Mark Hawkins
President and Chief Financial Officer, Salesforce, USA
Level 3Board Member

Marco Herbst
Partner, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Peter Herweck
Executive Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer, Industrial Automation, Schneider Electric, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Kevin Hewitt
Chairman, Europe, Middle East and Africa, FTI Consulting, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Kevin T. Hogan
Executive Vice-President and Chief Executive Officer, Life and Retirement, AIG, USA
Level 3Board Member

Richard Houston
Chief Executive Officer, North and South Europe, Deloitte, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Kristin Hughes
Director, Global Plastics Action Partnership; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Hisayuki Idekoba
Chief Operating Officer; Chief Sustainability Officer; Chief Risk Officer; Senior Managing Corporate Executive Officer; Director of the Board, Recruit Holdings, Japan
Level 3Board Member

Kazuo Inada
Senior Vice-President; Chief Regional Officer, Turkey; General Manager, Istanbul Branch, Mitsubishi, Turkey
Level 3Board Member

Greg Jensen
Co-Chief Investment Officer, Bridgewater Associates, USA
Level 3Board Member

Leif Johansson
Chairman of the Board, AstraZeneca, Sweden
Level 3Board Member

Mohit Joshi
President; Head, Financial Services, Insurance, Healthcare and Life Sciences, Infosys, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Jeremy Jurgens
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Surya Kant
President, North America, Europe and United Kingdom, Tata Consultancy Services, USA
Level 3Board Member

Elsie S. Kanza
Head of the Regional Agenda, Africa; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Harald Kayser
Chairman of the Management Board and Senior Partner, PwC Europe, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Valery Kazikaev
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Baikal Mining, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Ajay M. Khimji
Director, Khimji Ramdas Group, Sultanate of Oman
Level 3Board Member

Gunnar Kilian
Chief Human Resources Officer, Member of the Managing Board, Volkswagen Group, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Vikram Kirloskar
President, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), India
Level 3Board Member

Alison Kitchen
Chairman, KPMG, Australia
Level 3Board Member

Manuel Kohnstamm
Senior Vice-President and Chief Corporate Affairs Officer, Liberty Global, USA
Level 3Board Member

Keiji Kojima
Executive Vice-President; Executive Officer; Chief Information Security Officer, Hitachi, Japan
Level 3Board Member

Ram Krishnan
Global Chief Commercial Officer and Chief Executive Officer, Greater China, PepsiCo, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Subhash Kumar
Director, Finance, Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC), India
Level 3Board Member

Stanislav Kuznetsov
Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Anja Langenbucher
Director, Europe, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Jose Larocca
Member of the Board, Puma Energy, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Andrew LeSueur
Global Managing Partner, Heidrick Consulting, Heidrick & Struggles, USA
Level 3Board Member

Jerry Zhe Li
Deputy Director, Strategy, Innovation and Technology, MTR, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 3Board Member

John Lindfors
Managing Partner, DST Investment Management, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 3Board Member

Andrew N. Liveris
Member of the Board of Directors, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia
Level 3Board Member

Kevin Lynch
Vice-Chairman, BMO Financial Group, Canada
Level 3Board Member

Mario Mesquita
Chief Economist, Itaú Unibanco, Brazil
Level 3Board Member

Berry J. Marttin
Member of the Executive Board, Rabobank, Netherlands
Level 3Board Member

Elena Martynova
Managing Director, USM Holdings, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Neil Masterson
Co-Chief Operating Officer, Thomson Reuters, USA
Level 3Board Member

Jeffrey May
President, Global Public Policy, MSD, USA
Level 3Board Member

Lindiwe Mazibuko
Co-Founder and Executive Director, Apolitical Foundation, South Africa
Level 3Board Member

Mark McCombe
Senior Managing Director; Global Head, Institutional Client Business and Chairman, Alternative Investors, BlackRock, USA
Level 3Board Member

Ryan McInerney
President, Visa, USA
Level 3Board Member

Viraj Mehta
Head of Regional Agenda, India and South Asia; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Xavier Mesnard
Lead Partner, Strategic Operations Practice, Kearney, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Mauricio Minas
Member of the Board and Executive Vice-President, Banco Bradesco, Brazil
Level 3Board Member

Brigitte Mohn
Member of the Executive Board, Bertelsmann Stiftung, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Julie Monaco
Managing Director; Global Head, Public Sector Coverage, Corporate and Investment Banking, Citi, USA
Level 3Board Member

Adrian Monck
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Thomas K. Montag
Chief Operating Officer, Bank of America, USA
Level 3Board Member

Alexey Motlokhov
Adviser to the Chief Executive Officer, Investment Matters, PhosAgro, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Shahmar Movsumov
Member of the Supervisory Board, State Oil Fund of the Republic of Azerbaijan (SOFAZ), Azerbaijan
Level 3Board Member

Christian Mumenthaler
Group Chief Executive Officer, Swiss Re, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

David Nabarro
Director, 4SD, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Masato Nakagawa
Executive Fellow, Global Technical Affairs, DENSO, Japan
Level 3Board Member

Koichi Narasaki
Group Chief Digital Officer, Executive Vice-President and Executive Officer, Sompo Holdings, Japan
Level 3Board Member

Sarita Nayyar
Managing Director; Chief Operating Officer, USA, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Scott Neal
Senior Vice-President, Worldwide Sales, Gulfstream Aerospace, USA
Level 3Board Member

Cedrik Neike
Member of the Managing Board, Siemens, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Ni Xia
Director, Office of the President, Mengniu Group, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Thomas Nides
Vice-Chairman, Morgan Stanley, USA
Level 3Board Member

Lars G. Nordström
Chairman of the Board, Vattenfall, Sweden
Level 3Board Member

David Novak
Co-President, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Vadym Novynskyi
Chairman, Smart-Holding, Ukraine
Level 3Board Member

Motoyasu Nozaki
Managing Officer and Chief Operating Officer, Mitsui & Co., Japan
Level 3Board Member

Hajime Nozawa
President and Chief Executive Officer, JTB Tourism Research and Consulting, Japan
Level 3Board Member

Thomas Ogilvie
Member of the Board, Human Resources and Corporate Incubation, Deutsche Post DHL, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Roman Palac
Member of the Management Board, PZU, Poland
Level 3Board Member

Park Jung-Ho
Chief Executive Officer, SK Telecom, Republic of Korea
Level 3Board Member

Gavin Patterson
Chairman, Europe, Salesforce, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Brian Peccarelli
Chief Operating Officer, Customer Markets, Thomson Reuters, USA
Level 3Board Member

Daniel Pinto
Co-President and Chief Operating Officer, JPMorgan Chase; Chief Executive Officer, Corporate and Investment Bank, J.P Morgan, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Marc Pritchard
Chief Brand Officer, Procter & Gamble, USA
Level 3Board Member

Alexander Pumpyanskiy
Board Member, TMK, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Roopa Purushothaman
Chief Economist; Head, Policy Advocacy, Tata Consultancy Services, India
Level 3Board Member

Roberto Quarta
Partner and Chairman, Europe, Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Matthew A. Quinn
Chief Operating Officer, TIBCO Software, USA
Level 3Board Member

David Rawlinson
Member of the Board, Nielsen, USA
Level 3Board Member

Thomas Reichert
Chairman, Global Practices; Global Leader, DigitalBCG, Boston Consulting Group, USA
Level 3Board Member

Ren Zhengfei
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Huawei Technologies, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Andreas Rittstieg
Member of the Executive Board, Burda Media, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Jörg Rockenhäuser
Managing Partner, Germany, Switzerland and Austria, Permira Beteiligungsberatung, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Mel Rogers
Head of Strategic Affairs; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Ivan Romanovsky
Vice-President, Americas, West Africa and Europe, LUKOIL, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Jeffrey Allen Rosen
Deputy Chairman, Lazard, USA
Level 3Board Member

Don Rosenberg
Executive Vice-President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, Qualcomm, USA
Level 3Board Member

James Rosenfield
Senior Vice-President, IHS Markit, USA
Level 3Board Member

Roland Rudd
Chairman, Finsbury, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Joan Ruff
Chair of the Board of Directors, AARP, USA
Level 3Board Member

Stephan Ruiz
Head of Group Controlling and Head of Finance and Operations USA, Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Patricia F. Russo
Chairman of the Board of Directors, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, USA
Level 3Board Member

Roland Sackers
Chief Financial Officer, QIAGEN, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Rachel Samrén
Executive Vice-President, Chief External Affairs Officer, Milicom, USA
Level 3Board Member

Dev Sanyal
Chief Executive, Alternative Energy; Executive Vice-President, Regions, BP, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Philipp Schindler
Senior Vice-President and Chief Business Officer, Google, USA
Level 3Board Member

Nancy Schlichting
Vice-Chair, Duke Health, USA
Level 3Board Member

Olivier M. Schwab
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Veronica Scotti
Chairperson, Public Sector Solutions, Swiss Re Management, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Michael Sen
Member of the Managing Board, Siemens, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Anish Shah
Group President, Strategy; Member of the Group Executive Board, Mahindra Group, India
Level 3Board Member

Yawar Shah
Chairman of the Board of Directors, SWIFT, Belgium
Level 3Board Member

Arun Sharma
Member of the Board, Adani Abbot Point Terminal, Australia
Level 3Board Member

Duco Sickinghe
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, KPN, Netherlands
Level 3Board Member

Ali Raza Siddiqui
Chairman, JS Group, Pakistan
Level 3Board Member

Bradford L. Smith
President, Microsoft, USA
Level 3Board Member

Francisco Soares dos Santos
Member of the Board, Jerónimo Martins, Portugal
Level 3Board Member

Yuri Soloviev
First Deputy President and Chairman of the Management Board, VTB Bank, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Garen K. Staglin
Chairman and Co-Founder, One Mind, USA
Level 3Board Member

Paul Stoffels
Vice-Chairman of the Executive Committee; Chief Scientific Officer, Johnson & Johnson, USA
Level 3Board Member

Ivan Streshinsky
Member of the Board of Directors, USM Holdings, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Norifumi Sugimoto
Managing Executive Officer, Development Bank of Japan (DBJ), Japan
Level 3Board Member

Chang Sun
Co-Managing Partner, TPG Capital, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 3Board Member

Olaug Johanne Svarva
Chair; Non-Executive Director, DNB Bank, Norway
Level 3Board Member

Masao Takahashi
Head of Institutional Membership; Member of Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Tony Tan Keng Yam
Director and Special Adviser, GIC, Singapore
Level 3Board Member

Anderson Tanoto
Director, RGE, Singapore
Level 3Board Member

Alan Tennenberg
Chief Medical Officer, Global Public Health, Johnson & Johnson, USA
Level 3Board Member

Peter Terwiesch
President, Industrial Automation; Member of the Group Executive Committee, ABB, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Tian Wei
Host, World Insight with Tian Wei, China Global Television Network (CGTN), People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Pia Tischhauser
Global Leader, Insurance; Member, Group Executive Committee; Managing Director; Senior Partner, Boston Consulting Group, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Graves Tompkins
Global Head, Capital Partnering, General Atlantic Partners, USA
Level 3Board Member

Terri Toyota
Deputy Head of the Centre for Global Public Goods; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

John Randal Tyson
Chief Sustainability Officer, Tyson Foods, USA
Level 3Board Member

Shrikant Madhav Vaidya
Director, Refineries, Indian Oil, India
Level 3Board Member

Sergey Vakulenko
Head, Strategy and Innovations Department, Gazprom Neft, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Alexander Vedyakhin
First Deputy Chairman of the Executive Board, Sberbank, Russian Federation
Level 3Board Member

Dominique Velter
Director, Strategic Marketing, Compagnie Financière Tradition, Switzerland
Level 3Board Member

Grazia Vittadini
Chief Technology Officer, Airbus, France
Level 3Board Member

Renate Wagner
Member of the Board of Management, Allianz, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Gunn Warsted
Chair, Telenor Group, Norway
Level 3Board Member

Dominic Kailash Nath Waughray
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Amy Weaver
President, Legal and Corporate Affairs, Salesforce, USA
Level 3Board Member

Martin Weiss
Member of the Executive Board, Hubert Burda Media, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Kathy Wengel
Executive Vice-President and Chief Global Supply Chain Officer, Johnson & Johnson, USA
Level 3Board Member

Bernadette Wightman
Managing Director, Banking and Financial Services, BT Group, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Hildegard Wortmann
Member of the Board of Management, Sales and Marketing, Audi, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Lida Yan
Director; President, Enterprise Business Group, Huawei Technologies, People’s Republic of China
Level 3Board Member

Paco Ybarra
Chief Executive Officer, Institutional Clients Group, Citi, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Saadia Zahidi
Managing Director, World Economic Forum
Level 3Board Member

Oscar de Bok
Chief Executive Officer, DHL Supply Chain; Member of the Board of Management, Deutsche Post DHL, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Tom de Swaan
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, ABN AMRO, Netherlands
Level 3Board Member

Stefano del Punta
Chief Financial Officer, Intesa Sanpaolo, Italy
Level 3Board Member

Jan du Plessis
Group Chairman, BT Group, United Kingdom
Level 3Board Member

Jeroen van der Veer
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Royal Philips, Netherlands
Level 3Board Member

Karl von Rohr
Member of the Management Board, Deutsche Bank, Germany
Level 3Board Member

Greg Abbott
Governor of Texas, USA
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Thomas Aeschi
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

H.H. Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al Maktoum
Chairman, Dubai Supreme Fiscal Committee; President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Dubai Civil Aviation Authority (DCAA), United Arab Emirates
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Bodour Al Qasimi
Chairperson, Sharjah Investment and Development Authority – Shurooq, United Arab Emirates
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Alice Bunn
Director, International, UK Space Agency, United Kingdom
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Roland Rino Büchel
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Marcus Caduff
Councillor, Canton of Grisons, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Mario Cavigelli
Councillor; Head, Department of Construction, Transport and Forestry, Canton of Grisons, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Damien Jacques André Cottier
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

João Doria
Governor of the State of São Paulo, Brazil
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Stefan Engler
Member of the Council of States, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Yvette Estermann
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Jean-Philippe Gaudin
Head of the Swiss Intelligence Service, Federal Department of Defence, Civil Protection and Sports of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Rached Ghannouchi
Speaker of the Assembly of the Representatives of the People of Tunisia
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Bastien Girod
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Niklaus-Samuel Gugger
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Robert Habeck
Party Leader, Alliance 90/The Greens, Germany
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Antonio Hodgers
President of the Geneva Government; State Councillor, Department of Territorial Development, Canton of Geneva, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Roger Köppel
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Carrie Lam
Chief Executive of Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

François Legault
Premier of Quebec, Canada
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Christa Markwalder
Vice-President of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National Council of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Magdalena Martullo-Blocher
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Guruprasad Mohapatra
Secretary, Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade, India
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Isabelle Moret
President of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Kamal Nath
Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh, India
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Eric Nussbaumer
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Jon Domenic Parolini
Councillor; Head, Department for Economic and Social Affairs, Canton of Grisons, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Peter Peyer
Councillor, Canton of Grisons, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Christian Rathgeb
President of the Government of the Canton of Grisons; Head, Finance and Communities, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Martin Schmid
Member of the Council of States, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Elisabeth Schneider-Schneiter
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Amarinder Singh
Chief Minister of Punjab, India
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Hans Stöckli
President of the Council of States, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Markus Söder
Minister-President of the State of Bavaria, Germany
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Thomas Süssli
Chief of the Armed Forces, Federal Department of Defence, Civil Protection and Sports of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

H.R.H. The Prince of Wales
The Prince of Wales
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Walter Thurnherr
Federal Chancellor of the Swiss Confederation
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Laurent Wehrli
Member of the National Council, Swiss Parliament, Switzerland
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

B. S. Yediyurappa
Chief Minister of Karnataka, India
Level 4Sub-National/Regional Head

Tania Aidrus
Head, Digital Pakistan Initiative, Office of the Prime Minister of Pakistan
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Eiman Al Mutairi
Assistant Minister of Commerce and Investment, Ministry of Commerce and Investment of Saudi Arabia
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Anas Alfaris
President, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), Saudi Arabia
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Manpreet Badal
Minister of Finance and Planning of Punjab, India
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Khalfan Belhoul
Chief Executive Officer, Dubai Future Foundation, United Arab Emirates
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Ahmad bin Abdullah Humaid Belhoul Al Falasi
Minister of State for Higher Education and Advanced Skills of the United Arab Emirates
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

H.R.H. Prince Khalid Bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud
Deputy Minister of Defence, Ministry of Defence and Aviation of Saudi Arabia
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Abdulla Bin Touq
Secretary-General, Cabinet of the United Arab Emirates
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Carlos Alexandre Da Costa
Deputy Minister for Productivity, Employment and Competitiveness, Ministry of Economy of Brazil
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

H.R.H. Prince Daniel of Sweden
Prince of Sweden and Duke of Västergötland
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Bernard Emié
General Director for External Security, Ministry of the Armed Forces of France
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Fang Xinghai
Vice-Chairman, China Securities Regulatory Commission, People’s Republic of China
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Mario Gattiker
State Secretary for Migration of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Martina Hirayama
State Secretary for Education and Research and Innovation of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Yoshiki Hiruma
Vice-President, Sustainability Management; Director, Enterprise Resilience Rated Loan Programme, Development Bank of Japan (DBJ), Japan
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Marie-Gabrielle Ineichen-Fleisch
State Secretary for Economic Affairs of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Kairat Kelimbetov
Governor, Astana International Financial Centre Authority, Kazakhstan
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Keith Krach
Undersecretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy and the Environment of the United States
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Jared Kushner
Assistant to the President and Senior Adviser to the President of the United States
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Bahlil Lahadalia
Chairman, Indonesia Investment Coordinating Board (BKPM), Indonesia
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Robert E. Lighthizer
United States Trade Representative
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Ma Zhaoxu
Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Hideki Makihara
State Minister, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan, Japan, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan, Japan
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Hiromichi Mizuno
Executive Managing Director and Chief Investment Officer, Government Pension Investment Fund (GPIF), Japan
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

John M. Mulvaney
Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Office of Management and Budget (OMB), USA
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Agnès Pannier-Runacher
Secretary of State, Ministry of Economy and Finance of France
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Peng Huagang
Member of the CPC Committee; Secretary-General, State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC), People’s Republic of China
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Claire Perry O’Neill
President of COP26, Cabinet Office, Her Majesty’s Government, United Kingdom
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Brune Poirson
Secretary of State, Ministry of Ecological and Inclusive Transition of France
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

K T Rama Rao
Minister of Information Technology, Industries, Municipal Administration and Urban Development of Telangana, India
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Daniela Stoffel
State Secretary for International Finance of Switzerland
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Eyob Tekalign Tolina
State Minister of Finance, Ministry for Finance and Economy of Ethiopia
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Marcos Troyjo
Deputy Minister of the Economy for Foreign Trade and International Affairs of Brazil
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Kenji Wakamiya
State Minister, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Japan
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Edward Yau
Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development of Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Alexander William Younger
Chief, Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), United Kingdom
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Yu Jianhua
Vice-Minister, Ministry of Commerce of the People’s Republic of China
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Zhu Min
Chairman, National Institute of Financial Research, People’s Republic of China
Level 4Sub-Ministerial Post

Abdulla Bin Khalifa Al Khalifa
Chief Executive Officer, Osool Asset Management, Bahrain
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Faisal Bin Thani Al-Thani
Head, Regional Portfolios, Qatar Investment Authority, Qatar
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jim Alkove
Chief Trust Officer, Salesforce, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Sheila Alrowaily
Chief Executive Officer, Wisayah Global Investments, Saudi Arabia
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Judson Althoff
Executive Vice-President, Worldwide Commercial Business, Microsoft, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Dean Athanasia
President, Consumer and Small Business, Bank of America, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Stephen Bamford
Co-Head, Global Fundraising, TPG, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Ángel Bautista
Director, Institutional Relations, Repsol, Spain
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Emma Benameur
Managing Director; Chief People and Culture Officer, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Herman Betten
Senior Director, Strategic Partnerships and Engagement, Royal DSM, Netherlands
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Kelly Bissell
Senior Managing Director, Accenture Security, Accenture, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Matthew Blake
Head of Shaping the Future of Financial and Monetary Systems; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Cheryl Buss
Chief Executive, Absa International, Absa Securities UK, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Thomas Campion
Head, Corporate and Investment Banking, Northern Hemisphere, Itau BBA International, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Neil Carr
President, Coatings and Performance Monomers Business; President, Europe, Middle East, Africa and India, Dow, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Matthew Chamberlain
Chief Executive, London Metal Exchange, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Brian Chin
Chief Executive Officer, Global Markets, Credit Suisse, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Andrew Chiu
Vice-Chairman, AMTD, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Bechara Choucair
Chief Community Health Officer, Kaiser Permanente, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Wei Sun Christianson
Co-Chief Executive Officer, Asia-Pacific; Chief Executive Officer, China, Morgan Stanley, People’s Republic of China
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jared Cohen
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Jigsaw, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Simon Cooper
Chief Executive, Corporate, Commercial and Institutional Banking, Standard Chartered Bank, Singapore
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Hilary Cottam
Author and Social Entrepreneur, Centre for the Fifth Social Revolution, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

William “Mo” Cowan
President, Global Government Affairs and Policy, GE, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Stephen Dainton
Global Head, Markets, Barclays, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Caio David
Chief Executive Officer, Itaú BBA, Brazil
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Laura Deaner
Global Chief Information Security Officer, S&P Global, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Mary Ann Deignan
Managing Director, Shareholder Advisory, Lazard, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Tyler Dickson
Global Co-Head, Banking, Capital Markets and Advisory, Citi, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Sean Doherty
Head of International Trade and Investment, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Markus Dohle
Chief Executive Officer, Penguin Random House, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Mary Draves
Chief Sustainability Officer, Dow, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Maha Eltobgy
Head of Shaping the Future of Investing; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Paula Escobar Chavarría
Editor, Magazines, Empresa Periodistica El Mercurio, Chile
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

James Etheredge
Chief Executive, North America, Accenture, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Carolyn Everson
Vice-President, Global Marketing Solutions, Facebook, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Hanneke Faber
President, Foods and Refreshment Division, Unilever, Netherlands
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Francois Faelli
Partner and Global Head, Consumer Goods Practice, Bain & Company, Belgium
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Manuel Falcó
Global Co-Head, Banking, Capital Markets and Advisory, Citi, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Martine Ferland
Chief Executive Officer, Mercer, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Susan Flanagan
President and Chief Executive Officer, GE Energy Financial Services, GE Energy, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Monica Flores
President, Latin America, ManpowerGroup, Mexico
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Becky Frankiewicz
President, North America, ManpowerGroup, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Michael Friedenberg
President, Reuters, Thomson Reuters, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

James Frost
Managing Director, Anchorage Capital Europe, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Zaur Gahramanov
Chief Executive Officer, Socar Turkey Enerji, Turkey
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Deborah Geideman
Vice-President, International Relations, Jacobs, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Michael Goltzman
Vice-President, Global Public Policy and Sustainability, The Coca-Cola Company, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Salah Goss
Head, Mastercard Labs for Financial Inclusion, Mastercard, Kenya
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Vincent Granier
Senior Adviser to the Chief Executive Officer, Total, France
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Kelly Grier
Chairman, United States; Managing Partner, Americas, EY, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Nabil Habayeb
President and Chief Executive Officer, GE MENAT, United Arab Emirates
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Tawfik Hammoud
Global Leader, Principal Investors and Private Equity Practice; Managing Director and Senior Partner, Boston Consulting Group, Canada
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Alex Harris
Head, Global Policy and Advocacy, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Dirk Carsten Hoke
Chief Executive Officer, Airbus Defence and Space, Germany
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Fernando Honorato Barbosa
Chief Economist, Banco Bradesco, Brazil
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Cindy Hook
Chief Executive Officer, Asia-Pacific, Deloitte, Singapore
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Peter Huijboom
Global Chief Executive Officer, Dentsu Media and Global Clients, Dentsu Aegis Network, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Johannes Huth
Chief Executive Officer, Middle East and North Africa, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co Partners, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Zara Ingilizian
Head of Shaping the Future of Consumption; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Lisa Ivers
Partner and Managing Director, BCG, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jim Jackson
Chief Marketing Officer, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Carol Jagio Gonzalez Aguilar
Executive Secretary, Amazon Women’s Council, OPIAC, Colombia
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Adam Kansler
President, Financial Markets, IHS Markit, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Karen Karniol-Tambour
Head, Investment Research, Bridgewater Associates, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Philippe Kavafyan
Chief Executive Officer, MHI Vestas Offshore Wind, Denmark
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Anas Kentab
Executive Vice-President, Europe Repositioning, Saudi Basic Industries (SABIC), Saudi Arabia
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Justin Kintz
Vice-President; Global Head, Public Policy, Uber Technologies, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Daniel Klier
Group General Manager; Chief of Staff, Global Banking and Markets; Global Head, Sustainable Finance, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Arvind Krishna
Senior Vice-President, Cloud and Cognitive Software, IBM, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Vishal Lall
Chief Operating Officer, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Laura Langdon
Chief Marketing Officer, Wipro, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Martina Larkin
Head of Regional Strategies, Europe and Eurasia; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Marne Levine
Vice-President, Global Partnerships, Business and Corporate Development, Facebook, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jean Lin
Global Chief Executive Officer, Isobar, People’s Republic of China
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Simon Lowden
Chief Sustainability Officer, PepsiCo, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Giulio Malegori
Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Dentsu Aegis Network, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Rebecca Marmot
Chief Sustainability Officer, Unilever, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Scott McDonald
Chief Executive Officer, Oliver Wyman Group (MMC), United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Adrian McDonald
President, Enterprise, Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), DellEMC Europe, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Hubertus Meinecke
Regional Chair, Western Europe, South America and Africa; Managing Director and Senior Partner, Boston Consulting Group, Germany
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Rajiv Memani
Chairman, India Region and Emerging Markets Committee, EY, India
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Nicola Mendelsohn
Vice-President, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Facebook, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Stephan Mergenthaler
Head of Strategic Intelligence; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Daniel Metcalfe
Global Head, Campaigns, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Bill Michael
Chair; Senior Partner, United Kingdom, KPMG, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Richard Mills
Global Head, Public and Government Affairs, UPL, Spain
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Rajeev Misra
Chief Executive Officer, Softbank Investment Advisers (Vision Fund), United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Nicholas Moakes
Chief Investment Officer, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Olivier Murguet
Deputy Chief Executive Officer; Executive Vice-President, Regions and Sales, Groupe Renault, France
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Piero Novelli
Co-President, Investment Bank, UBS, Switzerland
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jean-Marc Ollagnier
Group Chief Executive, Resources, Accenture, France
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Shahid Padinhare Kodakatt
Commercial Director, Lulu Financial Group, United Arab Emirates
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Ulf Pehrsson
Vice-President, Government and Industry Relations, Ericsson, Sweden
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Franck Petitgas
Head, International, Morgan Stanley, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Robert Prince
Co-Chief Investment Officer, Bridgewater Associates, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jay Pryor
Vice-President, Business Development, Chevron, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Gilles Rapin
Senior Vice-President, Business Development and Innovation, Kudelski Group, Switzerland
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Diane Reyes
Group General Manager, Global Liquidity and Cash Management, HSBC Holdings, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Darrell Rigby
Partner; Head, Global Innovation and Agile Practices, Bain & Company, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Alain Roumilhac
President, ManpowerGroup, France
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Laura Rudas
Executive Vice-President, Strategy, Palantir Technologies, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Hernan Saenz
Partner and Director, Bain & Company, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Thomas Saueressig
Member of the Executive Board, Product Engineering, SAP, Germany
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Frank Schulz
Global Vice-President, Government Relations, ArcelorMittal, Germany
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Nicole Schwab
Director, International Relations, National Geographic Society, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Dharmendra Kumar Sinha
President, North America, Cognizant, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Andrea B. Smith
Chief Administrative Officer, Bank of America, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Paul Smyke
Head of Regional Agenda – North America, Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Dmitry Snesar
Member of the Board, VTB Leasing and VTB Pension Fund; Global Head, Client Coverage; Senior Vice-President, VTB Bank, Russian Federation
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

John Stackhouse
Senior Vice-President, RBC (Royal Bank of Canada), Canada
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Kirstine Stewart
Head of Shaping the Future of Media, Entertainment and Culture; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Angela Strank
Chief Scientist; Head, Technology, Downstream, BP, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Magesvaran Suranjan
President, Asia, Middle East and Africa, Procter & Gamble, Singapore
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Maryrose Sylvester
Managing Director, USA; Head, US Electrification Business, ABB, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Luke Taylor
Chief Executive Officer, Omnicom Precision Marketing Group, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Onyeche Ebunuta Tifase
Chief Executive Officer, Siemens, Nigeria
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Stefano Trojani
Head of Security Affairs; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Joe Ucuzoglu
Chief Executive Officer, USA, Deloitte, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Peter Ungaro
Senior Vice-President and General Manager, High-Performance Computing and Artificial Intelligence, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Jennifer Vescio
Global Head, Business Development, Uber Technologies, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Beth Viner
Partner and Managing Director; Lead, New York Center, BCG Digital Ventures, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Andrew Walton
Group Director, Corporate Affairs, Lloyds Banking Group, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Lara J. Warner
Group Chief Risk Officer, Credit Suisse, Switzerland
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Kevin Warren
Chief Marketing Officer, UPS, USA
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Gordon Watson
Chief Executive Officer, AXA Asia, Hong Kong SAR, China
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Garance Wattez-Richard
Head, AXA Emerging Customers, AXA, France
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Philipp Wehle
Chief Executive Officer, International Wealth Management, Credit Suisse, Switzerland
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Miranda Wolpert
Head, Mental Health Priority Area, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Justin Wood
Head of Regional Agenda, Asia-Pacific; Member of the Executive Committee, World Economic Forum
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Adrian Zadeh
Chief Executive Officer, J. Safra Sarasin Asset Management, Panama
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Lucy d’Arville
Partner, Bain & Company, Australia
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Sandrine de Guio
Global Vice-President; Head, Private Office of the Chief Executive Officer, External Strategic Affairs, Schneider Electric, France
Level 4Head of Business Unit/Head of Region

Benoît Coeuré
Head of the BIS Innovation Hub, Bank for International Settlements (BIS), Switzerland
Level 4Dep Head of International Org./Reg-Func Head of Top International Org.

Gita Gopinath
Chief Economist, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Washington DC
Level 4Dep Head of International Org./Reg-Func Head of Top International Org.

Charlotte Petri Gornitzka
Deputy Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), New York
Level 4Dep Head of International Org./Reg-Func Head of Top International Org.

Jeanine Plasschaert
Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Iraq and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), New York
Level 4Dep Head of International Org./Reg-Func Head of Top International Org.

Gabriela I. Ramos Patiño
Chief of Staff and Sherpa to the G20, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Paris
Level 4Dep Head of International Org./Reg-Func Head of Top International Org.

Gerda Verburg
Assistant Secretary-General; Coordinator, Scaling Up Nutrition (SUN) Movement, United Nations, Geneva
Level 4Dep Head of International Org./Reg-Func Head of Top International Org.

Amani Abou-Zeid
Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy, African Union Commission, Addis Ababa
Level 5Regional/Functional Head of International Org.

Francesca Colombo
Head, Health Division, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Paris
Level 5Regional/Functional Head of International Org.

Nickolay Mladenov
Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, Office of the United Nations Special Coordinator (UNSCO), Jerusalem
Level 5Regional/Functional Head of International Org.

Amre Moussa
Chairman and Member of the Panel of the Wise, African Union Commission, Cairo
Level 5Regional/Functional Head of International Org.

Ruba Borno
Vice-President and General Manager, Cisco, USA
Level 5Middle Management & Advisers

Ayakha Melithafa
Recruitment Official, African Climate Alliance, South Africa
Level 5Middle Management & Advisers

Sophie Achieng Otiende
Programme Consultant, Awareness Against Human Trafficking (HAART Kenya), Kenya
Level 5Middle Management & Advisers

Yan Shuo
Global Shaper, Dalian Hub, People’s Republic of China
Level 5Middle Management & Advisers

Penny Abeywardena
Commissioner for International Affairs, Mayor’s Office, City of New York, USA
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Fahd Al-Rasheed
President, Royal Commission for Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Maryam Eid AlMheiri
Director-General, Abu Dhabi Government Office, United Arab Emirates
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Hanspeter Ambühl
President of the Davos Parliament, Gemeinde Davos, Switzerland
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Tarzisius Caviezel
Mayor of Davos, Switzerland
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Alessandro Della Vedova
President of the Parliament of Grisons, Switzerland
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Jin Guowei
Vice-Mayor of Dalian, People’s Republic of China
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Jin Xiangjun
Vice-Mayor of Tianjin, People’s Republic of China
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Mohammed Khalifa Al Mubarak
Chairman, Abu Dhabi Department of Culture and Tourism, United Arab Emirates
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Li Bo
Vice-Mayor of Chongqing, People’s Republic of China
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Sir Edward Lister
Chief Strategy Adviser to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Pierre Maudet
State Councillor, Department of Economic Development of Geneva, Switzerland
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

William Russell
Lord Mayor of the City of London, United Kingdom
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Stav Shaffir
Member of Parliament, Knesset, Israel
Level 5Local/Municipal Head

Stefan Walser
Councillor, Davos, Switzerland
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Wen Guohui
Mayor of Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
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Einas Al Eisa
Rector, Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University (PNU), Saudi Arabia
Level 6Public Sector Expert

Mohammad Ali Al Shorafa Al Hammadi
Chairman, Abu Dhabi Department of Economic Development, United Arab Emirates
Level 6Public Sector Expert

Amal Al Moallimi
General Manager, International Collaboration, Human Rights Commission, Saudi Arabia
Level 6Public Sector Expert

Ahmed Al-Khateeb
Chairman, Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, Saudi Arabia
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Nane Annan
Lawyer and Artist, Kofi Annan Foundation, Switzerland
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Carl Bildt
Co-Chair, European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR), Sweden
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Gordon Brown
United Nations Special Envoy for Global Education; Chair, International Commission on Financing Global Education Opportunity
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Prime Minister of New Zealand (1999-2008)
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Manager, Cyber Security Programme, Organization of American States (OAS), Washington DC
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Chief Investment Officer, Gabonese Sovereign Wealth Fund (FGIS), Gabon
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Al Gore
Vice-President of the United States (1993-2001); Chairman and Co-Founder, Generation Investment Management, USA
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Brian Henry Hook
United States Special Representative for Iran
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Vijay Iyer
Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer, Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA), Washington DC
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Christopher P. Liddell
Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy Coordination to the President of the United States
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Eric Parrado
Chief Economist; General Manager, Research Department, Inter-American Development Bank, Washington DC
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Geir O. Pedersen
United Nations Special Envoy for Syria
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Prime Minister of Denmark (2011-2015)
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Secretary of Economic Development of the State of São Paulo, Brazil
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Chairman of the Board, ENGIE Group, France
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Founder and Deputy Chairman of the Advisory Board, Aroundtown, Luxembourg
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Chairman, Mastercard, USA
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President, economiesuisse (Swiss Business Federation), Switzerland
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Chairman of the Board of Directors, Bank Julius Baer, Switzerland
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Caroline Anstey
Senior Adviser, Inter-American Development Bank, Washington DC
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Global Shaper, Paris Hub, France
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Co-Founder and President, Center for Policing Equity, USA
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Arlane Gordon-Bray
Global Shaper, Raleigh Hub, USA
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Founder and Director, Future of Hope Foundation, Zimbabwe
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Global Shaper, Canberra Hub, Australia
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Sho Hayashi
Global Shaper, Yokohama Hub, Japan
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Yannick Heiniger
Global Shaper, Geneva Hub, Switzerland
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Daria Kaleniuk
Executive Director, Anti-Corruption Action Centre, Ukraine
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Shira Kaplan
Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Cyverse, Switzerland
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Andrey L. Kostin
Russian Federation
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Lais Leao
Global Shaper, Curitiba Hub, Brazil
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Claudiu Leverenz
Global Shaper, Munich Hub, Germany
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Lin Jun
Global Shaper, Beijing II Hub, People’s Republic of China
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Gevorg Mantashyan
Global Shaper, Dilijan Hub, Armenia
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Nina Menghini
Strategic Assistant to Head, People and Organization Pharma, Novartis, Switzerland
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Kapil Mohabir
Founding Managing Partner, Plympton Farms, Guyana
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Ashish Mohan
Global Shaper, Halifax Hub, Canada
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Chinenye Monde-Anumihe
Global Shaper, Lagos Hub, Nigeria
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Maralmaa Munkh Achit
Global Shaper, Ulaanbaatar Hub, Mongolia
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Lukas Nelson
Singer, Songwriter, Philanthropist, n/a, USA
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Wanjuhi Njoroge
Global Shaper, Nairobi Hub, Kenya
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Harald Nusser
Head, Novartis Social Business, Germany
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Jeremy O’Brien
Chief Executive Officer, PsiQuantum, USA
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Judy Oh
Global Shaper, Atlanta Hub, USA
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Joseph Okello
Global Shaper, Kakuma Hub, Kenya
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Beatrice Valentina Ortalizio
Global Shaper, Rome Hub, Italy
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Paras Parekh
Global Shaper, Nagpur Hub, India
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Simon Pestano
Global Shaper, Caracas Hub, Venezuela
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Luis Antonio Ramirez Garcia
Global Shaper, Guadalajara Hub, Mexico
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Roula Rbeiz
Global Shaper, Abu Dhabi Hub, United Arab Emirates
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Maya Roy
Chief Executive Officer, YWCA Canada, Canada
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Victoria Rubanovich
Global Shaper, Moscow Hub, Russian Federation
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Akira Sakano
Global Shaper, Osaka Hub, Japan
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Ahmed Samara
Global Shaper, Muscat Hub, Oman
Level not specified

Robyn Seetal
Global Shaper, Calgary Hub, Canada
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Nita Shala
Global Shaper, Tirana Hub, Albania
Level not specified

Fern Shaw
President, Southern California District, UPS, USA
Level not specified

Samar Sikka
Global Shaper, Navi Mumbai Hub, India
Level not specified

Brittany Singh Williams
Global Shaper, Kingston Hub, Jamaica
Level not specified

Holly Syrett
Global Shaper, Amsterdam Hub, Netherlands
Level not specified

Bruktawit Tigabu Tadesse
Chief Executive Officer and Creative Director, Whiz Kids Workshop, Ethiopia
Level not specified

Neel Tamhane
Global Shaper, Dhaka Hub, Bangladesh
Level not specified

Shruthi Vijayakumar
Global Shaper, Auckland Hub, New Zealand
Level not specified

Naomi Wadler
Activist, USA
Level not specified

Daniel Weissert
Guest, Switzerland
Level not specified

Humzah Yazdani
Global Shaper, Islamabad Hub, Pakistan
Level not specified

Omnia Zaied
Global Shaper, Cairo Hub, Egypt
Level not specified

The Russians Hacked Our Democracy and Everyone Knows it. Anyone Who Denies it is Working for Putin to Undermine Our Military Industrial Gravy Train.

(Reposted from original March 2017

Part I — “…superb operational tradecraft”

As one of its central characteristics, the “Russian hack” narrative less a news story and more a story about the media telling a story. Gaining any understanding of it, necessarily involves reading it, as-written, first by the Washington Post whobroke the story, and subsequently in the on-line tech outlet, Vice’s Motherboard, and as told on TV cable news by CNN in the Summer of 2016. At the time of course, the whole host of corporate and foundation (in the case of NPR) sponsored outlets followed suit, running with the stories as soon as they hit, with little or no investigation, resulting in a nearly identical narrative distributed across the breadth of mainstream media.

The primary source for the Washington Post and the others in those early days was Dmitri Alperovich co-founder of the cyber-security firm CrowdStrike who was hired by the DNC to investigate the hacks. CrowdStrike’s conclusions were confirmed and added to by an otherwise competing firm, ThreatConnect, along with two other firms Fidelis and SecureWorks. Each firm published a number of technical blog posts detailing exactly how their cyber-experts assessed with a “high degree of confidence”, the server in the Democratic National Committee was hacked by threat groups working for the Russian military intelligence agency, the GRU.

Here, first I’ve drawn from some of the key articles and posts from the time, to provide short Russia hack “cliffs notes”, and provided links to the original material. In the second half, I provide some background on key players and try to show possible motivations for helping to advance the Russian hack narrative. I also pull from the exhaustive work of a number of independent experts who, like Alperovich and other key players, possess the necessary technology and forensics understanding, but who show the Russia hack story could not possibly have happened the way we are expected to believe, and in all likelihood, didn’t happen at all.

Washington Post, June 14, 2016:

Russian government hackers penetrated the computer network of the Democratic National Committee and gained access to the entire database of opposition research on GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump, according to committee officials and security experts who responded to the breach.

The intrusion into the DNC was one of several targeting American political organizations. The networks of presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were also targeted by Russian spies, as were the computers of some Republican political action committees, U.S. officials said. But details on those cases were not available.

Some of the hackers had access to the DNC network for about a year, but all were expelled over the past weekend in a major computer cleanup campaign, the committee officials and experts said.

The DNC said that no financial, donor or personal information appears to have been accessed or taken, suggesting that the breach was traditional espionage, not the work of criminal hackers.

The intrusions are an example of Russia’s interest in the U.S. political system and its desire to understand the policies, strengths and weaknesses of a potential future president — much as American spies gather similar information on foreign candidates and leaders.

It’s the job of every foreign intelligence service to collect intelligence against their adversaries, said Shawn Henry, president of CrowdStrike, the cyber firm called in to handle the DNC breach and a former head of the FBI’s cyber division.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has spoken favorably about Trump, who has called for better relations with Russia and expressed skepticism about NATO. But unlike Clinton, whom the Russians probably have long had in their spy sights, Trump has not been a politician for very long, so foreign agencies are playing catch-up, analysts say.

Other analysts noted that any dirt dug up in opposition research is likely to be made public anyway.

A spokeswoman for the Trump campaign referred questions to the Secret Service.

“DNC leaders were tipped to the hack in late April.”, according to DNC Chief executive Amy Dacey.

Also according to Dacey, “That evening, she spoke with Michael Sussmann, a DNC lawyer [and] former federal prosecutor who handled computer crime cases, called Henry, whom he has known for many years….

[Within 24 hours, CrowdStrike] identified two separate hacker groups, both working for the Russian government, …said Dmitri Alperovitch, CrowdStrike co-founder… The firm had analyzed other breaches by both groups over the past two years.

One group, which CrowdStrike had dubbed Cozy Bear [aka Advanced Persistent Threat-APT 29], had gained access last summer and was monitoring the DNC’s email and chat communications…

The other, which the firm had named Fancy Bear [aka APT 28], broke into the network in late April and targeted the opposition research files…. The hackers stole two files, Henry said. And they had access to the computers of the entire research staff…

The computers contained research going back years on Trump. “It’s a huge job” to dig into the dealings of somebody who has never run for office before, Dacey said.”

Alperovitch commented, that the two alleged hackers have, “superb operational tradecraft”.

Guccifer 2.0 meets ‘Pwn All The Things’:

The next day, on June 15th, the blog of “Guccifer 2.0” persona made his debut posting a number of DNC documents and declaring:

Worldwide known cyber security company CrowdStrike announced that the Democratic National Committee (DNC) servers had been hacked by “sophisticated” hacker groups.

I’m very pleased the company appreciated my skills so highly))) But in fact, it was easy, very easy.

Guccifer [Marcel Lazăr Lehel] may have been the first one who penetrated Hillary Clinton’s and other Democrats’ mail servers. But he certainly wasn’t the last. No wonder any other hacker could easily get access to the DNC’s servers.

Shame on CrowdStrike: Do you think I’ve been in the DNC’s networks for almost a year and saved only 2 documents? Do you really believe it?

Also…

DNC chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said no financial documents were compromised. Nonsense! Just look through the Democratic Party lists of donors!

And…

The main part of the papers, thousands of files and mails, I gave to Wikileaks. They will publish them soon. (emphasis mine)

Matt Tait, is a cyber intelligence expert formerly with British GCHQ, Google Project Zero, and currently a senior fellow at the Robert Strauss Center at the University of Texas, Austin. Posting on Twitter as, Pwn All The Things ,Tait revealed metadata in some of the Word documents posted by G2, showing they were last modified by: Феликс Эдмундович — “Felix Edmundovich”.

In the early 1920’s, Felix Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky was the first head of the Cheka, the early USSR national police. One document in the same G2 post was an opposition research piece on Trump containing broken link error messages in Russian.

G2 also directly contacted writers at The Smoking Gun, and Gawker. He gave TSG access to password protected DNC documents on a recently launched website, DCLeaks, posting various documents relating to the Clintons, The RNC, George Soros, NATO commander General Philip Breedlove, and others.

Guccifer 2.0 claimed to be Romanian but as shown by Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai, writing for Motherboard on June 16th, had difficulty speaking the language. In, addition Franceschi-Bicchierai makes the following assessment, “considering a long trail of breadcrumbs pointing back to Russia left by the hacker, as well as other circumstantial evidence, it appears … likely that Guccifer 2.0 is nothing but…,” as the title of the article states, “a disinformation campaign by Russian spies.”

Franceschi-Bicchierai further writes:

The main element pointing to Russia is the timeline of the events. For a year, hackers with ties to the Russian government — likely the FSB and the military GRU — were inside the servers of the DNC… Then, [when the DNC] called in CrowdStrike, the hackers got kicked out. This led to the operation being exposed in the media.

That’s when the Russian intelligence services likely decided they needed to come up with a cover hacker identity to claim credit and shift blame away from themselves. Guccifer 2.0 had no online history until yesterday [June 15, 2016] …

In a phone interview with Thomas Rid, professor of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, Rid tells Franceschi-Bicchierai, “…this [is a] pretty sophisticated false flag operation…, It’s too smooth for one hacker”. In his own article for Motherboard on July 24th, Rid assesses G2 to be a Russian military operation designed to draw attention away from Russian intelligence and make the DNC hack look like the work of a lone hacktivist.

In the same article Rid elaborates on evidence pointing to the hack itself:

One of the strongest pieces of evidence linking GRU to the DNC hack is the equivalent of identical fingerprints found in two burglarized buildings: a reused command-and-control address — 176.31.112[.]10 — that was hard coded in a piece of malware found both in the German parliament as well as on the DNC’s servers. Russian military intelligence was identified by the German domestic security agency BfV as the actor responsible for the Bundestag breach. The infrastructure behind the fake MIS Department domain was also linked to the Berlin intrusion through at least one other element, a shared SSL certificate.

Rid also elaborates on what he calls the “larger operation” but essentially referring to Guccifer 2.0:

The larger operation, with its manipulative traits, fits well into the wider framework of Russia’s evolving military doctrine, known as New Generation Warfare or the “Gerasimov Doctrine,” …. This new mindset drastically expands what qualifies as…military [targets, and tactics]. Deception and disinformation are part and parcel of this new approach, as are “camouflage and concealment,” as the Israeli analyst Dima Adamsky pointed out in [a study of Russia’s strategic] art published in November last year.

The Cybersecurity Firms

CrowdStrike: Also on June 15th, additional technical details on the incident was provided by Dmitri Alperovitch on CrowdStrike’s blog. The post read:

CrowdStrike stands fully by its analysis and findings identifying two separate Russian intelligence-affiliated adversaries present in the DNC network in May 2016.

CrowdStrike Services, Inc.…was called by [the DNC] to respond to a suspected breach. We deployed our IR team and technology and immediately identified two sophisticated adversaries on the network — COZY BEAR and FANCY BEAR. We’ve had lots of experience with both of these actors attempting to target our customers in the past and know them well. In fact, our team considers them some of the best adversaries out of all the numerous nation-state, criminal and hacktivist/terrorist groups we encounter on a daily basis. Their tradecraft is superb, operational security second to none…

COZY BEAR’s [APT 29] preferred intrusion method is a broadly targeted spearphish campaign that typically includes web links to a malicious dropper. Once executed on the machine, the code will deliver one of a number of sophisticated Remote Access Tools (RATs)…

FANCY BEAR [APT 28] adversary used different tradecraft, deploying X-Agent malware with capabilities to do remote command execution, file transmission and keylogging…

CrowdStrike was the only cybersecurity firm to have direct access to the DNC servers, but several other firms made assessments based on CrowdStrike’s work and other sources.

SecureWorks: In a June 16, 2016 blog post, cybersecurity firm, SecureWorks reported a spearphishing campaign, allegedly conducted by TG-4127 (SecureWorks designation for Fancy Bear/APT 28) using bit.ly short links and a fake Google login page targeting 3,907 Gmail accounts. According to SecureWorks, the targets included individuals in Russia and former Soviet states, U.S. and European military and government personnel, individual in the defense and government supply chain, as well DNC and Hillary Clinton staff in March and April of 2016. The post reported that among the Clinton staff allegedly targeted, was campaign chairman, John Podesta whose 46,500 e-mails were also published the following month by WikiLeaks.

Fidelis: From the same Fidelis June 20, 2016 blog post referenced in Rid’s article above, the following is quoted as further confirmation of CrowdStrike’s findings:

We performed an independent review of the malware and other data… in order to validate and provide our perspective on the reporting done by CrowdStrike…. As part of our investigation, we analyzed the same malware files that were used in the DNC incident….we agree with CrowdStrike and believe that the COZY BEAR and FANCY BEAR APT groups were involved in successful intrusions at the DNC….

FireEye: This firm also received malware samples from CrowdStrike for analysis, and on June 20, the Washington Post reported:

[FireEye] Based its analysis on five DNC malware samples. In a statement to The Washington Post, Mandiant [FireEye] researcher Marshall Heilman said that the malware and associated servers are consistent with those previously used by “APT 28 and APT 29,’’ which are Mandiant’s [FireEye] names for Fancy Bear and Cozy Bear, respectively.

ThreatConnect: Based on CrowdStrike’s assessment and their own research analyzing Guccifer 2.0’s correspondence with journalists, cyber security firm ThreatConnect published a number of blog posts regarding G2 including apparent connections to DCLeaks. ThreatConnect also reports possible connections between DCLeaks and hackers. Based on evidence gathered, ThreatConnect made its assessment of G2 :

ThreatConnect is the first to identify and detail analysis of Guccifer 2.0’s operational infrastructure…As more details continue to surface surrounding Guccifer 2.0, we continue to identify heavy traces of Russian activity, from the specific Russian-based VPN service provider, domain registrants, and registrars as well as various discrete events that have circumstantial marks of Russian origins.

… we conclude Guccifer 2.0 is an apparition created under a hasty Russian D&D [denial & deception] campaign, which has clearly evolved into an Active Measures Campaign. Those who are operating under the Guccifer 2.0 [persona] are likely made up a cadre of non-technical politruk….

…Our research into Guccifer 2.0’s infrastructure further solidifies our assessment that the persona is a Russia-controlled platform that can act as a censored hacktivist. Moscow determines what Guccifer 2.0 shares and thus can attempt to selectively impact media coverage, and potentially the election, in a way that ultimately benefits their national objectives.

I’ve attempted to provide a basic outline the June 2016, major news events reported on the DNC Russian hack story. Add to this the WikiLeaks releases of the DNC and Podesta e-mails, plus a surprise victory by Trump with reports of Russian directed fake news on social media, and you might have a pretty good understanding of just how the Russian government attempted to interfere with the U.S. election at the very least, and at worst, how Vladimir Putin managed to installed his very own Manchurian Candidate into the White House. Except for just one thing…

Everything you just read is a fraud.

“Everything” is an extreme claim. “Everything” includes undisputed facts like Matt Tait being the first to point out the the Cyrillic in the G2 metadata. On the other hand, fraud, of all words best describes the Russian hack narrative, and thanks to the work of a few dedicated investigators, the assertion is not difficult to defend.

As a crypto-mathematician, William Binney’s 36 years’ experience in signals intelligence began in the U.S. Army during the 1960’s when he developed his own techniques for analyzing intercepted metadata (data about the data) to accurately predict Russian and Israeli military activity. Later at NSA, as an expert on the Russian military, he became Technical Director of the “World Geopolitical and Military Analysis and Reporting Shop”, an NSA signals intelligence group consisting of 6,000 individuals. During his tenure, in addition to his management role, he was responsible, with a small team, for having developed the basic systems behind today’s massive NSA metadata collection programs as exposed, for example, by Edward Snowden. However, Binney became a whistleblower himself over a decade before Snowden when it was discovered, NSA was using pieces of his team’s system, “ThinThread”, (absent algorithms built-in to exclude innocent individuals) to collect data on every US citizen. Furthermore, ThinThread, was fully operational in 2001 but NSA failed to use it as designed, and failed to give warning of 9/11 as it was soon demonstrated it could have. More recently Binney is an individual who in many ways can provide unique prospective on the DNC server incident as compared to assertions made by intelligence agencies, government contracted cyber security firms, and corporate media.

In a January 2017 podcast interview with Scott Horton, just having co-authored an article with Ray McGovern, (himself a 27-year veteran of the CIA and whistleblower) for Consortium News entitled, The Dubious Case on Russian ‘Hacking’, Bill Binney had this to say:

If you’re going to accuse them of interfering in our election then the only way they’d be doing it would be to leak the [DNC and John Podesta] e-mails to WikiLeaks, to get published so they can be in public view. I mean, otherwise everybody hacks everybody. In fact, we the United States do better at hacking everybody on the planet than anybody else in the world! …The Russians…aren’t doing anywhere near the hacking that we do.… They certainly do hack, but that’s not the issue here…. To me, the issue still, is the intelligence community prove that actually, they did transfer those e-mails to WikiLeaks. I’ve yet to see any proof of that.

And, as diplomatic and military tensions continually increase between NATO countries and Russia, Binney provides some poignant reasons why we should care:

…[T]he point is, we don’t want this to be another WMD [Weapons of Mass Destruction, the pretense for the 2nd Iraq war]or another Tonkin Gulf affair where you can make a decision to go to cold war, even start a hot war where a lot of people… [are] killed, like in Vietnam where the whole basis of the Tonkin Gulf was a farce, was a fabricated set of evidence to go to war and so is the Weapons of Mass Destruction, and people died because of these decisions…So, …let us have a little professional discipline here and show the evidence and trace, and make sure that what we’re saying is right.(emphasis mine)

Now, before exploring the details of why the Russia hack is a fraud, there are two overarching factors that inform everything about the entire claim:

One.

There is no evidence.…

Scott Horton: …the way they make their assertions, does it make you really doubt that they have the evidence to back it up…?

William Binney:…you see, if you have the evidence, you have the evidence. You don’t need to say , “we have high confidence”…stating a level of confidence means you don’t have the evidence.

SH: “…I believe that you had written, if it happened the way that they [the cybersecurity firms and intelligence agencies] say it happened, they [the NSA] would be able to prove it.[In other words,] you can’t run around on the world’s Internet without the NSA following your every step or at least, they can always go back and rewind the tape and see everything everybody did if that’s what they want to do. Is that right? ”

WB: That’s correct, yeah.

SH: Even the Russians, sir…the Russians?

WB: Yes, anyone, anybody on the planet! They’ve got tens of thousands of implants in all the switches in the worldwide network. Anybody that does anything in the world [involving electronic communication], they’ve got evidence of it.

And two.

There is no evidence…

Then FBI Director, James Comey, literally shrugging in response to the question from Sen. Richard Burr(R), “Do you know why you were denied access to those servers?” Equally striking, Comey’s answer, “I don’t know…” was evidently acceptable to Burr, the committee, and the media.

The DNC server has been sequestered under the safe custody of CrowdStrike, apparently ever since June 14, 2016. The FBI, has never once had access to it. Nobody is even able to verify the server has not since been destroyed.

On January 4, 2017 BuzzFeed News quoted Eric Walker, DNC deputy communications director, in an e-mail to BuzzFeed wrote, “the FBI never requested access to the DNC’s computer servers”. This is an interesting claim in light of another statement just six days later. On January 10, James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee that, after “multiple requests at different levels”of the FBI to the DNC, it was “agreed” the FBI would not be granted access to the DNC serversbut simply accept the forensic material provided by CrowdStrike. When asked why the FBI was denied access, Comey replied, “I don’t know for sure”andtestified to it with a shrug. At this point committee chairman Sen. Richard Burr, (R), N. Carolina moved on to other questions and none of the other committee members ever asked Comey how this “agreement” could possibly be appropriate under the circumstances. But at any rate, Comey confirmed, all discoveries from the server were made and reported by CrowdStrike, and verified by no one.

If there is no evidence of a Russian government hack, what is there?

There are several analysts who have, to a great extent done the job the intelligence agencies have not. They are Adam Carter (a pseudonym) and, the Forensicator (I’m pretty sure his parents didn’t name him that either). Adam Carter has taken a broad approach, analyzing any computer and non-computer evidence and publishing it on his blog, g-2.space. The Forensicator has concentrated in-depth on two [as of this writing] Guccifer 2.0 releases, both of them zip archives published on September 13, 2016 and October 4, 2016 respectively. Two more analysts with significant contributions are Jeffrey Carr and Skip Folden. Jeffrey Carr is author of Inside Cyber Warfare: Mapping the Cyber Underworld and lecturer on cybersecurity at the Defense Intelligence Agency, U.S. Army War College, and NATO. Skip Folden was an IBM Program Manager for 25 years, now an independent analyst and along with Bill Binney, a member of Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS). VIPS is a group primarily of former CIA, FBI, and NSA officers who, have written 50 formal memos to U.S. Presidents, George W. Bush, Obama, and Trump on significant intelligence related matters, the first of which was submitted on February 5, 2003. (This was the day of Colin Powell’s infamous speech to the UN presenting false evidence to justify the 2nd Iraq War)

On July 24, 2017, VIPS members penned a memo, written to President Trump and published on Consortiumnews.com, attempting to inform him of forensic evidence countering the Russian hack narrative, using among others the work of Adam Carter and The Forensicator.

The mainstream media takes a lot of heat for quoting, (some have accused them of creating) “anonymous sources” and reporting the quotes as statements of fact. VIPS, after criticizing the use of anonymous sources on other occasions has also taken heat for citing Adam Carter and Forensicator. I’m citing them as well. However, I don’t believe the question, “Is it okay to cite anonymous sources?” is answerable without further context.

A pattern one can often spot, is a headline and intro directing a reader toward a particular narrative. Then comes some background and other statements of fact. Then, if the factual portion doesn’t directly support the intended narrative we often find the familiar, “but anonymous sources say….” Lo and behold, the anonymous source’s statements fit the narrative exactly and are impossible for the reader to verify one way or the other.

In contrast, Forensicator shows all the work required to reach his conclusions and provides the links to the two 7zip files, one of which is on G2’s blog. One of the files is password protected but the password is [GuCCif3r_2.0].

Likewise, Adam Carter provides links to all of his sources and explains the logical steps he makes to reach his conclusions. Anyone is welcome to examine the evidence and reach their own conclusion. In other words, it is possible for a reader to verify, reinterpret, or disprove.

Adam Carter

“Guccifer 2.0: Game Over”

The initial Adam Carter post, shows document metadata in DNC documents published by Guccifer 2.0. These are the same documents in G2’s first post created by ‘Warren Flood’ on June 15, 2016. The metadata show they were created at 1:38 PM and modified by ‘Феликс Эдмундович’ 30 minutes later at 2:08, Eastern Daylight Time. (In Matt Tait’s Twitter post above, those dates and times are absent.) This is particularly interesting since AC points out, according to G2 in his conversation with Vice’s Motherboard, he was kicked out of the DNC server on June 12. Adam Carter reports Warren Flood is a real person with DNC connections but not at all likely involved in the operation. According to AC’s research, Mr. Flood, “has worked for Obama for America, the DNC, [and] served as Joe Biden’s technical director” but also, according to his Linked In profile he has not worked in any such capacity since 2011. So, it is easy to imagine, for example Guccifer 2.0 creating new copies of DNC documents with Warren Flood’s old laptop that had been sitting in a DNC closet somewhere since Warren turned it in, in 2011. We can’t prove it but if true, we must conclude the DNC wasn’t hacked by Russian spooks at all, but infiltrated! …very deeply indeed.

Adam Carter clearly points out the absurdity of the notion that Guccifer 2.0 is a Russian psy-op by simply laying out the facts and exposing them to basic logic. In fact, the more I learn, the more a common theme running throughout the entire narrative continues to emerge. That is the seeming expectation that we believe in the absurd, almost as if members of a cult. Taking part of Adam’s post as a framework, I think the following brings the level of sheer nonsense we are expected to accept without question into sharp focus:

Let’s pretend you are a Russian spy named Guccifer 2.0. Remember, G2 is a “disinformation campaign by Russian spies”, so you want people to think you’re not Russian, not Russian, got it? Your goal is to run a “… pretty sophisticated false flag operation” because when you’re all done you want Tom Rid to say you are way “too smooth” to be “one hacker”. Here are a few suggestions about how to do it. Go!

Name your computer account Феликс Эдмундович.

Create/open and save documents so Феликс Эдмундович shows up in the metadata.

Use a Russian VPN service (available for use anywhere in the world) to cloak your IP address.

Use public web-based email services that uncloak and forward your Russian IP address.

Now, use those email services to contact various media outlets on the same day and tell everybody you’re Romanian!

Huh? Guccifer 2.0 was not trying to hide his “Russian” identity. He wanted everyone to believe he was Russian while denying it at the same time. To borrow a phrase, it’s “totally illogical”. And yet, very smart, experienced cybersecurity and intelligence professionals have looked at this very same evidence and determined G2 was a Russian spy, declared him, “sophisticated”, and better yetan example of, “camouflage and concealment.” Why would they do that? Did Thomas Rid rise to his status at Johns Hopkins and Kings College by sacrificing his credibility randomly? It doesn’t seem likely. To make it worth his while, he would need to whore it out to someone who wanted to purchase some credibility for a notion that had none. How often does this wind up being the true role of “the expert” when it comes to high stakes political theater? More on that later.

Getting back to the absurd, let’s not forget the previously mentioned “Gerasimov Doctrine including the never-before seen in warfare, “deception and disinformation” and “camouflage and concealment”. Never mind Guccifer 2.0 as presented, is a lousy example, are these new, diabolical Russian inventions? Anybody ever watch the History Channel? The doctrine may be real and might well be formidable but I’ve learned nothing about it by reading Rid. Could it be because his mission is “deception and disinformation?” Thomas Rid was right about one thing, however. Guccifer 2.0 was a false flag.

As if all that weren’t enough, as Adam Carter closely examines G2’s language patterns, he writes:

Several experts and their assessments have been cited, Motherboard (Vice) reference 3 such experts but only one appeared willing to be identified. — Carrying out our own analysis (and highlighting the process), we can see why the others may have chosen anonymity — their assessments seem to be limited and pick up on things that in aggregate, Guccifer [2.0] rarely actually does.

Guccifer 2.0 used a “Russian smiley” (“)))”) ONCE! — This was in one of his first posts. The other thing that made him appear Russian was that he referred to hacks as “deals” a couple of times. — HOWEVER, he ONLY does this in the interview with Motherboard/Vice on the 21st of June — he never repeats this behavior in any other communications — so, it seems it was just put on for the purpose of the interview. — These are the main 2 things pointed out by the anonymous experts and are bizarrely both things he does only in 2 isolated incidents.

AC gives his own examples of G2’s language usage and references several sources in order to show G2 doesn’t speak English in a way one would expect from a native Russian.

For our own non-expert analysis, details about differences between Russian/Slavonic Languages & English language can be found herehere and here.

As a brief example, [The Smoking Gun] article’s quoted statements from Guccifer [2] are below. Definite and indefinite article use and prepositions are [in bold]:

AC quotes G2:

“I stand against Guccifer’s conviction and extradition. I will continue Guccifer’s business and will fight all those illuminati the way I can. They should set him free!!!!”

“Hi. This is Guccifer 2.0 and this is me who hacked Democratic National Committee.”

“Guccifer may have been the first one who penetrated Hillary Clinton’s and other Democrats’ mail servers. But he certainly wasn’t the last. No wonder any other hacker could easily get access to the DNC’s servers.”

“First I breached into mail boxes of a number of Democrats. And then using the info collected I got into Committee servers.”

AC continues:

…he habitually uses definite articles, even when communicating in a live chat with Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai of Vice’s Motherboard, he rarely fails to include them. — The amount of instances where his definite and indefinite articles are correctly used (when they are used) is around 96%. — In other words, while he mangles English language selectively, he doesn’t do it in a way that is consistent or in the way that is expected from those whose native language is one lacking definite and indefinite articles (such as is true with Russian language).

The Forensicator

Forensicator provides extensive analyses of two 7zip archive files released by Guccifer 2.0 on September 13, 2016, the other on October 4, both containing DNC documents allegedly hacked on July 5, 2016.

He refers to the two files as, “NGP/VAN” and “CF.” Forensicator goes into excruciating detail analyzing the metadata in the two 7zip files demonstrating that the July 5 event was not a remote hack at all but a copy, likely made to a USB thumb drive somewhere in the eastern time-zone. Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity (VIPS) provide their own interpretation of Forensicator’s work in a memo to President Trump, published in Consortium News on July 24, 2017:

July 5, 2016: In the early evening, Eastern Daylight Time, someone working in the EDT time zone with a computer directly connected to the DNC server or DNC Local Area Network, copied 1,976 MegaBytes of data in 87 seconds onto an external storage device. That speed is much faster than what is physically possible with a hack.

It thus appears that the purported “hack” of the DNC by Guccifer 2.0 (the self-proclaimed WikiLeaks source) was not a hack by Russia or anyone else, but was rather a copy of DNC data onto an external storage device.

Again, the above is the VIPS interpretation. Forensicator did not claim evidence of a computer in the Eastern time zone, “directly connected to the DNC server or DNC Local area network.” Nor did he make any mention of a “hack.” Since VIPS did not make it abundantly clear they were interpreting and not reporting on Forensicator’s work, Forensicator quite rightly published his Corrections and Clarifications blog entry, soon thereafter.

Even if the NGP/VAN analysis doesn’t directly support every assertion made by VIPS, it is all but impossible to square Forensicator’s conclusions with the “Russia hack” story. Below he explains the two conclusions that received VIPS’s attention in greater detail:

Conclusion 6: The initial DNC file collection activity began at approximately 2016–07–05 18:39:02 EDT and ended at 2016–07–05 18:53:17 EDT. This conclusion is supported by the observed last modified times and the earlier conclusion that the ex-filtrated files were copied to a computer located in the Eastern Time zone.

Conclusion 7. A transfer rate of 23 MB/s is estimated for this initial file collection operation. This transfer rate can be achieved when files are copied over a LAN or when copying directly from the host computer’s hard drive. This rate is too fast to support the hypothesis that the DNC data was initially copied over the Internet (esp. to Romania).

This transfer rate (23 MB/s) is typically seen when copying local data to a fairly slow (USB-2) thumb drive.

To get a sense of where this 23MB/s (23 Mega Bytes per Second) rate falls in the range of supported speeds for various network and media storage technologies, consult the blog entry titled The Need for Speed. That blog entry describes test results which support the conclusions and observations noted above…

On August 9, Patrick Lawrence, writing about the VIPS memo for the left-leaning, The Nation, published, A New Report Raises Big Questions About Last Year’s DNC Hack.

The article enraged members of the technocracy aligned to legitimize the Russian hack fraud and, as should be expected, hit pieces were being rolled out the following day. Notables came from New York Magazine, The Washington Post (surprise), The Hill, and on Twitter, Mr. Matt “Pwn All The Things” Tait himself. In the following days, Adam Carter published three blog updates in which he links to each of the hit pieces. He answers each criticism of his own work and Forensicator’s, line by line, and calls out the familiar logical fallacy techniques required to make each hit piece, and pieces like these, work. AC’s posts are linked [here][here], and [here]. Anyone unfamiliar with the term, “hit (smear) piece” is probably familiar with the genre without knowing it since they masquerade as journalism in popular media with great frequency. I would strongly urge anyone with an inkling of suspicion as to the workings of mainstream media to read these posts.

Jeffrey Carr

In a Medium.com blog post from July 2016, Jeffrey Carr points out the credibility problems in the X-Agent malware attribution work of CrowdStrike, ThreatConnect, and Thomas Rid. He doesn’t seek to disprove Russian intelligence origin, instead he demonstrates the same cannot be attributed to Russian intelligence with any reasonable accuracy. Much of Carr’s criticism pertains to Thomas Rid’s reference to expert analysis of the Bundestag (German Parliament) cyber breach in May of 2015, and the forensic similarities with CrowdStrike supplied evidence on the DNC incident. (all emphasis below is mine)

Problem #1: The IP address 176.31.112[.]10 used in the Bundestag breach as a Command and Control server has never been connected to the Russian intelligence services. In fact, Claudio Guarnieri, a highly regarded security researcher, whose technical analysis was referenced by Rid, stated that “no evidence allows to tie the attacks to governments of any particular country.”

Problem #2: The Command & Control server (176.31.112.10) was using an outdated version of OpenSSL vulnerable to Heartbleed attacks. Heartbleed allows attackers to exfiltrate data including private keys, usernames, passwords and other sensitive information.

The existence of a known security vulnerability that’s trivial to exploit opens the door to the possibility that the systems in question were used by one rogue group, and then infiltrated by a second rogue group, making the attribution process even more complicated. At the very least, the C2 server should be considered a compromised indicator.

Problem #3: The BfV published a newsletter in January 2016 which assumes that the GRU and FSB are responsible because of technical indicators, not because of any classified finding; to wit:

“Many of these attack campaigns have each other on technical similarities, such as malicious software families, and infrastructure — these are important indicators of the same authorship. It is assumed that both the Russian domestic intelligence service FSB and the military foreign intelligence service GRU run cyber operations.”

Professor Rid’s argument depended heavily on conveying hard attribution by the BfV even though the President of the BfV didn’t disguise the fact that their attribution was based on an assumption and not hard evidence.

Personally, I don’t want to have my government create more tension in Russian-U.S. relations because the head of Germany’s BfV made an assumption.

And…

While it’s natural to think of Sofacy [Fancy Bear, APT 28] as a group of individuals, it’s more like a group of technical indicators which include tools, techniques, procedures, target choices, countries of origin, and of course, people. Since most bad actors operate covertly, we are highly dependent on the forensics. Since many of the tools used are shared, and other indicators easily subverted, the forensics can be unreliable….

That, plus the occasional cross-over between independent Russian hackers and Russia’s security services makes differentiation between a State and non-State threat actor almost impossible. For that reason alone, it should be incumbent upon policymakers and journalists to question their sources about how they ‘know’ that the individuals involved are part of a State-run operation.

Quoting from the New York Times, July 21, 2016:

Donald J. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, discussed his views on foreign policy … with David E. Sanger and Maggie Haberman of The New York Times during the Republican National Convention…

SANGER: In our conversation a few months ago, you were discussing pulling back from commitments we can no longer afford unless others pay for them. You were discussing a set of alliances that you were happy to participate in.

TRUMP: And I think, by the way, David, I think they will be able to afford them.

SANGER: They may be.

TRUMP: We can’t.

SANGER: But I guess the question is, If we can’t, do you think that your presidency, let’s assume for a moment that they contribute what they are contributing today, or what they have contributed historically, your presidency would be one of pulling back and saying, “You know, we’re not going to invest in these alliances with NATO, we are not going to invest as much as we have in Asia since the end of the Korean War because we can’t afford it and it’s really not in our interest to do so.” (emphasis mine)

TRUMP: If we cannot be properly reimbursed for the tremendous cost of our military protecting other countries, and in many cases the countries I’m talking about are extremely rich. Then if we cannot make a deal, which I believe we will be able to, and which I would prefer being able to, but if we cannot make a deal, I would like you to say, I would prefer being able to, some people, the one thing they took out of your last story, you know, some people, the fools and the haters, they said, “Oh, Trump doesn’t want to protect you.” I would prefer that we be able to continue, but if we are not going to be reasonably reimbursed for the tremendous cost of protecting these massive nations with tremendous wealth — you have the tape going on?

HABERMAN: You had meetings in the last couple months with James Baker and Henry Kissinger. Did they in any way change your views?

TRUMP: No.

HABERMAN: And what did you come away with from those meetings?

TRUMP: No. I came away with a lot of knowledge. I respect both men. …

… TRUMP: Oh, I would love to have a good relationship where Russia and I, instead of, and us, and the U.S., instead of fighting each other we got along. It would be wonderful if we had good relationships with Russia so that we don’t have to go through all of the drama.

TRUMP: I think Putin and I will get along very well.

Trump had been expressing these kinds of sentiments since he began campaigning, and even before. He had also talked about saving money by the U.S. reducing its role as defense force for Japan and South Korea. But as soon as Trump became President, his administration became dominated by U.S. generals and for 2019, the President signed a Congressional defense budget of $700 Billion after asking for a mere 680. Talk of pulling out of NATO or shrinking the U.S. Pacific presence became a murky competition between neocon hawks, lord knows whatever is in Trump’s head, and seemingly, whatever he last heard from whom. But from a strictly Summer of 2016 perspective, let’s take another look at those “independent”, and “competing” cybersecurity firms and what impact downscaling U.S. Pacific intervention and calling off Cold War II might have on their shareholders’ bottom lines.

CrowdStrike:

According to Dmitri Alperovich’s linked bio, he is a member of the Atlantic Council. To be exact, he is a “nonresident senior fellow in the Cyber Statecraft Initiative of the Atlantic Council’s Brent Scowcroft Center.” The Atlantic Council is a Washington think tank taking significant funding from NATO, a number of high tech Pentagon weapons contractors, even a major media outlet, Thomson Reuters. Not surprisingly, in order to help its donors get their money’s worth, the Atlantic Council is a major promoter of the latest cold war with Russia. It is also worth noting, the Atlantic Council receives substantial funding from Victor Pinchuk, a former Ukrainian MP who has made gifts to the Clinton foundation of between $10 million and $25 million and met with State Department officials several times while Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State.

The president of CrowdStrike, Shawn Henry is the former executive assistant director of the FBI, appointed in 2010 by then FBI director, Robert Mueller III, yes that Robert Mueller. The linked article on Mr. Mueller is only one example of mainstream media fawning over his, “unblemished reputation”, but not everyone agrees his reputation is all that unblemished. Linked are two articles from Consortium News, one detailing Mueller’s role in torture of detainees rounded up for immigration violations after 9/11, and one regarding Mueller’s appointment as Special Council by former FBI special agent and legal counsel, Colleen Rowley. In her article, “Russiagate’s Mythical Heroes”, Rowley summarizes a number of Mueller’s typical FBI involvements that have gone mis/or unreported recently in mainstream media and sums up her article regarding Mueller’s appointment as Special Counsel with, “Mueller didn’t speak the truth about a war [2nd Iraq] he knew to be unjustified. He didn’t speak out against torture. He didn’t speak out against unconstitutional surveillance. And he didn’t tell the truth about 9/11. He is just “their man.”

Given Shawn Henry’s connections, it shouldn’t be surprising the FBI awarded CrowdStrike a $150,000 no-bid contract for “systems analysis” in 2015.

In other words, Alperovich and Henry were not random independent experts, but rather well-qualified mouthpieces appearing right when the DNC and “U.S. officials” needed them most, and highly motivated to ‘play ball.’ As a matter of fact, mostly owing to the “Revolving Door”, elite, insider status is something all the cybersecurity firms who reported on the DNC network have in common.

SecureWorks:

SecureWorks is wholly owned by Dell Technologies. Besides contributing $110,998to the Clinton campaign (and $13,299 to Trump!). It’s not an unusual practice for big donors to treat candidates like horses with odds.

Dell is a corporate member of the Council on Foreign Relations. CFR is a much older and more prestigious think tank than the Atlantic Council but very similar in its promotion of modern cold war propaganda in support of its NATO weapons suppling benefactors. Since 2007 Dell has entered into 29,431 contracts with the U.S. Department of Defense worth a total of nearly $4 Billion. For obvious reasons Dell, and SecureWorks by extension, ought to be in favor of a powerful and free spending NATO, and not happy at all with any anti-NATO rhetoric by Trump.

Fidelis:

Fidelis is previouslyowned by General Dynamics,the fifth largest U.S. weapons manufacturer, from 2012 to 2015. It is currently owned by Marlin Equity Partners a firm that doesn’t seem to have direct connections to the weapons industry, so military industrial war machine influence no longer comes from its ownership but it very much does from its patrons. The Fidelis customer list still includesHalliburton, Airbus, Thermo Fisher Scientific, United Technologies, the U.S. Air Force, and NATO.

FireEye:

Like Alperovich, FireEye is a corporate member of the Atlantic Council. CEO, Kevin Mandia has spent his entire career performing cyber intelligence either directly within the DoD, or as a contractor for the same as well as other Federal agencies. Mandia joined FireEye as Chief Operating Officer in December 2013, when FireEye acquired Mandiant, the company he founded in 2004. In his early career, Mandia served as a computer security officer in the USAF 7th Communications Group in the Pentagon, and special agent in the Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI). Later he was Director of Computer Forensics at Foundstone from 2000 to 2003, and the Director of Information Security for Sytex (later acquired by Lockheed Martin) from 1998 to 2000.

ThreatConnect:

ThreatConnect was Founded by Adam Vincent and Leigh Reichel in 2011, with their stated goal being, “to close the gap between compromise and detection for immediate response or even better, to get ahead of their attacks” and, “to shift the paradigm and address cybersecurity’s lack of automation, analytical tools, and actionable insights”. In December of 2015, quoting ThreatConnect’s own press release, the company, “closed Series B Funding at more than $16 Million. SAP National Security Services, Inc.® (SAP NS2®), subsidiary of the leading global enterprise software company SAP, led the round.”

As a result, ThreatConnect is able to run its software on the SAP NS2, SAP-HANA platform presumably in the area of defensive cybersecurity with the hope of offering the above type of apparent proactivity to their customers. Good for them.

However, the SAP-HANA platform has broader areas of application. Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the colossal dragnet of phone meta-data, email, texts, search histories, etc. operated by NSA and British GCHQ. Also, a powerful criticism of programs like Trailblazer and PRISM, leveled by NSA whistleblower William Binney , has been that they flood data analysts with such massive amounts of data that no enforcement agency relying on human agents can use the data to take action on a timely basis. In the earlier days of these types of programs the information collected could only be used retroactively. SAP-HANA is designed to address exactly this problem. Regarding the platform’s application in mass surveillance which they dub, “Tracking the Digital Trail”, the SAP NS2 website proudly proclaims:

Everyone has a pattern of life. It’s the digital footprint we leave that matters. Cell phone records, bank transactions, email, and social media all form a history of a person’s activities and connections… national security personnel need to analyze this data quickly and accurately to derive actionable information… Analysts need solutions to make data actionable before it’s too late.

Exactly what capability global spy agencies have now in 2018 is anyone’s guess but the SAP-HANA platform represents at least the opportunity to combine global scale electronic surveillance with real-time processing and enforcement.

Based on the above, if you see the “Intelligence Community” as a group of trusted “public servants” and you believe that “if you’re not doing anything wrong, you have nothing to worry about”, you might even sleep better tonight, especially if you don’t read any further…

Michael Vickers was a special ops officer in Afghanistan during the 1980’s Soviet occupation. The Afghanistan operation, code named Cyclone by the CIA, is today better known as “Charlie Wilson’s War” (In the Hollywood movie, Vickers was played by Christopher Denham). Later Vickers became an Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations under George W. Bush and Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence under Obama. In 2015, he quit the Obama administration to become a campaign advisor to Hillary Clinton and wait in the wings for a top defense or intelligence appointment in the Clinton administration. In his view, as reported by MSNBC, Obama had become far too cautious in his military interventions after the chaos resulting from the U.S. lead overthrow of Gaddafi in 2011. He cited the “success” of 2001 bombing of the Taliban in Afghanistan. (You may recall the target of that action was to be Al-Qaida, but as they quickly escaped over the mountains to Pakistan, Taliban the target became.) Nevertheless, Vickers advocated direct U.S. airstrikes on the Assad regime in Syria and bombing of the Houthis in Yemen. According to MSNBC, he was undeterred by the fact that these latter targets were located in much more populated, urban areas than were the Taliban and would result in vastly increased civilian casualties. Both escalations advocated by Vickers were examples of how, in his own words he would, “advise the next president to respond aggressively to Iranian provocations around the world, despite the Iran nuclear deal.”

Besides becoming an advisor to the Clinton campaign, around the same time, Vickers became chairman of the SAP NS2 Advisory board. If you visit that link, next to Mike Vickers you’ll find a picture of Michael Morell. Morell is a former George W. Bush advisor, Obama deputy CIA director, and Hillary Benghazi talking points editor (over which, when exposed, he fell on his sword). He then did what technocrats on the outs do, he became a CBS news analyst. But in 2016 he quit that job to collect a paycheck on the SAP NS2 board and hoped to have his Benghazi loyalty rewarded as the Clinton CIA director to-be.

In August of 2016 Morell was interviewed on PBS’s Charlie Rose where he said explicitly, he wanted to have the Iranians and the Russians “pay a little price” for what “they” did to “us” in Iraq. (Who did what to who in Iraq?) Rose asked, “We make them pay the price by killing Russians and killing Iranians?” Morell replied, “Yes, yes, covertly so you don’t tell the world about it…but you make sure they know about it in Moscow and Tehran.” Never mind the sheer bloodlust on display, you don’t tell the “world” but you tell Charlie Rose?

So, are Vickers and Morell the kind of “trusted public servants” you want spying on you? (Actually, that is a trick question. If you read the 4th Amendment in the Bill of Rights, we can make an exception for Santa Clause spying on our kids without a warrant but that’s it.)

Back to ThreatConnect; reading the bios of both Vincent and Reichel on the TC website, the two principals both appear to be technically rather than politically oriented entrepreneurs and with impressive credentials at that. But in answering to the 16 Million dollar men above them, their political performance seems to have been more than adequate.

Two of the experts:

Thomas Rid

Recall Rid as an example of expertise rented out to, “someone who wanted to purchase some credibility for a notion that had none”? Clues as to who, (behind the obvious politicians) those “someones” might be, and their motivations can often be found in the donor lists published by the organizations in which experts like Rid enjoy their professorships, and senior fellowships, and whatnot. Top tier donations to the most influential think tanks often means $1,000,000 plus. So, just like when they give to political campaigns, corporations and foundations willing to throw that kind of money somewhere, are going to want something.

I can’t challenge Professor Rid’s credentials but I can say the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies shares donors with the Atlantic Council, houses the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies, and shares faculty and donors with the Center for a New American Security. PMCSS and CNAS are both are think tanks rife with pro-war, anti-Russia, Neo-Con industrial war-hawks whose paychecks depend on the endless “war on terror” and a very healthy Cold War II narrative, and certainly not talk of “getting along with Russia”.

Matt Tait/Pwn All The Things:

Less information is available about the funding of the Robert Strauss Center at the University of Texas at Austin (at which Tait is a senior fellow) than any of the think tanks I’ve researched. To me that is bothersome. However, bios of the top tier management at the Strauss Center read like a who’s who of non-governmental cheerleaders for governmental surveillance, censorship, and disinformation.

As mentioned above, Tait is a former member GCHQ (British equivalent of NSA). Also, I didn’t know what “Pwn” meant and had to look it up. Pronounced ‘pone’, apparently, it’s originally a gamer term and came about a number of years ago from a typo misspelling of ‘own’ in a popular video game. According to Merriam Webster it “is a lot like the sense of ‘own’ that means “to have power or mastery over (someone).” It has also been used to describe the act of gaining illegal access to something.” All this proves absolutely nothing but nicknames people choose for themselves say something about the individual. If you believe your mission in life is to ‘pwn all the things’, (and I don’t know that Matt does) you might be willing to do anything right or wrong in order to accomplish all that ‘pwning’ of all those things. For example, participate in a fraud to support the Military Industrial Gravy Train, jump on that train for some of your own, and seek to ‘pwn’ anyone who might try to stop the train or expose the fraud. If so, Matt is not alone. It’s all part of the “game.

Read Part II: “Sworn to protect us!”

Two Deep State Fucks Lie to Congress for Six Hours

That is a pretty harsh title describing career public servants who answered the call under oath, to share their deep concerns for the state of our national security, isn’t it? I guess I should tone it down a little by listing all the things I found positive about their testimony.

  1. George Kent was impeccably well-dressed.

Standard disclaimer: I am not a Trump supporter. If someone can beat him fair and square in 2020, more power to ‘em. If not, constitutionally speaking anyway he deserves another term. But I am very much in favor of impeaching Trump, not for Ukrainegate formerly known as Russiagate, but for something real like war crimes. By the same token, I’m in favor of something that can’t happen under the current legal system, prosecuting Obama, W. Bush, and Clinton for the same. All four deserve life sentences for mass murder and after a very public trial, if they wanted to commit suicide Epstein style, that would be a real shame.

Maybe devoted consumers of establishment media could be excused for believing these two gentlemen, to use the term incorrectly, were actually referring to serious, White House corruption that has threatened “our national security interests”, but for anyone taking time to understand the contradictions inherent in the narrative they both skillfully pushed should also see it points to decades-long, wide-spread corruption.

Remember the leaked phone call of Victoria Nuland saying “Fuck the EU”? In 2014, the big story was a US diplomat used a dirty word! The real story was a US diplomat planning to overthrow the democratically elected government of Ukraine and propping up the Azov Battalion in order to do it. This is only one example. This level of misbehavior on the part of the national security establishment is not only so common many take it as a matter of course but it eclipses in its seriousness any corruption Trump may or may not have been up to in that July phone call. Indeed the high station and elite status of these two, or maybe that they have jobs at all, is only one more symptom of the same corruption.

I have no interest whatever, in partisan distractions between the D’s and R’s who occupied the hearing room, especially since unflagging support for the military industrial gravy train is always bi-partisan. I believe scumbags like Taylor and Kent when they say they are non-partisan. They are members of the War party. They are proud of it and say so loud and clear, and as such share a loyalty with 99% of both houses of congress and certainly everyone allowed to ask them questions in front of the camera last Wednesday.

George Kent’s little speech for example, (Congress critters call that an “opening statement”), which he gave under “oath” can be easily reframed as a simple reaffirmation of his loyalty oath to the War party and nothing more.

Kent invoked ideology he believes we should share, throughout his statement and if we take him at his word, ideology is the motivator for the war Kent so strongly favors. Question: In war, what is more important, the ideology for which one fights or the ability to defeat the enemy? If the ideology is more important, then war is a poor means of imposing it since an army in defeat is useless to any agenda, ideological otherwise. Yet for Kent, not to wage that war is to betray his professed ideology. So, what has come of this inherent contradiction in the past five years since the start of that war beyond the nearly 13,000 dead?

Azov Battalion. That’s a NATO flag to the far left of the swastika.
Like Azov, The “Right Sector” is a Neo-Nazi paramilitary group founded after the 2014 NATO-backed coup.

A picture is worth a thousand words. When Kent and Taylor testified that cutting off lethal aid, (which was not actually cut off) and that Obama wisely refused to provide, is a threat to “our national security interests”, these are the guys to which they want to continue supplying guns and brand new fancy rockets. These are the guys Kent compared to the “Minutemen of 1776.”

The ideology of George Kent and William Taylor is war itself, reaping its fruits and nothing more. Thus is the purpose of the Military Industrial Complex. Their aim at the hearings was to not to allow Ukrainian lives get in the way of advancing this agenda and if they can bring down an orange haired political enemy who might threaten their just share of the spoils, all the better.

Fucks.

Watch all six hours and twenty minuets right here

Jeffrey Epstein, Google, and the Phantom Tennis Court

First of all the Jeffrey Epstein case is not about Jeffrey Epstein, not to me anyway. Rather it is a stark illustration of U.S. and global politics, power, and control the depth of which most people don’t experience, won’t experience, and don’t want to, ever.

I imagine to many, the Epstein case was a sensational media event they would rather ignore for the most part. It’s not something very important compared to the things the adults in the room should be concerned with in the “real news”, or better yet real life. Yet the media pushed the story anyway for clicks and ratings because thats what the media does. Besides, we all know there are corrupt, sleazy politicians like Bill Clinton and Donald Trump and crazy messed up Hollywood types like Kevin Spacey. We even accept, from time to time they will fall from grace, if they were ever endowed with any, in truly horrific ways. We learned that long ago from O.J. Simpson. Besides, none of it matters anyway because Epstein killed himself in his jail cell two months ago and dammit, we’ve got a president to impeach.

Given all that, is it even appropriate to ask why someone at Google would want to cover up something about the Epstein story? That’s just ridiculous.

Powerful elite and systematic pedophilia blackmail

It’s probably not controversial to say that politics and blackmail often go hand in hand. This notion becomes truly shocking and abhorrent, however when we discover heavily funded, systematic blackmail traps designed with the specific intention of capturing video footage of powerful individuals sexually abusing minors.

This kind of despicable activity has been variously reported on and covered up over the years dating back to the 1930’s and 40’s beginning with organized crime figures like mob boss Meyer Lansky and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover, though earlier operations don’t seem to have involved children so much as adult homosexual relations, (which was scandalous enough in those days to gain the desired leverage). Serena Shimm Award laureate, Whitney Webb has done an outstanding job of documenting the history and numerous connections including that of Jefferey Epstein for Mint Press News in a series of detailed articles. Important here is the existence of substantial evidence that Jeffrey Epstein had long-standing, close connections to both U.S. and Israeli intelligence as well as to organized crime.

Specific evidence as of late was revealed by Vicky Ward writing for the Daily Beast days after Epstein’s July 6, 2019 arrest which ultimately lead to the resignation of Trump administration Labor Secretary, Alexander Acosta. In her article Ward states:

A couple of years ago, I was interviewing a former senior White House official when the name Jeffrey Epstein came up….

Epstein’s name, I was told, had been raised by the Trump transition team when Alexander Acosta, the former U.S. attorney in Miami who’d infamously cut Epstein a non-prosecution plea deal back in 2007, was being interviewed for the job of labor secretary. The plea deal put a hard stop to a separate federal investigation of alleged sex crimes with minors and trafficking.

Is the Epstein case going to cause a problem [for confirmation hearings]?” Acosta had been asked. Acosta had explained… He’d cut the non-prosecution deal with one of Epstein’s attorneys because he had “been told” to back off, that Epstein was above his pay grade. “I was told Epstein ‘belonged to intelligence’ and to leave it alone,”…

Google connection to intelligence.

In 2015, journalist Nafeez Ahmed published a two-part article on the U.S. Intelligence community’s role in funding and monitoring the development by Stanford University students and later Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, of core technologies that when completed would become Google.com.

Like Webb’s coverage of the connection of organized child sex blackmail to the Intelligence Community and the Mob, Ahmed’s articles are lengthy, detailed, and well worth examining. Of particular interest, in part one, Ahmed discusses direction provided by Dr. Bhavani Thuraisingham, Dr. Rick Steinheiser in the establishment of Google.

In the late 1990’s, while working for the DARPA funded Mitre corp.,Thuraisingham headed the Massive Digital Data Systems Initiative (MDDS), a project sponsored by the NSA, CIA, and DNI.

Co-authored by Thuraisingham and Steinheiser, a founding document of the MDDS attached to a 2013 article by Thuraisingham states:

“To develop massive digital data systems for the IC [Intelligence Community], several technologies have to be integrated. These include the following: Data management, Knowledge management. Information management, Information visualization, Mass storage management and Distributed processing. The technical focus of the MDDS Initiative is to develop data management technologies. These include developing techniques for querying, browsing, and filtering; transaction processing; accesses [sic] methods and indexing; metadata management and data modeling; and integrating heterogeneous databases; as well as developing appropriate architectures.” 

Funding for the development of the key technologies by Page and Brin, that would eventually become Google, was provided to Stanford University by MDDS.

You’ll notice the above link leads to a 2015 “correction” by Thuraisingham of her own article. This was sparked directly by Ahmed’s attention to it. In it she raises numerous objections stopping just short of denying that “CIA funding was behind Google.” Ahmed provides two updates to part one of his article responding to objections by Dr. Thuraisingham as well as Dr. Steinheiser separately. In the updates Ahmed thoroughly invalidates Thuraisingham’s claims by dissecting her carefully crafted wording and providing documentation showing clear connections between Thuraisingham, Steinheiser, Page, and Brin. Ahmed’s update regarding Steinheiser shows his response to be hostile and intended to intimidate. This is not the approach of someone, falsely accused with the facts on their side.

Ironically, the purpose of the CIA, NSA, DNI, Stanford, Google project is transparently confessed by Thuraisingham herself in that 2013 article.

So now twenty years later, we have moved from Massive Data to Big Data …What is the difference? …the massiveness has changed. From several terabytes to a few petabytes of data back in the 1990s, we have now moved on to several petabytes to exabytes and even zetabytes of data…[b]ecause of the World Wide Web, social media, mobile technologies and developments in the human genome project, as well [as] progress in bioinformatics, geoinformatics, security informatics, and multimedia/video processing, among others. Massive amounts of data about entities and the relationships between them and the evolution of these relationships have to [be] modeled, stored, managed, queried and analyzed. The world population has increased by over 25% in the past 20 years and hundreds of millions of people from all over the world are joining social media…Therefore we need to be able to securely and efficiently handle the zetabytes of data without violating the privacy of individuals…

…I am very pleased to see that not only …the National Science Foundation and the Defense and Intelligence organizations are focusing on big data, practically every large company such as Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Oracle and IBM are starting initiatives. We all have to work together to tackle the big data challenge and make the world a better place to live.

The brazenness of this declaration on how the spy agencies can and will violate your privacy and your rights, for your own good no less, is truly amazing, not to mention the doublespeak of handling “zetabytes of data without violating” your privacy. “Newspeak” is probably more accurate. Incidentally, Thuraisingham posted this article two months before Edward Snowden publicized NSA mass surveillance in dramatic fashion.

There is no tennis court on Jeffrey Epstein’s Little Saint James, Pedophile Island

The following are images from Google Maps and Google Earth alternating with images of the same island, same feature taken from the Apple Maps app.

Little Saint James Island, Googlemaps.com
Little Saint James Island, Apple Maps app
Google Maps
Apple closeup
From Google Earth
Apple maps closeup of non-tennis court

The photos speak for themselves. Is there a tennis court there or not? Obviously, there is not. So why would someone at Google specifically place one there?

This looks to be the highest elevation on the island, it is far away from the house, from drinking water, a shower or shade.

We don’t know exactly when the two images were taken. The Google image has a copyright of 2019 while the Apple image gives no indication. I searched around on-line on how to determine a date or year for Apple Maps images but to no avail. Your mileage may vary.

Just looking at the images, we can surmise the Apple photo is older. On the Google image, directly to the upper lefthand corner of the berm structure there is what looks to be a drainage management project undertaken between the time of the two photos, presumably to prevent erosion of the road as water flows downhill to the retention pond.

So if we accept that the Apple image is older, would it logically follow that Epstein could have had a tennis court built inside that berm area after the Apple image was taken? Not really.

At 0:46 of this July15, 2019, CBS Inside Edition video, the berm enclosure can be clearly seen with no tennis court. The reporter calls it a helipad. It’s not a helipad either. The island has a helipad and it looks like this.

Little Saint James Island helipad

This location is much more convenient to the main residence than the “tennis court” and appears more accommodative to vehicles, provides shelter, etc. However, according to the airfield manager at Grafenweohr (Germany) Army Airfield (GAAF) , there can be a need for a berm around a helipad:

“If we have a situation for example where a Apache AH-64 tries to fire a rocket, …and that rocket doesn’t respond…. “We need to be ready to help them to disarm….The berm acts as a safety clearing barrel for any weapons that are not doing what they should on a helicopter….The newly completed berm will contain a 30mm round, and stop a Hell-fire missile in the event of negligent discharge….”

Grafenweohr was the one and only helipad with a berm I could find in my search. I think it’s fair to say Jeffrey Epstein never had to contend with this situation.

A YouTuber under the pseudonym, Rusty Shackleford posted numerous drone flyover videos of the island taken between 4/21 and 9/12/2019. The interior of the berm area is plain unlike the earlier Apple image and the second video of the two shows it being used as a parking area, with of all things an ambulance among the vehicles.

Little Saint James Island, Rusty Shackleford
An ambulance?: Rusty Shackleford.

There are conspiracy theories on line if you “Google!” “Jeffrey Epstein tennis court”. Here are a couple of links:

Google Covering For Epstein — Showing a Tennis Court Instead of the Human Sacrifice Heiau

What did the tennis court on Epstein Island cover up?

and

https[://]www.neonrevolt.com/2018/04/05/epsteins-island-digs-pizzagate-pedogate-qanon-greatawakening/

This was another relevant link but it wouldn’t post to WordPress as a normal link, Instead I received this error message:

Notice the terms, “pizzagate”, “pedogate”, and “qanon” appear in the html address. I don’t know why it didn’t work but Google isn’t the only one. If it is censorship, it is typical of a type that has been ever more prevalent on line over the past two to three years. The link pasted as text when I bracketed “://“. Remove the brackets and copy and paste into your browser.

All theories, even kooky ones, contain at least some factual information that can be verified, and this story and subject matter being as broad as it is opaque, make any theory worth entertaining. Regardless, none should be censored.

On this post I only wanted to raise the following questions:

What is Google and the National Security State covering up?

Why?

For whom?

Google

Don’t be evil!

An ironic slogan. Interesting that they dropped it.

An Evil Thing?

Recently over text, and a long distance, a friend and I were debating the merits and motives of US interventions in other countries around the world, and in the case of covert intervention, whether or not it was occurring currently in one country in particular.

I am very much a non-interventionist. I don’t believe US motives are what the government or the water-carrying media say they are, and though we can’t know all the secrets, leaks are common and the playbook repeats itself again and again. 

But this post is not about interventionism. All this is just background on how I came around to the subject. In our back and forth, responding to my stance that US spy agencies were up to no good as usual, he said, “you see the US as this evil thing”.

We all have biases and they can often seem impenetrable even when doing our best to remain fact based and rational. At the same time I don’t have much patience for hyperbole, logical fallacies or any kind of phony arguments and to me, “evil thing” implies among other things, something that is absolute, irredeemable and outside the realm of what is rational, entirely. His statement could be seen as an attempt to distract from the issues, shut down the discussion and escape from an argument he didn’t feel he could win on the merits but I don’t think so. I have to give him credit. Even, without re-reading the whole conversation, I’d be willing to believe “the US is an evil thing” was screaming at him from between the lines of everything I was writing to him. He just made an honest observation. Maybe my thinking isn’t as rational as I like to believe and he was just calling me on it. That is always possible. Not only that, self-reflection is necessary for each one of us so as not to become something like an “evil thing”. 

“The US” on the other hand, like any nation state is not capable of self-reflection. Only an individual who identifies him or herself as an “American” can imagine some how doing that on it’s behalf. These are numerous people who reflexively say “we” are doing this or “we” did that when referring to actions of the government or military. It’s a common way of thinking, even “normal”, and since most of us don’t want to think of ourselves as evil “we” tend to absolve “our” government of anything that might cause the reflection in the mirror to grow horns. Ignoring, forgetting, deflecting, and watching FoxNews or CNN are effective remedies to that problem as well. Personally, I like to remove myself from this particular “we” in thinking and speaking because it helps remove any number of jingoistic traps I can, and have fallen into in the past. I’m not claiming that it’s the right way, only that it works for me.

As I see it, this is not a question of being patriotic or unpatriotic and no, I don’t see the US as an evil thing, per se. The US is only doing what empires do. And, it’s been doing what empires do, arguably since 1607 , and if a consensus of mainstream historians means much of anything, certainly since 1898 .

I don’t see the US as an evil thing,

I see empire as an evil thing.

All of the numbers for Hitler, Stalin, and Mao are from Wikipedia and so are the US figures, pre 9-11. The horrific increase since 9-11 is from a threepart series by Nicolas J.S. Davies for Consortiumnews.com written last year. The series covers Iraq Wars II, 2.5, III, and 3.5, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Syria, Yemen, and Somalia from December 2001 to early 2018. Could my numbers be off? This was done quickly. There are plenty of higher and lower estimates but would a million here, a million there change the basic facts? I’ll just tell you they’re probably off, substantially.

For example, I’ve left out the deaths in all US proxy wars from before 9-11. Also, the 1950 starting point is arbitrary. The US entry into World War I was entirely by choice and only with imperial and financial motives, whereas the American people whose sons would die for those motives were told, “The world must be made safe for democracy”. It was a lie. More controversially, recent research into World War II shows the US to be every bit a belligerent nation as Germany or Japan. 

So, only looking at the period since the beginning of the Korean war until now, notice the high US estimate is greater than the low “Hitler” estimate. The US has at least, as Dave Smith recently put it, reached “Hitler level.”

If you’re assessing the actions of your own country and “Hiller level” becomes a handy unit of measure, and you’re also convinced your country isn’t an evil thing, what do you do with that?

Is mass murder something that is, ”absolute, irredeemable and outside the realm of what is rational, entirely”? I think most people agree it was when Hitler did it.

Do “we” have to go all the way to “Mao level” to qualify as an evil thing? 

Should 12,000,000 people dead at the hands of the United States being an “evil thing” be a debatable matter of opinion?

Should these be difficult questions to answer?

I was told Epstein ‘belonged to intelligence’ and to leave it alone

…It is a criminal and unconscionable blackmail operation…hidden in plain sight, for over half a century, exploiting and destroying the lives of untold numbers of children in the process…

All of this has taken place with the full knowledge and blessing of top figures in the world of “philanthropy” and in the U.S. government and intelligence communities, with great influence over several presidential administrations, particularly since the rise of Ronald Reagan and continuing through to Donald Trump.

Whitney Webb

In a series of articles, writing for Mintpress News, award winning journalist Whitney Webb reveals that Jeffery Epstein was only the latest in a long line of “Epsteins” going back to infamous Mob boss, Meyer Lansky whose accomplices in those days included legendary FBI director, J. Edgar Hoover.

Whitney demonstrates at great length, the “Epstein scandal” is not a recent or stand alone story but that it provides enormously disturbing insight into the workings of the United States government and empire at it’s highest levels for over seventy years of it’s history.

TOO BIG TO FAIL ~ Hidden in Plain Sight: The Shocking Origins of the Jeffrey Epstein Case

TOO BIG TO FAIL ~ Government by Blackmail: Jeffrey Epstein, Trump’s Mentor and the Dark Secrets of the Reagan Era

TOO BIG TO FAIL  ~ Mega Group, Maxwells and Mossad: The Spy Story at the Heart of the Jeffrey Epstein Scandal

TOO BIG TO FAIL ~ From “Spook Air” to the “Lolita Express”: The Genesis and Evolution of the Jeffrey Epstein-Bill Clinton Relationship

The articles are long, detailed and filled with connections between various players who at times can seem far afield from each other, then suddenly collide creating brand new new rabbit holes to add to the complexity. The so called “Epstein scandal” is one of many avenues from which one can gain unvarnished insight into this entity we proudly, or with a roll of the eyes refer to as “our government”. As the news cycle turns, I imagine most Americans would prefer to forgetfully turn away from the whole mess along with it and consume the next bunch of talking points whatever they may be.

But, considering these engrained and decades long practices involve the very real victimization of very real children, I am simply asking that you take the time to learn more about this matter and ask why in seventy years of voting, trending ‘left” and “right” Republican and Democrat, with Congresses and the White House moving back and forth dozens of times, pedophile blackmail operations have been a prevalent means of leverage and influence at the highest levels government. Is it, as conventional wisdom would have it, a matter of electing the right people and implementing the right reforms?

Even as Whiney Webb has lain it out in plain language in both her articles and many interviews, I’ve found keeping track of the facts and people involved to be difficult but worth the trouble. For my own purposes, I’ve tried to boil it down into the basic names and facts and occasional speculations in order to quickly scan and reference as needed. I’ve posted my work here for anyone interested but first I highly recommend you read Whitney’s articles in their entirety.

“Epsteins” 1&2:

Meyer Lansky and Lewis Rosenstiel

Samuel Bronfman was a major Canadian bootlegger

Bronfman liquor was purchased in massive quantities by  New York Mob boss Meyer Lansky.

Crucial to Bronfman’s bootlegging operations was Lewis Rosenstiel  part of an organized crime ‘consortium’ with Lansky


Samuel Bronfman’s son, Charles cofounded the Mega Group with Leslie Wexner in 1991.


Journalist Ed Reid, author of The Mistress and the Mafia, wrote Lansky sent Virginia Hill to Mexico in 1939, to seduce numerous “top politicians, army officers, diplomats and police officials.” that later involved the OSS

During WWII Lansky and Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel — worked with Naval intelligence in Operation Underworld,”

Douglas Valentine: The CIA as Organized Crime: How Illegal Operations Corrupt America and the World 

In the 1940s Lansky obtained compromising photos of J. Edgar Hoover that showed Hoover in sexual contact with FBI Deputy Director Clyde Tolson.

 A former Lansky associate, said Lansky had claimed, “I fixed that sonofabitch.”

In return for services rendered during [World War II], Mafia bosses were protected from prosecution for dozens of unsolved murders.

The Mafia emerged from the war empowered and was a huge problem in 1951 [when the Kefauver Committee was convened],


After the war, the CIA (formerly OSS) reestablished ties with Lansky at the behest of James J. Angleton. The CIA would later turn to the Lansky-linked mob in the early 1960s to assassinate Fidel Castro,

Lansky was also connected to Tibor Rosenbaum, an arms procurer and high-ranking official the Mossad, whose bank – the International Credit Bank of Geneva – laundered much of Lansky’s ill-gotten gains and recycled them into legitimate American businesses.


Lewis Rosenstiel was known for bugging his offices in order to hear what employees said about him when he wasn’t present.

His bisexual antics, were well-known to his close associates.

According to Rosenstiel’s wife Susan Kaufman he hosted parties that included“boy prostitutes” “for the enjoyment” of guests, which included important government officials and prominent figures in America’s criminal underworld.

The venues were bugged with microphones for the purpose of blackmail.

Bronfman and Rosenstiel were closely connected to Meyer Lansky,

the only famous mobster in the 1920s

who never serve a day in jail,

These “blackmail parties” would grow dramatically in the 1950s

At Rosenstiel’s parties,” with figures of the Mafia, Hoover was said to have worn women’s clothing and Meyer Lansky’s wife later said that her husband had photos of the former Hoover in drag.

This was also described by two witnesses not connected to Kaufman.

Hoover is on record showing unusual concern in the FBI’s handling of Rosenstiel’s criminal links as early as 1939, the same year Lansky was actively orchestrating the sexual blackmail of powerful political figures.

The blackmail acquired on Hoover has been cited  in his denial that nationwide organized crime was a serious issue.

Rosenstiel protected Lansky from legal scrutiny with his child prostitution and blackmail ring targeting high-ranking officials, and he was overheard saying that if the government “ever brings pressure against Lansky or any of us, we’ll use this [a specific recording taken at one of the ‘parties’] as blackmail.” 

Rosenstiel’s FBI file, obtained by Anthony Summers, in 1956.

After requesting a meeting, Rosenstiel was granted a personal face-to-face with the director in a matter of hours. Rosenstiel heavily lobbied Hoover to aid his business interests.

Soon after their first “official” meeting, the public relationship between the two men flourished, with Hoover sending Rosenstiel flowers when he fell ill.

Summers reported that, Rosenstiel was heard telling Hoover “your wish is my command.”

Hoover was well-known for amassing blackmail on friend and foe alike. files he used to gain favors and protect his status as FBI director for as long as he wished. 

Hoover knew he was compromised and Hoover’s involvement in the operation would have served as a means of procuring the blackmail for his own purposes.

If Hoover was merely being blackmailed and extorted by the Lansky-Rosenstiel connected mob, it is unlikely that he would have been so friendly to Rosenstiel, Lansky and the other mobsters at these gatherings.

According to journalist and author Burton Hersh, Hoover was also tied to Sherman Kaminsky, who ran a sexual blackmail operation involving young males. That operation was busted and investigated in ‘66 led by Manhattan DA Frank Hogan.

FBI took over the investigation and photos of Hoover and Kaminsky disappeared from the case file.

Hoover and Rosenstiel’s deep ties can be seen in Rosenstiel’s hiring of Hoover aide Louis Nichols as  the Vice President  of Schenley liquor and Rosenstiel’s donation of over $1 million to the J. Edgar Hoover Foundation, which Nichols also ran. 

“Epstein” number 3: 

Roy Cohn


Roy Cohn was not the only one close to Ronald Reagan running pedophile blackmail operations

but

all of them had connections to CIA Director William Casey and

Roy Cohn.


Roy Cohn became closely associated with the Reagan White House, the CIA, the FBI, organized crime and, many figures who would surround Jeffrey Epstein.

in the early 1950’s, Cohn was a key figure in the trial of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg and later as the right-hand man of 

Joseph McCarthy. 

The date and circumstances around Cohn’s introduction to Rosenstiel are hard to come by but may include associates of Meyer Lansky

Cohn’s dedication to anti-communist activities endeared him to J. Edgar Hoover, whom he first met in 1952.

 Bobby and J. Edgar: The Historic Face-Off Between the Kennedys and J. Edgar Hoover That Transformed America, (Burton Hersh) 

Hoover expressed admiration for Cohn’s aggressive and manipulative tactics and told Cohn to “call me directly” whenever he had information worth sharing. From that point on, Cohn and Hoover “traded favors, compliments, gifts and private dinners. It quickly became ‘Roy’ and ‘Edgar.’” Hersh describes Hoover as Cohn’s “consigliere.” 

Hoover’s recommendation of Cohn was a deciding factor in his appointment as McCarthy’s general counsel over Robert Kennedy, a rival and bitter enemy of Cohn’s.

Cohn’s antics on the McCarthy committee would lead to his downfall when attempted to blackmail the Army for preferential treatment for committee consultant and Cohn’s rumored lover, David Schine.

However, a few years later New York Judge David Peck, a long-time associate of CIA-Alan Dullesorchestrated Cohn’s hire to Saxe, Bacon O’Shea and /Bolan. Cohn brought in a slew of Mafia- clients, including Gambino, Genovese and Rosenstiel.

Susan Kaufman attended parties hosted by Cohn with her husband Lewis Rosenstiel in 1958 at Manhattan’s Plaza Hotel, suite 233. Kaufman testified that young boys were present and that

Cohn, J. Edgar Hoover and Rosenstiel engaged in sexual activity with them.

Roy Cohn was providing protection. That’s where Cohn got his power from —blackmail” –  John Klotz

NYPD detective, James Rothstein told John DeCamp the following about Cohn:

Cohn’s job was to run the little boys. Say you had an admiral, a general, a congressman, who did not want to go along with the program. Cohn’s job was to set them up, then they would go along. Cohn told me that himself.”

Cohn also identified this sexual blackmail operation as being part of the anti-communist crusade which suggests the FBI may have been connected with child sex blackmail at a broader level than Hoover personally, as FBI closely coordinated with McCarthy and Cohn.

Roy Cohn remains a controversial figure because of his close, personal relationship with

Donald Trump who became Cohn’s protege in the mid-1970s.

It is unknown if the sex ring at the Plaza continued, after Cohn’s death from AIDS in 1986 but

Donald Trump purchased the Plaza Hotel in 1988. 

It would be reported and confirmed that Trump hosted parties at the Plaza … where “young women and girls were introduced to older, richer men” and “illegal drugs and young women were passed around and used.” 

Andy Lucchesi, a male model who had helped organize  Plaza Hotel parties for Trump, said 

A lot of girls, 14, look 24. That’s as juicy as I can get…”

Cohn’s network extends to

Bill Clinton, whose friend and longtime political advisor,

Richard “Dirty Dick” Morris, was Cohn’s cousin and close associate. Morris was also close to Clinton’s communications director,

George Stephanopoulos,

who is also associated with Jeffrey Epstein.

Roy Cohn’s birthday parties over the years attracted such figures Andy Warhol, Calvin Klein, Joey Adams, and notable political figures including Mayor of New York Abraham Beame, Chuck Schumer, Margaret Trudeau, mother of Justin Trudeau, where she famously toppled his birthday cake and, Donald Trump.

Those invited to Cohn’s parties were said to have “had open accounts in Cohn’s favor bank


Roy Cohn’s “favor bank”

and his unique position as a liaison between the

criminal underworld,

the rich and famous, and

top media influencers made him a force to be reckoned with. Yet, it was his political connections to leadership figures in both the

Republican and Democratic parties and his close relationship to long-time FBI Director

J. Edgar Hoover, among other figures, that made him and his dark secret

“untouchable” for much of his life.


Many of Cohn’s celebrity friendships were cultivated through Studio 54 . Cohn was friends with owners, Steve Rubell and Ian Schrager.

Among Cohn’s closest friends were Barbara Walters, who he referred to as his “fiancee” and whom he introduced to the head of the U.S. Information Agency, Chad Wick, in the Reagan White House. Cohn’s friends also included:

Abe Rosenthal, executive editor of the New York Times

William Safire New York Times columnist; and 

George Sokolsky of The New York Herald TribuneNBC and ABC

Sokolsky was particularly close to Cohn and J. Edgar Hoover

Sokolsky ran the American Jewish League Against Communism with Cohn for several years and the organization 

named its Medal of Honor after Sokolsky.

Cohn also leaned on his friend, S.I. Newhouse Jr., for media influence. Newhouse oversaw the media empire that now includes Vanity Fair, Vogue, GQ, The New Yorker, numerous local newspapers, and cable television

New York Magazine noted  “Cohn used his influence in the early ’80s to secure favors for …Mob clients in Newhouse publications.” 

Cohn’s pals, Generoso Pope Jr. and Richard Berlin, became the owners of the National Enquirer and the Hearst Corporation, respectively. 

Also, friends Mort Zuckerman, and Rupert Murdoch – would befriend Jeffrey Epstein.

William F. Buckley attacked Cohn’s enemies like Manhattan DA Robert Morgenthau — in columns, using Cohn as an anonymous source. 

Buckley received the George Sokolsky medal alongside “Supreme Commander” Lewis Rosenstiel in 1966. 

Buckley got a heavily discounted $65,000 loan to buy a luxury boat from a bank where Cohn had hand-picked the president, according to LIFE magazine

William F. Buckley 

Barbara Walters 

Alan Dershowitz 

Donald Trump 

were all character witnesses for Cohn during his 1986 disbarment hearings. 

All but Buckley had relationships with Jeffrey Epstein.

Cohn became even more powerful with the rise of 

Ronald Reagan.

He remained a Democrat all his life, but Cohn was a “fixer” for Republican candidates with outsized roles in the ‘76 and ‘80 Reagan campaigns. 

During the 80 campaign Cohn met Roger Stone

whom he instructed to leave a hefty bribe  at the New York Liberal Party’s headquarters. 

Cohn would also meet Paul Manafort and Donald Trump.

Cohn’s law partner, Tom Bolanchaired Reagan’s transition team in 1980. 

Reagan named Bolan, a director of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation

Bolan was New York finance co-chair in the ’80 and ’84 Reagan campaigns. 

Bolan was close to William F. Buckley Jr., Donald Trump and Rupert Murdoch.

Bolan was instrumental in securing federal judgeships for several who would become influential,

including Louis Freeh

Cohn was able to get others appointed as federal judgesincluding 

Donald Trump’s sister, Maryanne Trump Barry. 

Donald Trump called Cohn to thank him. 

Cohn was not given a public position in the Reagan administration, but worked with campaign communications director and CIA director, William Casey. According to Christine Seymour — Cohn’s long-time switchboard operator, Casey “called [Cohn] almost daily” during the 1980 campaign.

Seymour also noted one of Cohn’s other frequent phone pals was Nancy Reagan and his client. It was largely Cohn’s death from AIDS that led her to “encourage her husband to seek more funding for AIDS research.” 

Prior to Cohn’s death, Nancy and Ronald secured his spot in an exclusive experimental AIDS treatment program, despite Reagan’s “non-response” to the AIDS crisis. 

Ronald Reagan was also a friend of Cohn’s. According to Robert Parry, “lavished favors including invitations to the White House, personal thank-you notes and birthday wishes” 

Reagan heavily courted the evangelical right and promoted “family values”. The close ties of himself, and inner circle, with Cohn may seem odd. However, Reagan had deep ties to the same organized-crime factions that were among Cohn’s clients, including Cohn’s mentor, Lewis Rosenstiel (see Part I).


Reagan’s mentor, MCA president Lew Wasserman

-had close ties to the mob

-was known for making Reagan’s film and TV career,

supported Reagan’s push to become president of the Screen Actors Guild, 

-MCA was a major financier of Reagan’s gubernatorial bid in 1966 

The Reagan administration shut down a DOJ probe into MCA’s ties to organized crime.


According to Shawn Swords, filmmaker of Wages of Spin II: Bring Down That Wall:

Reagan’s whole career was guided by MCA, by Wasserman and founder Jules Stein, who said Reagan was malleable, they could do what they wanted with him. 

Swords’ characterization is supported by an unnamed Hollywood source cited in a DOJ document.

As a young man, Lew Wasserman joined the Mayfield Road Gang, run by Moe Dalitz, who, per the FBI, was second only to Meyer Lansky himself in the Jewish mob. 

Lew Wasserman married Edith Beckerman, whose father was Dalitz’s lawyer

Wasserman’s lawyer, Sidney Korshak, had close ties to Dalitz and partnered with Lansky in the Acapulco Towers Hotel. 

New West magazine stated in 1976 Korshak was the “logical successor to Meyer Lansky.Korshak, like Roy Cohn gained a reputation as 

a bridge between organized crime and respectable society.

the DOJ probe into MCA that Reagan quashed was reportedly spurred after DOJ learned that Gambino crime family member, Salvatore Pisello, was doing business with MCA

Gambino crime family boss, Paul Castellanowas a client of Roy Cohn. 

Less well-known is how Cohn aided the CIA’s covert propaganda efforts that were part of Iran-Contra.

Cohn forged close ties with director of the U.S. Information Agency, Chad Wick, even hosting a luncheon in Wick’s honor attended by figures in the conservative press, senators and representatives. 

Soon after, CIA Director and Cohn friend William Casey was spearheading a PR campaign for Reagan’s Latin American policies, and the Contras

Though the propaganda effort was technically illegal, the CIA outsourced the job to minimize fall-out. 

Robert Parry reported in 2015, right after Chad Wick, of the U.S. Information Agency promised to find private support, 

Cohn brought Rupert Murdoch, to the White House to provide funding for the propaganda campaign. 

The friendship of Murdoch and Cohn began with their support for Israel

Cohn was Murdoch’s attorney, according to New York Magazine, “Whenever Roy wanted a story stopped, put in, or exploited, he called Murdoch”, 

after Murdoch boughtthe New York Post. According to Robert Parry, Cohn “wielded the paper as his personal shiv. 

Murdoch became the top media ally of this Casey-directed propaganda effort, and increasingly close to the Reagan White House. 

Murdoch benefited from Reagan’s policies and friendship which allowed him to increase U.S. media holdings and create Fox Broadcasting Corporation in 1987.

The Cohn and Epstein, sexual blackmail operations share the same famous friends, connections to intelligence, and modern-day mob-linked businessmen rebranded as “philanthropists.” 

Cohn was known to have successors, as revealed by scandals in the early 1990s swept under the rug. The significant amount of overlap strongly suggest that Epstein was one of Roy Cohn’s successors.

“Epsteins” 4 & 5:

Robert Keith Gray and Edwin Wilson

Robert Keith Gray, former chairman and CEO of public relations firm Hill and Knowlton,

which 60 Minutes  called “an unelected shadow government”.

the Washington Post, called Gray “one of the most sought-after lobbyists in Washington”

A Washington Post reporter called Gray “the man in the black tuxedo with snow-white hair and a smile like a diamond.”

Gray, was a close adviser to Eisenhower and Nixon,

a “six-figure globs” Republican fundraiser according to the Washingtonian. 

Robert Keith Gray was director of communications during Reagan’s 1980 campaign under William Casey, who later became CIA director.

Gray returned to the PR business, taking on several clients including Saudi arms dealer

Adnan Khashoggi

and hedge fund manager Marc Rich

The connection between Gray and Casey is particularly telling,

John DeCamp reported Gray was a specialist in homosexual blackmail operations for the CIA and collaborated with Roy Cohn in those activities.

Cohn and Gray would have known each other during Reagan’s 1980 campaign when Casey, Gray’s boss — was calling Roy Cohn “every day,” according to Christine Seymour.

In the 1970s, Robert Keith Gray served on the board of Consultants International a CIA front company founded by CIA and Naval Intelligence officer Edwin Wilson.

Wilson was caught illegally selling weapons to Libya in 1983

a Navy review of Wilson’s intelligence career was unearthed by journalist Peter Maas,

Wilson also ran sexual blackmail operations for the CIA, at the time of Watergate according to his partner and CIA agent Frank Terpil.

Jim Hougan: 

one of Wilson’s Agency jobs was to subvert members of both houses [of Congress] …. Certain people could be coerced by living out their sexual fantasy …. A remembrance of these occasions [was] recorded via cameras…. [by] TSD [Technical Services Division of the CIA].

According to Terpil, Wilson ran his operation out of the George Town Club, owned by lobbyist and Korean intelligence asset Tongsun Park. Park set up the club on behalf of the Korean Central Intelligence Agency in an effort to influence U.S. politicians and officials.” The president of the George Town Club at the time  was Robert Keith Gray.

DeCamp later reported that Wilson’s activities were a spin-off of the same sexual blackmail operation in which Cohn became involved during the McCarthy era with Lewis Rosenstiel and J. Edgar Hoover.

“Epsteins” 6 & 7:

Father Bruce Ritter and Cardinal Francis Spellman

Another pedophile network connected to a close associate of George H.W. Bush in the early 1990s was run out of the Catholic charity Covenant House, founded by Father Bruce Ritter.

In 1968, Ritter asked his superior — Cardinal Francis Spellman of New York — for permission to take homeless teenage, boys and girls, into his home in Manhattan. 

Spellman was accused of pedophilia and ordained known pedophiles as the highest-ranking Catholic priest in the US. 

Spellman was also a close associate of Roy Cohn, and his law partner Tom Bolan

Spellman was alleged to have been seen at least one of Cohn’s “blackmail parties.” 

Spellman’s nephew, worked for Roy Cohn

Ritter, like Spellman and other priests who served under Spellman, was of having sexual relationships with many of the underaged boys he had taken in, 

Ritter’s activities at Covenant House were exposed  in 1989 by New York Post, Charles M. Sennott, who would later state that “the secular powers more than the archdiocese protected him [Ritter].” 

Sennott’s report was attacked viciously by columnists in other New York media and Governor Mario Cuomo

The likely reason these “secular powers” came to the aid of Ritter, is that Covenant House and Ritter was deeply tied to Robert Macauley, a long-time friend of the Bush family. Macauley was “instrumental” to Covenant House fundraising and brought on several “wealthy well-connected people,” including former government officials and investment bankers.

Macauley’s organization, the AmeriCares Foundation, which was later accused of funneling money to the Contras, was a main source of funding of Covenant House

AmeriCares also worked with U.S. intelligence

Ritter visited Macauley’s Connecticut estate 

Ritter was VP of AmeriCares until he was forced to resign from Covenant House. 

George H.W. Bush’s brother, Prescott, was also on the AmeriCares advisory board

From 1985 to 1989, Covenant House’s operating budget grew from $27 million to $90 million and its board included top executives at 

IBM

Chase Manhattan Bank 

Bear Stearns.

“Epstein” number 8: 

Roberto Alejos Arzu, a CIA asset

Covenant House opened branches in Canada, Mexico and Central America. Its first Central America branch was in Guatemala headed by 

Roberto Alejos Arzu, a CIA asset whose plantation was used to train the troops used in the “Bay of Pigs”

Alejos Arzu was also an associate of U.S.-backed dictator of Nicaragua, Anastasio Somoza

and a member of the Knights of Malta, a Catholic order to which William Casey and Roy Cohn’s law partner Tom Bolan  also belonged. 


Tom Bolanchaired Reagan’s transition team in 1980. 

Reagan named Bolan, a director of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation

Bolan was in the ’80 and ’84 Reagan campaigns. 

Bolan was close to William F. Buckley Jr., Donald Trump and Rupert Murdoch.

Bolan was instrumental in securing federal judgeships for several who would become influential,

 including Louis Freeh


Alejos Arzu also worked for AmeriCares and was tied to several Central American paramilitary groups

Intelligence sources cited by DeCamp assert that the Alejos Arzu-led branch of Covenant House procured children for a pedophile ring based in the United States. 

“Epstein” number 9: 

Craig Spence

After leaving ABC News in the 1980s, Craig Spence found success as a prominent conservative Washington lobbyist. 

In June 1989, it was revealed that Spence had been pimping out children to the power elite in Washington throughout the 1980s in apartments that were bugged with video and audio recording equipment

In the NYT in 1982 Spence said his “party guest lists constitute a ‘Who’s Who’ in Congress, Government and journalism” 

Spence was known to throw parties, which the Times described as “glitter[ed] ambassadors, television stars, senators, senior State Department officials.” 

Roy Cohn

William Casey and Cohn’s journalist friend 

William Safire were some of the attendees 

the Times article continues, 

Richard Nixon 

John Mitchell. 

Eric Sevareid 

John Glenn 

Peter Ustinov” 

Ustinov wrote for The European newspaper founded in 1990 by 

Robert Maxwell, the father of Epstein’s alleged madam 

Ghislaine Maxwell and a known Mossad agent.

Seven years after the Times’ profile It was revealed  that 

Spence was linked to a “homosexual prostitution ring” 

and his parties were bugged “to compromise guests.” 

Spence also offered cocaine as another means of blackmail.

According to DeCamp, Spence was known to offer young children for sex to attendees at his blackmail parties.

a Reagan White House official and an Air Force sergeant confirmed that Spence’s house was filled with recording equipment.

The report also documented Spence’s connections to U.S. intelligence, particularly the CIA. According to the Washington Times report, Spence “often boasted that he was working for the CIA. 

The Washington Times report  Spence had spoken of smuggling cocaine into the U.S. from El Salvador, involving U.S. military. Given the timing of these comments and CIA’s involvement in cocaine for weapons in Iran Contra, his comments may have been much more than just boasts.

One of the most critical parts: 

Spence was able to enter the White House late at night during the George H.W. Bush administration with young men whom the Washington Times described as “call boys.” 

Spence later stated that his contacts in the White House, were “top level” and he singled out Pres Bush’s National Security Advisor Donald Gregg

Gregg had worked at CIA since 1951 before he resigned in 1982 to become National Security Advisor to VicePres Bush

Gregg had worked directly under William Casey and, in the late 1970s,

with William Barr in stonewalling the Pike & Church Committees in 1975. The committees were investigating the CIA’s “love traps,” or sexual blackmail operations used to lure foreign diplomats to bugged apartments, complete with recording equipment and two-way mirrors.

Barr would later become Bush’s Attorney General, rising to that post yet again under Trump


Furthermore, Barr’s father Donald Barr worked for the precursor to the CIA, the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) and recruited a young Jeffrey Epstein, then a high school drop-out, to teach at the elite Dalton School, from which Epstein was later fired.

A year prior to hiring Epstein, Donald Barr published a science fiction fantasy novel about sex slavery.

Notably, the same year Donald Barr hired Epstein, his son was working for the CIA.

Bill Barr has refused calls to recuse himself from the Epstein case, even though he worked at the same law firm that has represented Epstein in the past.


Donald Gregg is also connected to Roy Cohn’s “influence machine” through his daughter’s marriage to Christopher Buckley, the son of William F. Buckley

The Washington Times reports Spence’s child sex ring also had close ties to Roy Cohn. One of the source alleged he had attended a birthday party for Roy Cohn that Spence had hosted and that William Casey was in attendance. Spence was said to often brag about his social companions and regularly mentioned Cohn

“Epstein” number 10: 

Larry King

“Bodies by God” 

The revelation of Craig Spence’s “call boy ring” led to the discovery of the Franklin child sex abuse and ritual murder ring run out of Omaha by Larry King, a Republican lobbyist who ran the Franklin Community Federal Credit Union.

May 1989 article in the Omaha World Herald’s reported, “…that money from the credit union …found its way to the Nicaraguan contra rebels.” 

Subsequent reporting by the Houston Post’s Pete Brewton, who discovered that the CIA, and organized crime, had secretly borrowed money from various savings and loans (S&L) institutions to fund covert operations. One of those S&Ls had Neil Bush, George H.W. Bush’s son, on its board and it had done business with King’s organization.

Another link between King and Iran Contra is King co-founded and donated $25,000 to Reagan affiliated, Citizens for America, which sponsored speaking trips for Oliver North and Contra leaders

The director of Citizens for America was David Carmen, who ran a public relations firm with the former head of covert operations at the Casey-led CIA, his father Gerald Carmen, who was appointed by Reagan to head the General Services Administration and an ambassadorship.

Spence was connected to King:   

The way we discovered… [King’s] … Nebraska… call boy ring, … the credit card chits of Spence’s ring…”

It was later revealed that King and Spence were business partners in a group nicknamed “Bodies by God.”

King and Spence were connected to prominent officials in the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations, including ties to CIA and the Roy Cohn network.

Spence, hinted to Washington Times reporters Michael Hedges and Jerry Seper, they had merely scratched the surface of something much darker: 

“All this stuff you’ve uncovered [involving call boys], … is insignificant compared to other things I’ve done…” 

King’s child sex abuse ring was quickly and aggressively covered upby theFBI

It is important to recall the role former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover played in blackmail operations that abused children (See Part I

and the close relationship between Hoover, Roy Cohn and Lewis Rosenstiel.

Documents released by the FBI show that Epstein became an FBI informant in 2008, when Robert Mueller was the Bureau’s director, in exchange for immunity from federal charges, 

In addition, former FBI Director Louis Freeh would be hired by Alan Dershowitz, (who is accused of raping girls at Epstein’s homes and was once a character witness for Roy Cohn,) to intimidate Epstein’s victims. 

Freeh’s appointment as a judge for the US District Court for the Southern District of New Yorwas orchestrated by Cohn’s law partner

Tom Bolan.

Thus, the FBI’s cover-up of the Franklin case is just one example of the Bureau’s long-standing practice of protecting these pedophile rings. It also makes it worth questioning the impartiality of

 Maurene Comey, daughter of

James Comey, a main prosecutor in the Epstein case.


Robert Keith Gray was deputy director of communications in Reagan’s 1980 campaign under William Casey, who later became CIA director.

Gray returned to the PR business, taking on several clients including

Adnan Khashoggi

and Marc Rich

Marc Rich, was a Mossad asset. 

Marc Rich’s pardon by Bill Clinton was largely orchestrated by Mega Group members Michael Steinhardt and Israeli politicians like

Ehud Barak.


A matter of months after Cohn’s death another individual became a central figure in the powerful Cohn had cultivated.

Jeffrey Epstein, would be recruited, after his firing from the Dalton School, by Alan “Ace” Greenberg, a close friend of Cohn, to work at

Bear Stearns.

After leaving Bear Stearns and working as a “financial bounty hunter” for clients like Iran-Contra-linked arms dealer 

Adnan Khashoggi,

Epstein would come into contact with Leslie Wexner, a billionaire close to the Meyer Lansky-linked Bronfman family, who himself was tied to members of the crime syndicates once represented by Cohn.


Epstein shares considerable overlap with the network here and in Part I

He is also deeply connected to the 

Mega Group and its associates, like Ghislaine Maxwell’s father, Robert Maxwell

Part III of this series focuses on the Mega Group starting with 

Ronald Lauder

Billionaire heir to the Estee Lauder cosmetics fortune

President of the World Jewish Congress

Mega Group member, former member of the 

Reagan administration, long-time donor to 

Benjamin Netanyahu and the Likud Party, as well as a long-time friend of 

Donald Trump and 

Roy Cohn.

In a statement  to New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman in 2018, Lauder noted he has known Donald Trump for over 50 years, when Trump was a student at Wharton which Lauder also attended. 

The two shared a connection, as his clients of Roy Cohn. Cohn was close to Lauder’s mother, Estee Lauder (Josephine Mentzer). Estee was counted among Cohn’s most high-profile friends in his New York Times obituary

A window into the relationship surfaced in a 2016 article in Politico about a 1981 party at Cohn’s Greenwich home attended by Estee and Joe, as well as Trump and Ivana, who had a weekend home two miles away. That party was held soon after Cohn had helped Reagan secure the presidency and had reached the height of his political influence. Cohn offered toasts to Reagan and Senator for New York Alfonse D’Amato, who would later urge Ronald Lauder to run for political office.

In 1983, Ronald Lauder was appointed  as US Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for European and NATO Affairs. Soon after his appointment, he served on the Dinner Tribute Committee for the pro-Israel organization B’nai B’rith, the parent organization of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), in Roy Cohn’s honor

Roy Cohn’s father, Albert was president of B’nai B’rith’s New England-New York chapter and Roy Cohn was a member of B’nai B’rith’s Banking and Finance Lodge.

The dinner specifically sought to honor Cohn for his pro-Israel advocacy. Its honorary chairmen included Rupert Murdoch, Donald Trump and Bear Stearns Alan Greenberg, all of whom are connected to Jeffrey Epstein

As deputy assistant secretary, Lauder was very active in Israeli politics and an ally of the Israeli representative to the UN Benjamin Netanyahu

Lauder would be one of the most important individuals in Netanyahu’s rise to power in 1996, and a major financier of the Likud Party

In 1986, the year Cohn died, Lauder became U.S. ambassador to Austria.

Lauder’s interest in Austrian politics has continued into recent years, with accusations that he sought to manipulate Austrian elections in 2012.

After leaving his ambassadorship, Lauder founded the Ronald S. Lauder Foundation in 1987 and ran for Mayor of NY against Giuliani in 1989. Lauder was encouraged to run by Alfonse D’Amato, who had close ties to Roy Cohn and Tom Bolan, who was D’Amato’s adviser

At the 1983 B’nai B’rith dinner for Cohn, D’Amato was the featured speaker.

A few years later, in the early 1990s, Lauder would join a newly formed group that has recently become of interest in connection with Jeffrey Epstein: the Mega Group.

A finding reported by Edward Szall: When police discovered an Austrian passport with Epstein’s picture and fake name in his Manhattan residence, according to the Associated Press, Epstein’s lawyers argued “a friend [who’s name was not disclosed] gave it to him in the 1980s after Jewish-Americans were advised to carry identification bearing a non-Jewish name” This claim appears related to concerns following the hijacking of Air France Flight 139 in 1976 when Israeli and Jewish hostages were separated from other hostages based largely on their passports.

The passport lists him as a resident of Saudi Arabia and fluency in German. Not a resident of Austria, the only way to have acquired it was through assistance from a well-connected Austrian official or foreign diplomat with clout in Austria.

Lauder, then-ambassador to Austria for the Reagan administration. The passport was issued in 1987, when Lauder was serving as ambassador.

In addition, Lauder was well-connected to Epstein’s former patron — former head of Bear Stearns’ Alan Greenberg, who had hired Epstein in the late 1970s immediately after the latter was fired from the Dalton School — and 

Donald Trumpanother friend of 

Lauder and Greenberg who began his friendship with 

Epstein 

in 1987

the same year the fake Austrian passport was issued

In 1987, Epstein also began his relationship with his principal financier, 

Leslie Wexner, who is also closely associated with 

Ronald Lauder

Furthermore, Epstein and the Mega Group’s ties to Mossad, also suggest Lauder particularly in light of his close ties to Israeli government and that Mossad has a history of using ambassadors to procure fake passports for its operatives. 

Lauder himself has been alleged to have ties to Mossad, as he is a long-time funder of IDC Herzliya, an Israeli university closely associated with Mossad and Israeli military intelligence. Lauder founded IDC Herzliya’s Lauder School of Government, Diplomacy and Strategy. 

Lauder co-founded the Eastern European broadcasting network CETV with Mark Palmer, a former U.S. diplomat, Kissinger aide and Reagan speechwriter

Palmer co-founded the National Endowment for Democracy (NED), often described as an accessory to U.S. intelligence, and one whose first president confessed to the Washington Post that “a lot of what we do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA.” 

A 2001 report in the Evening Standard noted that Epstein once claimed  he worked for the CIA during the 1980s but later backed away from that assertion.

The Mega Group

The Mega Group — a secretive group to which Lauder belongs — was formed in 1991 by Charles Bronfman and Epstein patron Leslie WexnerMedia profiles of the group paint it as “a loosely organized club of 20 [wealthy and] influential Jewish businessmen” focused on “philanthropy and Jewishness,” 

Several of its prominent members have ties to organized crime.

Mega Group members are closely associated with well-known pro-Israel organizations. Charles Bronfman and Michael Steinhardt formed Birthright Taglit with the backing of Benjamin Netanyahu. 

Steinhardt, an atheist, has stated his motivation was to advance his own belief that devotion to the state of Israel should serve as “a substitute for [Jewish] theology.” 

 Other well-known groups associated with the Mega Group include the World Jewish Congress — whose past president, Edgar Bronfman, and current president, Ronald Lauder, are both Mega Group members — and B’nai B’rith, particularly its spin-off known as the Anti-Defamation League (ADL). The Bronfman brothers were major donors to the ADL, with Edgar Bronfman serving as the ADL’s honorary national vice-chair for several years.

Shimon Peres listens to Edgar Bronfman during a 1995 lunch in Peres’ honor. David Karp | AP

Other Mega Group members that are donors the ADL include Ronald LauderMichael Steinhardt and the late Max Fisher. As previously mentioned, Roy Cohn’s father was a leader of B’nai B’rith’s New England-New York chapter and Cohn was later a celebrated member of its banking and finance lodge.

Max Fisher of the Mega Group founded the National Jewish Coalition, now the Republican Jewish Coalition — the main pro-Israel neocon lobby, known for supporting of hawkish policies, whose current patrons, 

Sheldon Adelson and Bernard Marcus, are 

Trump’s top donors.

The use of “philanthropy” to provide cover for more unscrupulous lobbying or business activities was pioneered decades earlier by Sam Bronfman, the father of Mega Group’s Edgar and Charles Bronfman

Sam Bronfman’s ambition was to become a respected member of high society and worked hard to remove his reputation of mob associations. By the end of the 1930s, he was head of the Canadian Jewish Congress.

Sam Bronfman’s philanthropy still had hints of the mobster reputation. He was actively involved in shipping arms to Zionist paramilitaries in Palestine prior to 1948, as a co-founder of the National Conference for Israeli and Jewish Rehabilitation that smuggled weapons to Haganah

Bronfman’s associates in the criminal underworld were doing the same. Close aides of David Ben-Gurion, first Israeli prime minister, instrumental in founding Mossadforged tight relations with Meyer Lansky, and “Bugsy” Siegel, who smuggled arms to the Haganah and the Irgun

These gangsters were also strengthening ties to U.S. intelligence first established in World War II. 

After Israel was founded, Sam Bronfman worked with Shimon Peres to negotiate Canadian armaments paid for by a fundraising dinner hosted by Bronfman. Years later, Peres would introduce  Ehud Barak, to Jeffrey Epstein.

Bronfman family’s march on “the road to respectability” was continued by Sam’s children, who married into

the Rothschilds, the 

Lehmans, and the 

Loebs

Edgar and Charles Bronfman were not the only Mega Group members with deep and long-standing ties to the 

Lansky Syndicate

Mega Group’s Michael Steinhardt, wrote about his family ties to Lansky in his autobiography No Bull: My Life in and out the Markets. His father, 

Sol “Red McGee” Steinhardt, was 

Lansky’s jewel fence of choice and a major player in New York’s underworld. 

Sol Steinhardt was his son’s first client on Wall Street and helped him jumpstart his career in finance.

Another Mega Group member with

Meyer Lansky ties, via Abe Bernstein, is

Max Fisher, who has been described as 

Leslie Wexner’s mentor 

and alleged to have worked with Detroit’s “Purple Gang”, part of the Bronfman Canada-US liquor smuggling network during Prohibition. 

Max Fisher was a key adviser to several presidents, beginning with Eisenhower, as well as to Henry Kissinger.

Mega Group member Steven Spielberg, is a well-known protege of Lew Wasserman, the mob-connected media mogul and long-time backer of Ronald Reagan’s film and later political career (Part II).

One surprise connection to Cohn involves Mega Group member, president of U.S. weapons firm General Dynamics, Lester Crown, whose brother-in-law is David Schine, Cohn’s confidant and alleged lover during the McCarthy hearings.

Another Mega Group member is Laurence Tisch. 

Tisch owned CBS News for several years and founded Loews. 

Tisch alsoworked for the OSS, where Donald Barr, who hired Epstein at the Dalton School, also served and which forged ties with Lansky during World War II. 

Wexner’s mansions and the Shapiro murder

Leslie “Les” Wexner, the other Mega Group co-founder, also has ties to organized crime. Wexner was the only client of Epstein’s hedge fund, the source of much of this wealth, and the previous owner of Epstein’s $56 million Manhattan townhouse, which Wexner transferred to an Epstein-controlled entity for free

Before Epstein received the townhouse, the Wexner-owned residence, according to the NYT in 1996, included  “a bathroom … hidden beneath a stairway, lined with lead …and supplied with closed-circuit television screens and a telephone, concealed in a cabinet beneath the sink.” 

The same article noted that, after Wexner bought the residence for $13.2 million in 1989, he spent millions more decorating and furnishing the home, including the electronic equipment in the bathroom, and never lived in it. The Times, interviewed Epstein who lived at the house, and identified him as Wexner’s “protege [and financial adviser]”.

That same year, Epstein was commissioning artwork for Wexner’s Ohio mansion. A recent article from the Times noted that: 

“… Maria Farmer was working on an art project for Epstein in Wexner’s Ohio mansion. … Epstein sexually assaulted her, according to an affidavit …filed … in federal court in Manhattan. … she fled the room and called the police, but that Wexner’s security staff refused to let her leave for 12 hours.”

Farmer’s account strongly suggests that, given the behavior of his …security staff …, 

Wexner was well aware of Epstein’s predatory behavior …. This is compounded by claims…by

Alan Dershowitz — a former lawyer for and friend of Epstein’s, who has also been accused of raping underage girls

— that Wexnerhas also been accused of raping underage girls exploited by Epstein….

Wexner has developed a respectable public image like other members of the Mega Group but the electronic equipment in his bathroom suggests there is more to Wexner

In 1985, Columbus (Ohio) lawyer Arthur Shapiro was murdered in broad daylight at point-blank range in a “mob style murder.” The homicide remains unsolved, likely because Police Chief James Jackson ordered the destruction of key documents of investigation into the murder.

The documents’ destruction came to light in 1996 when Jackson was investigated for corruption. According to the Columbus Dispatch, Jackson justified the destruction of one “viable and valuable” report because it was so filled with wild speculation about prominent business leaders that it was potentially libelous.” The nature of this “wild speculation” was that “millionaire businessmen in Columbus and Youngstown were linked to the ‘mob-style murder.’

The report was eventually obtained by Bob Fitrakis — attorney, journalist after he was “accidentally” sent a copy of the report in 1998 as part of a public records request.

The report, titled “Shapiro Homicide Investigation: Analysis and Hypothesis,” names Leslie Wexner as linked “with associates reputed to be organized crime figures” and others as also being involved in Shapiro’s murder

The report also noted that Arthur Shapiro’s law firm represented Wexner’s company, The Limited. It also noted that Shapiro was the subject of an investigation by the IRS because he failed to file income tax returns and invested in questionable tax shelters. It stated that 

his death prevented Shapiro from testimony at a grand jury about the tax shelters.

The report focuses on the close relationship between The Limited and Francis Walsh, whose trucking company [had] done 90 percent of the Limited’s trucking around the time of Shapiro’s murder

Walsh was named in a 1988 indictment as a “co-conspirator” of Genovese crime family boss Anthony “Fat Tony” Salerno, whose long-time lawyer was 

Roy Cohn

and the Shapiro murder report stated that Walsh was “still considered associates of the Genovese/LaRocca crime family, and Walsh was still providing truck transportation for The Limited.” 

The Genovese crime family has long been a part of the “Lucky” Luciano – Meyer Lansky National Crime Syndicate. 

The “Mega” Mystery and the Mossad

In May 1997, the Washington Post broke an explosive story —based on an intercepted phone call between a Mossad official in the U.S. and his superior in Tel Aviv that discussed the Mossad’s efforts to obtain a secret U.S. government document. The Mossad official stated during the call that “Israeli Ambassador Eliahu Ben Elissar had asked him whether he could obtain a copy of the letter given to Yasser Arafat by Warren Christopher on Jan. 16, the day after the Hebron accord was signed by Arafat and Netanyahu.”

The Post article continued: 

[In] the NSA transcript of the conversation, the intelligence officer… said, 

‘The ambassador wants me to go to Mega to get a copy of this letter.’ … the supervisor in Tel Aviv rejected the request, saying, 

‘This is not something we use Mega for.’”

Mossad later claimed that “Mega” was merely a codeword for the U.S.’ CIA, but the FBI and NSA were unconvinced and believed that it was a senior U.S. official involved with Jonathan Pollard, the U.S. naval intelligence analyst convicted of spying for the Mossad

Almost one year to the day later the Wall Street Journal  reported on the existence of an “informal” organization of billionaires called the Mega Group founded years prior in 1991. The report made no mention of the spy scandal of only a year prior. 

However, the group’s distinctive “informal” name and its connections to the Mossad and Israeli prime ministers, raise the possibility that “Mega” was not an individual, but a group.

In 1997, when the “Mega” spy scandal broke, Netanyahu had recently become prime minister, a victory that was largely credited to Netanyahu donor, Ronald Lauder. Netanyahu personally enlisted Lauder and George Nader to serve as his peace envoys to Syria.

Nader was recently hit with 

child sex trafficking charges 

last month, soon after Jeffrey Epstein had been arrested on similar charges. 

At the time Nader was picked to work with Lauder for Netanyahu, he had already been caught possessing 

child pornography in 1984 and 1990.

This strong connection between Netanyahu and Lauder during the time of the 1997 “Mega” spy scandal is important considering Mossad answers directly to Israel’s prime minister. 

Also-

Meyer Lansky collaborated at least once  with Mossad “superspy” Rafi Eitan. Eitan was the Mossad handler of Jonathan Pollard. Eitan was the main source that “Mega” referred to the CIA and not a source in the U.S. government linked to Pollard, 

making Eitan’s claims as to the meaning of “Mega” dubious.

Given the organized crime network tied to the Mega Group had ties to U.S. and Israeli intelligence, “Mega” could plausibly have referred to the Mega Group

More evidence comes from the fact that Mega Group members were business partners of Mossad agents

Robert Maxwell 

and Marc Rich.

The Mysterious Maxwells

Ghislaine Maxwell, has been cited by Jeffery Epstein’s victims, and former wives of Epstein’s friends, as Epstein’s “pimp” who procured underage girls for his sexual blackmail operation and alleged to have engaged in the rape of the girls used them in child pornography

Ghislaine was the favorite and youngest daughter of Robert Maxwell. After World War II, according to authors John Loftus and Mark Aarons, he greatly influenced the Czechoslovakian government 

to arm Zionist paramilitaries during the 1948 war that resulted in Israel’s creation as a state

and Maxwell himself was also involved in the smuggling of aircraft parts to Israel. 

Around this time, Maxwell was approached by MI6 and offered a position that Maxwell declined. MI6 classified him as “Zionist — loyal only to Israel” and made him a person of interest. 

He became an agent of the Mossad, according to 

Robert Maxwell: Israel’s Superspy by Gordon Thomas and Martin Dillon. 

The Samson Option: Israel’s Nuclear Arsenal and American Foreign Policy by Seymour Hersh 

According to Victor Ostrovsky, a former Mossad officer: 

Maxwell purchasedthe Mirror Newspaper Groupwith money lent to him by Mossad.

Mossad financedmany operations in Europewith money stolen from the Mirror pension fund. 

In exchange for his services, the Mossad provided him with prostitutes during his visits to Israel. It was later revealed the hotel was bugged with cameras, allowing the Mossad to acquire footage. As with the CIA, the Mossad’s use of blackmail is well-documented and extensive.

Maxwell was also a close associate of Israeli “superspy” Rafi Eitan, Jonathan Pollard’s handler and who worked directly with Meyer Lansky

Eitan had learned of a software used by the U.S. government called “Promis” from Earl Brian, associate and aide to Ronald Reagan

Promis (often considered the forerunner to “Prism”) was developed by William Hamilton, and to the U.S. government through his company, Inslaw, in 1982.

According to author Gordon Thomas, Brian was angry that the DOJ was using Promis to go after organized crime and money-laundering activities and Eitan felt that the program could aid Israel. Eitan was the director of the now defunct Israeli military intelligence agency Lekem

A plan was hatched to install a “trapdoor” then market Promis throughout the world, providing the Mossad with intelligence on its enemies and provide Eitan and Brian with copious amounts of cash

The CIA was said to have installed its own trapdoor in the software.

The problem became selling the bugged software to governments private companies. Brian first attempted to buy out Inslaw. 

Unsuccessful, Brian turned to his friend, Attorney General 

Ed Meese 

whose Justice Department thenrefused to make the payments to Inslaw stipulated by contract. 

Meese’s role in that decision may have been shaped, not only by his friendship with Brian, but that Meese’s wife was a major investor in Brian’s business ventures. 

Meese would later become an adviser to Donald Trump 

Inslaw was forced to declare bankruptcy as a result of Meese’s actions

Eitan then recruited Robert Maxwell to become a Promis salesman, which he did well, even to Soviet intelligence and conspiring with  Senator John Tower to have the software adopted at Los Alamos

Dozens of countries used the software on their most carefully guarded systems.

The widespread adoption of Promis through Earl Brian and Robert Maxwell

gave the Mossad a way to gather troves of counterintelligence and 

blackmail on other intelligence agencies and powerful figures. 

Promis’ backdoor provided the Mossad with access to blackmail the CIA and FBI had acquired over half a century

Strangely, in recent years, 

the FBI has sought to hide information related to Robert Maxwell’s connection to the Promis scandal.

Mordechai Vanunu

According to journalist Robert Fisk, Maxwell involved in the Mossad abduction of Mordechai Vanunu who had attempted to blow the whistle on Israel’s nuclear weapons program which was eventually published by the Sunday Times of London

Vanunu had also contacted the Maxwell owned Daily Mirror whose foreign editor was a close Maxwell associate and alleged Mossad asset, Nicholas Davies. 

Per Fisk, Maxwell ratted Vanunu to the Israeli Embassy in London. 

This led to Vanunu’s “honey trap” entrapment by a female Mossad agent and subsequent kidnapping and imprisonment in Israel. 

Vanunu served an 18-year sentence, 12 years of which were in solitary confinement.

Robert Maxwell’s death:

Then, there is the issue of Robert Maxwell’s death on his yacht, The Lady Ghislaine in 1991, widely cited as suspicious and a potential homicide. According Thomas and Dillon, Maxwell became more of a liability than an asset when he threated top Mossad officials with exposure of certain operations if they did not help rescue his media empire from debt and financial difficulties. Many Maxwell creditors, were Israeli, and alleged Mossad-connected. 

On the other extreme are theories that suggest Maxwell committed suicide because of the financial difficulties his empire faced.

Maxwell’s funeral was attended six heads of Israeli intelligence

Yitzhak Shamir stated: “He has done more for Israel than can today be said.” Other eulogies were given by Prime Ministers Ehud Olmert and Shimon Peres.

Swimming in the same swamp

In 1989 Maxwell and Charles Bronfman partnered up to bid on the Jerusalem Post. 

A year prior, Maxwell and Bronfman had become top shareholders in the Israeli pharmaceutical company Teva

In May 1989, Maxwell hosted a party on his yacht, the Lady Ghislaine.  

Attendees included Roy Cohn protege Donald Trump and Cohn’s law partner 

Tom Bolan

Mike Wallace, literary agent 

Mort Janklow, who represented Ronald Reagan and two of Cohn’s friends 

William Safire and 

Barbara Walters.

The CEO of what would soon become 

Time Warner, Steve Ross, who had built his business empire largely through his association with New York crime lord Abner “Longy” Zwillman who was a close friend of Meyer Lansky, Sol Steinhardt, and Sam Bronfman.

Another attendee was Secretary of the Navy and 

Kissinger staffer John Lehman, who was associated with 

Project for a New American Century. 

Prior to being SON, Lehman was president of the Abington Corporation, which hired Richard Perle to manage the portfolio of Israeli arms dealers Shlomo Zabludowicz and son Chaim, who paid Abington $10,000 month. 

A scandal arose when payments continued after both Lehman and Perle joined the Reagan Department of Defense and Perle was working to persuade the Pentagon to buy arms from companies linked to Zabludowicz. 

Another Kissinger staffer at Maxwell’s party was 

Thomas Pickering who played a minor role in Iran-Contra and, at the time of the party, was ambassador to Israel

Senator John Tower who allegedly conspired with Maxwell in the Mossad-bugged Promis software at Los Alamos was also present. 

Tower died just months before Maxwell in a suspicious plane crash.

Ghislaine Maxwell was also at the party.

After her father’s mysterious death on the same yacht that bears her name in 1991, Ghislaine Maxwell quickly moved to New York City. There, she met Jeffrey Epstein and, developed close ties to the Clintons 

Jeffrey Epstein and the new “Promis”

After it was revealed that Epstein had evaded stricter sentencing in 2008 because he “belonged to intelligence”, it was the ties of Ghislaine Maxwell that have led to speculation that Epstein’s sexual blackmail operation was sharing incriminating information with the Mossad

Former CBS executive producer and current journalist Narativ, Zev Shalev, has since claimed that he independently confirmed Epstein was tied directly to the Mossad

Epstein was a long-time friend of Ehud Barak, who has long-standing ties to Israeli intelligence

Barak is also close to Epstein patron and Mega Group member Leslie Wexner, whose foundation gave Barak $2 million in 2004 for a still unspecified research program

Barak was first introduced to Epstein by Shimon Peres, who eulogized Robert Maxwell and had decades-long ties with the Bronfman family going back to the early 1950s. 

Peres was a frequent participant in programs funded by Wexner and worked closely with the Mossad for decades.

In 2015, Barak formed a company with Epstein invest in an Israeli start-up then known as Reporty, now Carbyne which sells software to 911 call centers and is also available to consumers as an app that provides emergency services with access to a caller’s camera and location and runs any caller’s identity through any linked government database. 

It has been marketed by the company and the Israeli press as

a solution to mass shootings in the US and is used by at least two U.S. counties.

Epstein and Barak are among the company’s largest investors. 

It was recently revealed  that a significant amount of Barak’s investments in Carbyne was funded by Epstein. 

Barak is now Carbyne’s chairman

The company’s executive team are all former members of Israeli intelligence, including 

Unit 8200, that is often likened to the NSA. 

Carbyne’s CEO, Amir Elichai, served in Unit 8200 and tapped Pinchas Buchris. Another Carbyne co-founder, Lital Leshem, also served in Unit 8200 and later worked for Israeli private spy company Black Cube. Leshem now works for a subsidiary of Erik Prince’s company Frontier Services Group, according to the independent media outlet Narativ

The company also includes tie-ins to the Trump administration, including Palantir founder and Trump ally Peter Thiel — an investor in Carbyne. In addition, Carbyne’s board of advisers includes former Palantir employee Trae Stephens, who was a member of the Trump transition team, as well as Michael Chertoff

Narativ, noted that the Chinese government uses a smartphone app 

very similar to Carbyne

The Chinese Carbyne-equivalent 

“monitors every aspect of a user’s life, including personal conversations, power usage, and tracks a user’s movement.”

Given the history of Robert Maxwell — the father of Epstein’s long-time “girlfriend” and young-girl-procuring madam, Ghislaine Maxwell — in promoting the sale of Israel’s modified Promis software, which was also marketed as a tool to improve government efficacy but was actually a tool of mass surveillance for the benefit of Israeli intelligence, 

the overlap between Carbyne and Promis is troubling and warrants further investigation.

Many Unit 8200-connected tech start-ups are being widely integrated into U.S. companies and have developed close ties to the U.S. military-industrial complex.

As MintPress previously reported, Unit 8200-linked outfits like Team8 have recently hired former NSA Director Mike Rogers as a senior advisor and gained prominent Silicon Valley figures, including Eric Schmidt, as investors. 

Many American technology companies, like Intel, Google and Microsoft, have merged with several Unit 8200-connected start-ups and moved jobs and operations to Israel with backing from key Republican donors like Paul Singer

Many of those same companies, particularly Google and Microsoft, are also 

major U.S. government contractors.

Iran Contra, Mena Airport and the Clintons

While Bill Clinton was governor of Arkansas, Under the close watch of the CIA, led by William Casey, the Mena Airport was used to stockpile and deliver arms and ammunition to the Nicaraguan Contras

The arms were exchanged for cocaine from South American cartels, sent back to Mena 

to fund the operation. 

Clinton’s direct intervention suggests he had some sort of personal stake in the major smuggling operation taking place in his state. 

Clinton split with many other state governments and sent a contingency of the Arkansas National Guard to Honduras to train the Contras on how to overthrow the Sandinista government. 

Clinton also discussed his first-hand knowledge of the operation with William Barr.

Much of this channeling weapons and drugs was carried out by alleged CIA/DEA operative Barry Seal. According to the book Whiteout: the CIA, Drugs and the Press by Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair:

A federal investigation aided by the Arkansas State Police established that Barry Seal, a drug dealer working for the Medellin cartel as well as with the C.I.A. and the D.E.A., had his planes retrofitted at Mena for drug drops, trained pilots there and laundered his profits partly through financial institutions in Arkansas. Seal, at this time was in close contact with [Oliver] North, who acknowledged the relationship in his memoir. These were the years in which North was constructing his covert supply lines for the contras.”

Seal used aircraft and crews from Southern Air Transport, formerly Air America which was 

once directly owned by the CIA. 

Less known is the relationship between the CIA-linked airline and Leslie Wexner and Jeffrey Epstein.

In his 1999, Cross-fire: Witness in the Clinton Investigation,

former Arkansas cop turned personal driver/security guard for Bill Clinton, L.D. Brown, recounts how 

Clinton encouraged him to apply at the CIA

Clinton allegedly edited Brown’s application essay

The topic was drug smuggling in Central America

The CIA put Brown in touch with Barry Seal

Seal was later gunned down in 1986 while serving six-months probation for drug-smuggling charges.

Terry Reed, who had also worked for Oliver North since 1983, claimed to have been put in touch with Seal by North and 

established a base 10 miles north of Mena — where Contras and other recruits from were trained in resupply, night landings, paradrops and similar, “according to Cockburn and St. Clair. Reed asserted drug money was being 

laundered through Arkansas financial institutions.

After Clinton’s half-brother Roger Clinton was busted for cocaine smuggling 

Clinton would later pardon him while president 

the CIA sought to move Contra operations out of Arkansas, hoping to put a damper on the increasingly public and sloppy Arkansas-based operation. According to Terry Reed in his book Compromised: Clinton, Bush and the CIA, co-written with John Cummings, a hushed meeting was held in a bunker at Camp Robinson in North Little Rock, Arkansas. During the meeting,

William Barr, who represented himself as the emissary of then-CIA Director

Bill Casey told Clinton:

The deal we made was to launder our money through your bond business but what we didn’t plan on was you and your n****r here start taking yourselves seriously and purposely shrinking our laundry.”

Bar chastised Clinton for his sloppy handling of the delicate operation and his half-brother’s very public fall from grace. He would later tell Clinton, according to Reed

Bill, you are Mr. Casey’s fair-haired boy … You and your state have been our greatest asset. Mr. Casey wanted me to pass on to you that unless you fuck up and do something stupid, you’re No. 1 on the short list for a shot at the job that you’ve always wanted. You and guys like you are the fathers of the new government. We are the new covenant.”

Attempts to investigate Clinton’s role in Iran-Contra were allegedly axed by Clinton’s own confidantes. According to the Wall Street Journal

nine separate state and federal probes into the affair, 

all failed.

Former IRS investigator William Duncan would later say, “[They] were interfered with and covered up, a 1992 memo  to high-ranking attorney general staff notes Duncanwas 

instructed “to remove all files concerning the Mena investigation from the attorney general’s office.” The attorney general, serving under 

George H.W. Bushat that time was 

William Barr, who is currently attorney general under Trump.

The Bank of Crooks and Criminals International

Another Clinton connection to the CIA and Iran-Contra runs through Arkansas financier Jackson Stephens and the CIA-linked  BCCI bank. 

Stephens was a major donor of Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. He also played a key role in the rise of

Walmart.

Jackson Stephens and his family bankrolled Bill Clinton, both gubernatorial and presidential campaigns. Majority Stephens -owned Worthen Bank provided Clinton’s first presidential campaign a $3.5 million line of credit. Stephens’ businesses were represented by the Rose Law Firm, where Hillary was a partner.

redacted FBI report from 1998 describes Stephens as having “lengthy and continuing ties to the Clinton administration and associates” and also discusses allegations that Stephens has been involved in the “illegal handling of campaign contributions to the Democratic National Party.”

BCCI was founded by a group of bankers from Pakistan, though Newsweek later reported 

CIA encouraged

Agha Hasan Abedi

to establish the bank to provide cover for intelligence operations. 

CIA documents that later surfaced during congressional hearings stated that BCCI was directly involved in “money laundering, 

narco-financing, 

…gun running for 

terrorist groups.”

Evidence in the case against BCCI shows cocaine seized from a warehouse and suitcases full of cash to be laundered. Photo | FLMD District Court

Catherine Austin Fitts — former Assistant Secretary for Housing–Federal Housing Commissioner at HUD during the George H.W. Bush administration, and investment banker with the firms Hamilton Securities Group and Dillon, Read & Co. — believes that those links went well beyond the CIA

Fitts — who was placed on the board of the BCCI subsidiary 

First American Bank following BCCI’s collapse — told MintPress that, after reading through troves of documents regarding the bank’s activities prior to its implosion, it was clear to her that there was 

“no way” its activities were carried on without the full knowledge of the 

Federal Reserve, Bank of New York, and the 

White House.

Adnan Khashoggi, a key figure and intermediary in the scandal, used one BCCI account to move more than 

$20 million related to illegal arms sales and BCCI created fake documentation, including checks signed by Oliver North, allowing the sale to go forward. The bank later claimed it had no records of these transactions.

BCCI appears to have been involved in the sex trafficking of underage girls, including girls that had not yet reached puberty

According to “The BCCI Affair,” by Senators John Kerry (D-MA) and Hank Brown (R-CO), 

BCCI officials were alleged to have 

obtained leverage with powerful individuals, including prominent members of 

the ruling families of the UAE, by providing them with 

young virgins and males to homosexual VIPs.”

BCCI was largely brought into the US business community through Jackson Stephens and Bert Lance, former budget director for Jimmy Carter, 

who assisted with BCCI’s acquisition of 

First American Bank

The law firm involved in this effort was Arkansas’ 

Rose Law Firm and it involved several of the firm’s lawyers, including 

Hillary Rodham Clinton

Webster Hubbell and C.J. Giroir. 

Also involved in the effort was 

Clark Clifford, Secretary of Defense under LBJ, and 

Kamal Adham, former director general of Saudi intelligence.

Robert Keith Gray 

was added to the BCCI board after the acquisition of First American Bank according to Newsweek


Robert Keith Gray was deputy director of communications in Reagan’s 1980 campaign under William Casey, who later became CIA director.

Gray returned to the PR business, taking on several clients including

Adnan Khashoggi

and Marc Rich

Marc Rich, was a Mossad asset. 

Marc Rich’s pardon by Bill Clinton was largely orchestrated by Mega Group members Michael Steinhardt and Israeli politicians like

Ehud Barak.


A matter of months after Cohn’s death another individual became a central figure in the powerful Cohn had cultivated.

Jeffrey Epstein, would be recruited, after his firing from the Dalton School, by Alan “Ace” Greenberg, a close friend of Cohn, to work at

Bear Stearns.

After leaving Bear Stearns and working as a “financial bounty hunter” for clients like Iran-Contra-linked arms dealer 

Adnan Khashoggi,

Epstein would come into contact with Leslie Wexner, a billionaire close to the Meyer Lansky-linked Bronfman family, who himself was tied to members of the crime syndicates once represented by Cohn.


Gray used to say that 

before taking on a foreign client, 

he would clear it with William Casey.” 

Clinton connection to Promis

While the Rose Law Firm was assisting BCCI’s entrance into the American financial system, it also represented the 

Stephens-owned financial services company, Stephens Inc., as well as the data-processing company 

Systematics Inc., which 

Stephens acquired in the late 1960s. According to James Norman in his book The Oil Card: Global Economic Warfare in the 21st Century

Systematics was “a

front company for the [NSA] in the 1980s and early 1990s to market and implant bugged software in the world’s major money-center banks and clearinghouses as part of the Reagan/Bush ‘follow the money’ effort to break the Soviets.” 

The late journalist Michael Ruppert asserted that this 

“bugged software” was none other than the 

Promis software, 

 According to a 1995 document sent on behalf of Inslaw’s founders to Ken Starr

Systematics had “covertly implanted [software] into the computers of its bank customers” that allowed 

allied intelligence agencies to track the flow of money through the banking system 

and had done so at “the behest of the

NSA and Israeli intelligence.” 


Ed Meese’s Justice Department then refused to make the payments to Inslaw stipulated by contract. 

Meese’s role in that decision may have been shaped, not only by his friendship with Brian, but that Meese’s wife was a major investor in Brian’s business ventures. 

Meese would later become an adviser to Donald Trump 

Inslaw was forced to declare bankruptcy as a result of Meese’s actions

Eitan then recruited Robert Maxwell to become a Promis salesman, which he did well, even to Soviet intelligence and conspiring with  Senator John Tower to have the software adopted at Los Alamos

Dozens of countries used the software on their most carefully guarded systems.

The widespread adoption of Promis through Earl Brian and Robert Maxwell

gave the Mossad a way to gather troves of counterintelligence and 

blackmail on other intelligence agencies and powerful figures. 

Promis’ backdoor provided the Mossad with access to blackmail the CIA and FBI had acquired over half a century

the FBI has sought to hide information related to Robert Maxwell’s connection to the Promis scandal.


Inslaw also stated that the software was used by these same intelligence agencies in the 

“laundering of money, especially drug profits.”

Systematics had a subsidiary in Israel that was 

operated by contractors for the Mossad and 

sold software to banks and telecommunications companies. 

Two partners in the Rose Law Firm also in in the Clinton administration, 

Vince Foster and 

Webster Hubbell,

acquired significant financial interests in Systematics through ownership in 

Alltel, which purchased Systematics in the early 1990s. 

The Hamiltons (William Hamilton?) provide evidence that

Foster’s distress prior to his death in 1993 appears related to 

concerns about litigation over Systematics and Promistheft.

BCCI was known to employ the Promis software after its theft by the DOJ;

and one of its subsidiaries, First American Bank, also “filtered PROMIS money” — i.e., laundered the money generated from the sale of the stolen Promis software — 

according to the late Danny Casolaro

Casolaro had been investigating

the Octopus” at the time of his death in 1991. Powerful individuals private, public, & criminal underworld were collectively responsible for 

Iran-Contra

BCCI and the theft of the 

Promis software. 

Casolaro told friends and family that he was close to concluding his investigation and several people had seen documents involving BCCI and World Bank money transfers to people such as 

Earl Brian and 

Adnan Khashoggi

Casolaro went to Martinsburg, VA to meet with sources to 

“bring back the head of the Octopus.” Two days after arriving he was

found dead in his hotel room and his 

briefcase with research and evidence was missing. 

His death was ruled a suicide.

A week before his death, Casolaro told his brother he had been receiving death threats and the deep slashes in his arms, were not consistent with Casolaro’s well-known squeamishness around even minor amounts of blood

followingthe FBI investigation, the FBI 

lied to Congress

pressured agents not to question whether it was a suicide and 

lost 90 percent of its files.

In a 1994 letter provided to MintPress by Inslaw Inc., lawyer Charles Work told Assistant Attorney General 

John Dwyer that one of Inslaw’s confidential sources in government had stated that 

Casolaro had been injected with a substance that deadened his nerves from the neck down, explaining the apparent lack of struggle and that the substance (ethyl alcohol absolute) used had come from the U.S. Army inventory. 

The person who had arranged Casolaro’s final meeting was

U.S. military intelligence officer Joseph Cuellar.

there were several other suspicious deaths of people connected to the Promis scandal or Casolaro’s investigation the same year including

Alan Standorf, one of Casolaro’s sources; 

Robert Maxwell, father of Ghislaine Maxwell, Mossad operative, and salesman of the bugged Promis software; and

John Tower — the former Texas senator who assisted Maxwell in selling the bugged Promis software to Los Alamos 

Jeffrey Epstein and “The Dirtiest Bank of All”

Like Arkansas, often overlooked in Iran-Contra is the key role played by Israeli intelligence-linked arms dealers/smugglers, later connected to the Mega Group and 

Jeffrey Epstein, such as 

Marc Rich and 

At the time of his Iran-Contra dealings, 

Adnan Khashoggiwas working for 

Mossad, according to former agent 

Victor Ostrovsky

Ostrovsky, in “By Way of Deception,” notes that Khashoggi’s private jet had been fitted in Israel. 

Ostrovsky claims that 

Khashoggi provided a 

$5 million bridge loan to overcome the lack of trust between Israel and Iran. 

According to journalist Vicky Ward

Adnan Khashoggi was a client of 

Jeffrey Epstein’s not long after Epstein’s departure from Bear Stearns in 1981. Some former Bear employees claim he was fired, others including Epstein claimed he resigned. 

Ward suggests Epstein may have left due to an SEC insider trading investigation involving a tender offer placed by the Seagrams corporation for St. Joe Minerals Corp. 

Seagrams owner Edgar Bronfman, son of Meyer Lansky associate Samuel Bronfman and member of the Mega Group had tipped off several investors and bankers of the coming tender offer. 

Epstein resigned the day after the case opened. 

He claimed he left because of a result of a“Reg D” violation and rumors he had an “illicit affair with a secretary.” Yet, as Ward noted: The SEC never brought charges against anyone at Bear Stearns for insider trading,

but its questioning seems to indicate it was skeptical of Epstein’s answers

If he was such a big producer, why would he give it up over a $2,500 fine?

Immediately afterward “the details [of his work history] recede into shadow. 

In the early 1980s he used to tell friends he was a 

“bounty hunter,” which meant recovering lost/stolen money for the government or for very rich people. 

He has a license to carry a firearm.” 

Writing in Salon, a former friend of Epstein’s, Jesse Kornbluth, also stated that Epstein claimed to be a “bounty hunter” 

he worked for governments to recover money looted by African dictators. help dictators hide their stolen money.” (emphasis added)

One of Epstein’s clients per Ward’s sources, was 

CIA/Mossad-linked Khashoggi at the very time that Khashoggi was involved in 

Iran-Contra

Nigel Rosser reported in 2001 in the Evening Standard that 

Epstein claimed that he was working for the 

CIA during this time. 

Since Epstein’s arrest, 

records of Rosser’s article have been 

scrubbed from British newspaper archives

MintPress independently confirmed with Bob Fitrakis, whom Rosser interviewed for the article, it did allege Epstein claimed he worked for the CIA. Other reports from the time cited excerpts of Rosser’s article, including Epstein’s claims of CIA involvement.

Rosser’s article had included the following passage: 

He [Epstein] has a license to carry a concealed weapon, 

once claimed to have worked for the CIA

although he now denies it … 

Once he arrived at the London home of a British arms dealer bringing…

a New York police-issue pump-action riot gun

God knows how he got it into the country,’ a friend said.”

At the time of Rosser’s article, 

Mossad operative 

Robert Maxwell — 

also vehemently denied his links to Israeli intelligence until his death. 

Epstein and his only known billionaire “client,” 

Leslie Wexner, would later forge a business relationship with the 

CIA front company 

Southern Air Transport and play a major role in the airline’s relocation to Columbus, Ohio in the mid-1990s. During that period, two prominent Ohio officials believed that both 

Epstein and Wexner were working with the 

CIA, according to Ohio-based journalist Bob Fitrakis.

Epstein’s involvement with the CIA, and his time as a financial fixer for Khashoggi, suggest 

whatever he was doing likely involved 

BCCI.

According to “The BCCI Affair”, Khashoggi “acted as the middleman for five Iranian arms deals for the US, financing a number of them through BCCI” and “served as the ‘banker’ for arms shipments. 

This connection is even more likely given that 

Bear Stearns served as a broker to BCCI

A fact hidden until a court battle in the U.K. concluded in 2011, forcing the government’s “Sandstorm Report” about BCCI’s activities to unredact the names of Bear Stearns and other institutions, individuals and countries that had done business with the 

CIA front company, 

BCCI. 

BCCI and other organizations connected to 

Iran-Contra and several individuals close to the 

Reagan White House,trafficked 

underage girls for sex as a means of

obtaining favors and gaining leverage over powerful individuals 

through blackmail. 

Reagan CIA director 

Bill Casey, was a close friend of 

Roy Cohn, who ran the 

sexual blackmail operation involving 

underage boys out of Manhattan’s Plaza Hotel. 

According to Cohn’s long-time secretary Christine Seymour, 

Casey was one of Cohn’s most frequent callers.

Time Magazine-“BCCI: The Dirtiest Bank of All”

One of the arms dealers that 

Epstein knew well was 

Sir Douglas Leese

Leese was involved in brokering the first of a series of British arms deals that involved Khashoggi, the Al Yamamah Deal and allegedly involving bribery of 

Saudi royal family members and 

Saudi officials. In addition to Khashoggi, several of the officials and royal family members had 

deep ties to BCCI

Later iterations of that arms deal were allegedly brokered with the involvement of 

Prince Charles, and corruption investigations into Al Yamamah were later shut down by the efforts of 

Tony Blair as well as 

Prince Andrew

Leese is said tohave spoken of Epstein’s “genius” 

and lack of morals when he introduced him to 

Steve Hoffenberg 

of Tower Financial, who soon 

hired Epstein. 

Tower Financial, “one of the largest Ponzi schemes in American history”

imploded in 1993. 

Hoffenberg later asserted in court that 

Epstein had been 

intimately involved in Tower’s financial practices and had called Epstein the 

“architect of the scam.” However, despite Hoffenberg’s testimony and abundant evidence, 

Epstein’s name was mysteriously 

dropped from the case

Given that Epstein allegedly received his 

“sweetheart deal” in 2008 as a result of having 

“belonged to intelligence,” 

Epstein’s activities in the 80s and 90s suggest that his ability to avoid charges in relation to the Tower Financial Ponzi scheme may have been for similar reasons. 

In Part II , Nixon Attorney General, John Mitchell was a “friend” of Washington lobbyist Craig Spence. Spence, ran a sexual blackmail operation in D.C. involving underage boys and had taken some of those “call boys” on midnight tours of the White House arranged by National Security Adviser Donald Gregg. After his trafficking and exploitation of minors was exposed, Spence, died under mysterious circumstances. His death was quickly labeled a suicide, not unlike Jeffrey Epstein’s.

With Epstein and Wexner’s Help, “Spook Air” Finds a New Home

In Part III MintPress detailed Leslie Wexner’s ties to organized crime and the homicide of Columbus, lawyer Arthur Shapiro

Columbus police described the Shapiro murder as “a Mafia ‘hit’” 

and a suppressed police report implicated Wexner as being involved in or benefiting from Shapiro’s death, and having links to New York-based crime syndicates.

Also:

In 1995, Southern Air Transport (SAT) 

— relocated from Miami, Florida to Columbus, Ohio. First founded in the late 1940s, SAT from 1960 until 1973 

was directly owned by the 

CIA, using it as a cover for covert operations.

After 1973, all of its  owners would have CIA ties,

including James Bastian, a former lawyer for the CIA, who owned SAT at the time of its relocation to Ohio. SAT was intimately involved inIran-Contra , used to funnel weapons and drugs to and from the  Nicaraguan Contras under the guise of delivering “humanitarian aid,” while sending American weapons to Israel that were then sold to Iran in violation of the U.S. arms embargo. 

In 1986 alone, SAT transported from Texas to Israel 90 tons of TOW anti-tank missiles, which were then sold to Iran by Israel and Mossad-linked intermediaries like Saudi arms dealer Adnan Khashoggi.

Though the airline’s CIA links were well known, Leslie Wexner’s company,

The Limited,

sought to coax SAT to relocate its headquarters from Miami to Columbus in 1995. When Edmund James, president of James and Donohew Development Services, told the Columbus Dispatch in March 1995 that SAT was relocating to Columbus’ Rickenbacker airfield, he stated that “Southern Air’s new presence at Rickenbacker begins in April with two regularly scheduled 747 cargo flights a week from Hong Kong,” citing SAT President William Langton. “By fall, that could increase to four a week. Negotiations are underway for flights out of Rickenbacker to the Far East…Much of the Hong Kong-to-Rickenbacker cargo will be for The Limited,” Wexner’s clothing company. “This is a big story for central Ohio. It’s huge, actually,” James said at the time.

The day following the press conference, Brian Clancy, working as a cargo analyst with MergeGlobal Inc., told the Journal of Commerce that the reason for SAT’s relocation to Ohio was largely the result of the lucrative Hong Kong-to-Columbus route that SAT would run for Wexner’s company. Clancy specifically stated that the fact that “[The] Limited Inc., the nation’s largest retailer, is based in Columbus … undoubtedly contributed in large part to Southern Air’s decision.”

According to documents obtained by journalist Bob Fitrakis from the Rickenbacker Port Authority, 

Ohio’s government tried to sweeten the deal to bring SAT to Columbus to please powerful Ohio businessmen like Wexner. Orchestrated by 

Governor George Voinovich’s

then-Chief of Staff Paul Mifsud,  a package of several financial incentives was created,to lure the airline to  Ohio, described the “generous package as “including a 75 percent credit against its corporate tax liability for the next 10 years, a $5 million low-interest loan, and a $400,000 job-training grant.”

In 1996, then-SAT spokesman David Sweet had told Fitrakis that the CIA-linked airline moved to Columbus because “the deal was too good to turn down.” SAT promised Ohio’s government it would create 300 jobs in three years, it quickly 

laid off numerous workers and 

failed to construct the maintenance facility it had promised, even though it had already 

accepted $3.5 million. 

Ohio’s government declined to recoup the millions in dollars it loaned the company, even after it was alleged that $32 million in the bank account of Mary Bastian, the wife of SAT’s owner and CIA lawyer James Bastian, were actually company funds

On October 1, 1998, SAT filed for bankruptcy. 

CIA’s Inspector General published a report on SAT’s involvement in drug trafficking. 

In addition to Wexner the other main figures , key in SAT’s relocation to Ohio were 

Alan D. Fiers Jr., former chief of the CIA Central American Task Force, and

retAF MajGen Richard Secord, head of air logistics for Air America’s (later SAT) covert action in 

Laos between 1966 and 1968, (COIN connection?)

Secord was also the air logistics coordinator in the Contra resupply for Oliver North

Fiers was one of the key individuals involved in Iran-Contra who was pardoned by 

George H.W. Bush

with the assistance of then-Attorney General 

Bill Barr

Barr —currently attorney general under 

Trump,

top of the chain of command in the investigation of Epstein’s death in prison — has 

refused to recuse himself from the investigation into Epstein’s network and his recent death.

the then-president of SAT told the Columbus Dispatch that the airline was 

“no longer connected to the CIA.”

It was during this same time that Epstein had substantial control over Wexner’s finances; and, according to Fitrakis, Epstein ran logistics for Wexner operations, including 

The Limited.

As in the Arthur Shapiro murder file and in ties between SAT and The Limited,

much of The Limited’s logistics involved figures connected to 

organized crime and US intelligence. 

SAT was known for being a CIA front company prior to Wexner bringing it to Columbus, and that, only a few years prior, Epstein worked for intelligence-linked figures involved in Iran-Contra, such as 

Adnan Khashoggi. 

During this time, 

Epstein had begun living in the 

infamous New York penthouse,

first purchased by Wexner in 1989. Wexner had installed CCTV and recording equipment in a bathroom, and never lived there, as noted in Part III 

Bob Fitrakis told MintPress that at the time,

Epstein and Wexner’s involvement with SAT’s relocation to Ohio  caused suspicion. Fitrakis stated Ohio Inspector General David Strutz and Sheriff of Franklin County Earl Smith personally told him they believed

Epstein and Wexner were 

CIA. 

Catherine Austin Fitts — former investment banker and government official, who has extensively investigated the intersection of organized crime, black markets, Wall Street and the government in the U.S. economy was told by an

ex-CIA employee that 

Wexner was one of five key managers of organized crime cash

in the US.

Furthermore, many members of the Mega Group, which Wexner co-founded, had direct ties to the Lansky crime syndicate.

Marc Rich’s Pardon and Israel’s “Leverage” over Clinton


Several figures who heavily lobbied Clinton over the

Marc Rich pardon 

had ties to Epstein

who had ties to Israeli intelligence 

and Israeli intelligence-linked tech companies, as discussed in Part III . (important below)

Ehud Barak, a close friend and business associate of Epstein

and Shimon Peres

who introduced Barak to Epstein, were

the major players in convincing Clinton to pardon Marc Rich.


Marc Rich was a commodities trader and hedge fund manager best known for founding the commodity trading and mining giant Glencore

and for doing business with numerous dictatorships, often in violation of sanctions. He worked particularly closely with Israel and, according to HaaretzIn the years after the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the ensuing global Arab oil embargo, a period when nobody wanted to sell oil to Israel, for almost 20 years Rich was the main source of the country’s oil and energy needs.”  It was that trading on Israel’s behalf that would ultimately lead to Rich being charged in 1983 for violating the U.S. oil embargo on Iran by selling Iranian oil to Israel. Rich was also charged with tax evasion, wire fraud, racketeering and several other crimes.

Haaretz also noted that Rich’s businesses were 

“a source of funding for secret financial arrangements” 

and that “his worldwide offices frequently served 

Mossad agents…” 

The Rich Foundation — 

was run by the former Mossad agent Avner Azulay. 

Rich was also friendly with

Menachem Begin and 

Ehud Barak

and a frequent provider of “services” for 

Israeli intelligence, services he freely volunteered.

Rich fed information to U.S. intelligence but declined to give specifics. 

He did not want to tell with whom he cooperated within the U.S. authorities or which branch of the U.S. government he supplied with intelligence,” 

According to Rich’s biographer, Daniel Ammann, One clue as to the nature of Rich’s relationship to U.S. intelligence is his apparent ties to BCCI. “The BCCI Affair” report mentions Rich as a person to investigate in relation to the bank. 

Rich was also deeply tied to the Mega Group

as one of the main donors to Birthright Israel along with 

Charles Bronfman and 

Michael Steinhardt. 

Steinhardt was particularly close to Rich, first meeting the in the 1970s, then managing $3 million for Rich, Rich’s then-wife, and Rich’s father-in-law through his hedge fund. 

In the late 1990s, Steinhardt would enlist other Mega Group members, such as 

Edgar Bronfman, to settle the criminal charges against Rich, which eventually came to pass with Clinton’s pardon of Rich in 2001. 

It “reeked of payoff.” 

the New York Post noted in 2016, in the run-up to pardon 

Rich’s ex-wife donated $450,000 to the Clinton Library and “over $1 million to Democratic campaigns…” 

Rich hired high-powered lawyers with links to powerful individuals in the Democratic and Republican parties and the Clinton White House, including 

Jack Quinn, who was as general counsel to the 

Clinton administration and 

chief of staff to Al Gore.

Per Clinton’s own words , the main reason behind the Rich pardon was lobbying from Israeli intelligence, Israeli politicians and members of the Mega Group like Steinhardt, with the donations from Denise Rich and Quinn’s access to the president likely sweetening the deal.

the most ardent lobbyists were

Ehud Barak, 

Shimon Peres, 

Ehud Olmert, 

Israeli Foreign Minister Shlomo Ben-Ami 

Director of the Mossad Shabtai Shavit

According to Haaretz, Barak was heard shouting at the president. Former adviser to Barak, Eldad Yaniv, claimed that Barak shouted it was 

“important … from the financial aspect, [and] he helped the Mossad …”

The Israel lobbying had considerable help from 

Abe Foxman of the ADL

which was heavily funded by Mega Group members, including

Ronald Lauder and 

Edgar Bronfman.

Clinton’s pardon of Rich may have involved blackmail

Israel is known to have acquired phone conversations between Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. Benjamin Netanyahu told Clinton he had recordings during the Wye Plantation talks between Israel and Palestine in 1998. Netanyahu attempted to use them to get Clinton to pardon Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard,however CIA Director George Tenet threatened to resign if the pardon was given.

A year prior Gordon Thomas claimed Mossad had some 30 hours of phone-sex conversations between Lewinsky and Clinton and used them as leverage. A May 2000 report in Insight magazine claimed Israeli intelligence penetrated four White House telephone lines and relayed the conversations to Israel.

According to Carl Cameron’s December 2001 report

[Israeli telecommunications company

Amdocs helped Bell Atlantic install

new telephone lines in the White House in 1997…[and] a senior-level employee of

Amdocs had a separate T1 data phone line installed from his base outside of St. Louis that was connected directly to Israel… 

[I]nvestigators are looking into whether …the T1 line had …capacity to intercept phone calls from 

…other government offices. 

Sources …say FBI agents on the case 

sought an arrest warrant for the St. Louis employee but 

[Clinton] Justice Department officials quashed it.“

According to journalist Chris Ketcham:

[Both Amdocs and Verint Inc. (formerly Comverse Infosys)] are based in Israel – [which had cornered] the information technology market – and are heavily funded by the 

Israeli government, with connections to the 

Israeli military and 

Israeli intelligence

The companies’ own operations sources suggest they “have been 

infiltrated by freelance spies 

exploiting …trapdoors …and gathering data on Americans for transfer

to Israeli intelligence 

and … [to] organized crime…”

Given the extent of phone tapping and Netanyahu’s use of phone calls to pressure Clinton to pardon Pollard, it is reasonable to speculate that some other communications could have been used to push Clinton to pardon Rich. 

Epstein, the Clintons, and Marc Rich

Jeffery Epstein had developed ties with the Clinton administration in 1993 and 

expanded, in 1996

when Epstein’s blackmail operation was underway. 

Clinton would later fly on Epstein’s “Lolita Express,” and 

Later Epstein donated to the Clinton Foundation and claimed to 

play a key role in creation of the 

Clinton Global Initiative.

Epstein appeared to have connections with Marc Rich’s partners

Felix Posen ran Rich’s London operations and appears in Epstein’s book of contacts

Epstein’s offshore structured investment vehicle (SIV), 

Liquid Funding

has the same attorney and director as several Glencore entities:

Alex Erskine of the law firm Appleby

Although Erskine was connected to a total of 274 offshore entities at the time of the “Paradise Papers” leak in 2014. 

Catherine Austin Fitts told MintPress that it could suggest that 

Epstein’s Liquid Funding — 

40 percent of which had been owned by Bear Stearns, and 

which may have received a “secret” bail-out from the 

Federal Reserve

is part of the same 

shadow economy “syndicate” as 

Glencore.

This merits further investigation since Glencore is partially owned by Nathaniel Rothschild.

Nathaniel’s father, Jacob Rothschild

is on the board of advisers of Genie Energy

which includes Michael Steinhardt 

as well as several associates of Epstein

such as Bill Richardson and 

Larry Summers

Marc Rich had long-standing ties to the Rothschild family, going back to the early 1970s when he began commodity trading at Philipp Brothers.


After Epstein’s arrests in 2007 and 2019, 

media reports detailed links between Epstein and Clinton and claimed to be facilitated by Ghislaine Maxwell 

asserting they met after Clinton left office and, the pardon of Marc Rich. 

However, documents obtained from the 

Clinton presidential library reveal 

ties between Epstein and Clinton 

date back years earlier,

facilitated by powerful individuals 

who have largely evaded scrutiny 


One who has been largely overlooked is Nathaniel Rothschild’s cousin by marriage, 

Lynn Forester de Rothschild

who is a long-time associate of Jeffrey Epstein 

with considerable ties to the New York City

“Roy Cohn machine.” 

She has also long been connected to 

neoconservative 

Reagan era officials, 

the Lewis Rosenstiel/Roy Cohn network described in Part I and Part II of the Whiney Webb’s series, and 

the Mega Group, (Part III)

Lynn Forester de Rothschild became involved in 

Democratic Party politics in the late 1970s working on the 1976 campaign of 

hawkish Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY) 

alongside neocons like Elliott Abrams

who would play an important role in Iran-Contra and serve in the Trump State Department. 

She was also introduced to her second husband, 

Evelyn de Rothschild

by Henry Kissinger 

at a Bilderberg conference. 

Several of the individuals connected to the Mega Group 

and the Mossad-linked media mogul Robert Maxwell 

including Mark Palmer, Max Fisher and John Lehman were aides/ advisers to 

Henry Kissinger.

Before marrying into the Rothschild family in 2000, Lynn had been married to Andrew Stein, a major figure in NY (D) politics. Andrew’s brother, James Finkelstein, married Cathy Frank, granddaughter of Lewis Rosenstiel. Rosenstiel’s protege Roy Cohn was the lawyer for Cathy Frank and James Finkelstein. At their behest Cohn attempted to trick a nearly comatose Rosenstiel to into naming Cohn, Frank and Finkelstein the executors and trustees of his estate, valued at $75 million (more than $334 million in today’s dollars).

According to the New Yorker, Lynn Forester de Rothschild

requested “financial help” from Jeffrey Epstein in 1993 during her divorce from Andrew Stein.


Forester de Rothschild’s ties to the Mega Group: 

She is currently on the board of

Estee Lauder, founded and still owned by the family of Ronald Lauder, a former Reagan official, a family friend of Roy Cohn, and the alleged source of Epstein’s Austrian passport. 

She also partnered with Matthew Bronfman 

creating the investment advisory firm Bronfman E.L. Rothschild LP.


Forester de Rothschild introduced Epstein to Alan Dershowitz in 1996. 

Forester de Rothschild has been a major donor to Bill and Hillary Clinton since 1992, and 

spent the first night of her honeymoon in the Lincoln Bedroom at the White House. 

In a leaked email Clinton requested “penance”for asking Tony Blair to accompany Clinton on official business while she was secretary of state, preventing Blair from making a social visit to Forester de Rothschild’s home. Requesting forgiveness is not something Hillary Clinton is known for. 

In 1995, Forester de Rothschild, a member of Clinton’s National Information Infrastructure Advisory Council, wrote the following to then-President Clinton:

…It was a pleasure to see you recently … Using my fifteen seconds of access to discuss Jeffrey Epstein and currency stabilization…”

A potential lead on what that means may lie in the 

links of both Forester de Rothschild and Epstein 

to Deutsche Bank. 

Journalist Vicky Ward reported in 2003 that Epstein boasted of “skill at playing the currency markets ‘with very large sums of money’” and he appears to have done much of this through his relationship with Deutsche Bank. 

Forester de Rothschild served as an advisor to the 

Deutsche Bank Microfinance Consortium and is currently a board member of the 

Alfred Herrhausen Society of International Dialogue of Deutsche Bank.

The same year that Forester de Rothschild made the comments to Bill Clinton about Epstein, 

Epstein attended another Clinton fundraiser, hosted by Ron Perelman at his personal home, that was very exclusive, as 

the guest list included only 14 people.

George Stephanopoulos attended a dinner party hosted by Epstein at his infamous Manhattan townhouse in 2010 after Epstein’s release from prison for soliciting sex from a minor.

The evolution of the Epstein-Clinton relationship

Epstein donated $10,000 to the White House Historical Association and attended a Clinton donor reception alongside Ghislaine Maxwell as early as 1993. 

Bill Clinton’s long-time friend from college, 

A.Paul Prosperi, was the facilitator of that early relationship, as 

Prosperi had a decades-long relationship with Epstein and visited Epstein at least 20 times while he was in jail in 2008. 

Prosperi was intimately involved with the 1993 fundraiser 

The relationship between Epstein and Clinton continued after he left office in 2001. 

Clinton flew on the Lolita Express 26 times in the early 2000s according to flight logs. Clinton was accompanied by Secret Service on some flights but unaccompanied on others. 

One flight taken by Clinton was a lengthy trip to Africa

with Kevin Spacey, who has been accused of raping minors

Ghislaine Maxwell; and Ron Burkle, a billionaire friend of Clinton. 

Clinton requested Epstein make his jet available well in advance, with Doug Band as the intermediary.

Donald Trump, also a friend of Epstein, appears once on flight logs. 

Both Trump and Clinton visited Epstein’s private island, nicknamed “Orgy Island” and “Lolita Island.”

An Epstein-run foundation gave $25,000 to the Clinton Foundation

according to the 2006 filing tax return of Epstein’s former charity, the C.O.U.Q. Foundation. Epstein’s lawyers, Alan Dershowitz among them, claimed in 2007 that 

Epstein was “part of the original group that conceived the

Clinton Global Initiative.

 have been the bridge  

Politico reporting 

Clinton associate Doug Band was also reportedly friendly to Ghislaine Maxwell, appearing at a dinner party she hosted in 2005. 

Maxwell became close to Chelsea Clinton, vacationing with her in 2009 and attending her wedding. 

Maxwell was also associated with the 

Clinton Global Initiative at least up until 2013.

Other close Clinton associates had relationships with Jeffrey Epstein,

Mark Middleton, special assistant to Clinton Chief of Staff 

Mack McClarty. 

Middleton met with Epstein onat least three occasions in the White House during the early Clinton years. 

Clinton White House social secretary, 

Ann Stockappears in Epstein’s “little black book” 

as doesDoug Band“Bill Clinton’s bag carrier, body man, fixer, and all-purpose gatekeeper.” Band also appears several times in the flight logs of Epstein’s private jet.

Epstein was also associated with both 

Bill Richardson, Secretary of Energy andambassador to the UN 

Larry Summers, Secretary of the Treasury under Clinton. 

Both Richardson and Summers 

sit on the advisory board of 

Genie Energy

alongside CIA director, James Woolsey

Roy Cohn associate and media mogul, Rupert Murdoch

Mega Group member Michael Steinhardt

and Lord Jacob Rothschild

Genie Energy is controversial for its 

exclusive rights to drill in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights

Bill Richardson also has ties to Lynn Forester de Rothschild as 

she was on the Bill Richardson’s Advisory Board while he was secretary of energy. 

Richardson appears to be among the Clinton era officials closest to Jeffrey Epstein, 

having personally visited Epstein’s New Mexico ranch and been the recipient of Epstein donations of $50,000 to his 2002 and 2006 gubernatorial campaigns. 

Richardson gave Epstein’s donation in 2006 to charity after allegations against Epstein were made public. 

Richardson was also accused in recently released court documents of engaging in sex with Epstein’s underage victims.